attaching mirror to dresser

Hi I've got a mirror in 3 sections: one that attaches to its own dresser, that is they are a set... and the attached side mirrors swing.
I don't remember there being a thick strap on the back of the center mirror... just small straps, but when I replaced the straps they were not near strong enough to keep the center mirror from falling forward.
Is there a trick or did I just remember incorrectly and the straps were much thicker? The mirrors are about 3 feet tall and weight about 60-80 lbs.
Thanks.
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I haven't seen one of that style for years.
When they were made of wood I recall them being 3/4" thick, 2-3" wide and about 1/2 the height of the mirror plus about 18" down the back of the dresser. They usually attached to some inner structure on the dresser with long screws. They were not just attached to the paper board or plywood backing.
The metal models followed the same general guidelines but were thinner because they were engineered for the job.
Colbyt
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cat herder wrote:

I had an antique, two-section baker's cabinet in my kitchen which was held together in the manner you describe. If the dresser and mirror are truly a set, as opposed to similar parts that were not original to each other, there should be marks and holes from the original fastener. Lacking that, I would engineer a support that will keep the mirror stable. If the mirror frame is thick and wide enough, a wood or metal strap fastened high up enough on the mirror and down the back of the dresser would work. I had a monster size, modern dresser and mirror that had metal parts - two long metal supports on back of mirror which extended about 18" down back of dresser when the mirror was in place. Each was held to the back of the dresser by two rounded, flat metal "loops" that screwed to the dresser and through which the metal supports slipped and were held by tightening screws. Hard to describe - the long metal supports were flat on the side that laid against the mirror and dresser, open on the opposite side and with the two side bent in toward the center.
A simple way of fastening a long support would be to use the long metal strips that anchor to walls for hanging shelving system components. Fastened at top and bottom of mirror, two sides, and down low on dresser, they should hold well, providing the kids don't climb onto the dresser and try to hang on it. :o) The side panels of the mirror need to be folded toward the center somewhat to provide balance and support.
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were all attached to old Real Wood furniture with an internal frame. I wouldn't even try on a modern chipboard cracker box dresser. If you don't have the original dresser and/or mounting sticks, I'd be more inclined to mount the thing to the wall, hotel style, and just set the dresser in front of it. Safer anyway if there are kids in the house- they love to use dressers as staircases/ladders. Bad enough if dresser topples, worse if a sheet of plate glass comes with it.
aem sends...
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