attaching framing studs to poured concrete

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Any suggestions on how to attach framing studs into a poured concrete floor?(specifically a horizontal 2x4, used to attach vertical 2x4 framed wall at the floor)
I don't think masonry nails will work here, and I don't have a Hilti gun at my immediate disposal. Not to be picky, but I don't really want to drill anchors in either. ...
Thanks, Keith
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at
Well you've ruled out the top three means to attach a wood stud to concrete. What do you prefer; Elmers glue or Velcro?
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Hah!
Just as I thought -
What do you think about just using liquid nails to attach it to the floor (without nailing)? This wall is just around the mechanical room, not load bearing or anything, and not prone to abuse. Guess I just ought to arrange use of the hilti gun and do it right though....

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framed
gun
drill
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On Tue, 8 May 2007 18:50:40 -0400, "John Grabowski"

Nope, he wants " studs into a poured concrete". Best I can tell...another means?
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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A smart fellow; smarter the better!

What ARE you willing to do?
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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keglidd wrote:

In a similar situation I drilled for tapcon screws every 4 feet or so. Didn't even bother with a hammer drill, though I did have to redrill one hole when I hit a rock.
The following may be overkill, but is what is recommended around here. Using this technique the wall won't move sideways and the joists are free to shift over time.
The top plate should be 1/4-1/2" below the joists above to allow for shifting. To hold the top in place drill a hole in the top plate and put a framing nail up into the bottom of the joist above, leaving maybe 1/2" of the nail sitting below the bottom of the top plate.
Chris
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Get a Remington masonry gun - the type you hit with a hammer. I spent 60 bucks on the whole shooting match. That included nails, gun, and blank cartridges.
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and ear protection its loud........
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Well, you've narrowed it down so much that I don't have anything to suggest. Is this just for a partition wall, exterior, give us some hints.
STeve
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TapCon screws. But you need to drill holes first in order to screw the bottom wall plate to the floor.

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Thanks All, The remington masonry gun gets my vote - not too much cake, and easy enough for me to handle. I'm just framing in a small closet off to the side of the HVAC room, and this is perfectly workable.
I'm just handy enough to be dangerous. ;)
Keith
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You'll find tapcons a lot cheaper/convenient than buying or renting a masonry gun for a small job like this.
You can buy a pack of 10 or so tapcons with the proper drill bit for <$10. A hammer drill is best, but a regular one will work albeit slower.
Put the board in place, drill right through into the concrete, and then drive the tapcons.
If this is a slab on top of earth (basement floor, garage floor etc), wrap the bottom half of the lumber with heavy plastic - use vapor barrier if you have some. Lumber on top of concrete frequently wicks moisture (concrete is porous), and without protection the wood will rot.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
  Click to see the full signature.
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Don't forget that wood in contact with a slab should be pressure treated.
You can rent a powder actuated fastener gun for 10-15 bucks if you don't want to buy the kind you hit with a hammer. If you go with the latter, use a 3lb hammer; it takes quite a whack to fire the load.
Paul Franklin
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Sounds like the bottom plate of a 2X4 wall.
Put 4" foam sill gasket down under the plate and use 2" concrete nails. Drive them thru the "2 by" until they re flush with the bottom. Line up your wall and pound the concrete nails "home" with a sledge hammer. One good BANG ! each should do it
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keglidd wrote:

Hi, For easy, clean, quck job, rent Hilti or Remington gun and use proper fstenenr with it. Concrete nail is there but it is not easy to use.
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Go to the local rental shop and rent the Hilti drill and whatever bit you need. Some Tapcon bolts and a socket wrench to put them in and you're all set. Probably cost less than $50 and that includes the drill for a morning.
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keglidd wrote:

Rent a Hilti for a day. Home Depot even rents them now. There is no faster, easier more reliable method of attachment.
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I'm in agreement w/ the others who suggest either renting the Hilti or buying a cheap Remington powder-actuated gun, so nothing new there.
I'd suggest the simplest way assuming there's clearance is to frame the wall section on the floor and then stand the sections in place and then fasten the top and bottom sill plates to the floor and ceiling and done...much simpler process than putting down sill plate and a top plate in place and toenailing studs in.
As someone else also noted, remember to use treated for the sill plate if in contact w/ the floor slab and the idea of a membrane between is excellent if it's a below-grade slab particularly.
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You don't need a hilti to drive tapcons.

Absolutely.

The membrane and or a piece of vapor barrier plastic (staple edges to side or top of sill) substitutes for treated lumber.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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