Attaching Deck to House Options

Can you help me think this out? I plan on building a screen porch at ground level and a deck on top of the screen porch on to the end of the house. The deck would be as long as the end of the house (24') and 11 feet out from the end of the house and supported by 4 footing/piers and beams. The deck will be level with the second floor or about 8' above the floor of the screened porch.
The end of the house is 24' and consists of one family room with 2 bedrooms on the second floor. The end of the house sits on a footing with a 24' concrete foundation. The end of the house first floor wall is 2x4 framing resting on the concrete foundation. The second floor (2 bedrooms) have 2x8 joists who's ends are attached to a 2x8. The 2x8 and the joists rest on the 2x4 framing from the first floor.
In the center of the first floor 24' family room wall is a 9' three light sliding patio door of standard height. The header above the patio door is a double 2x8 header. There are no other openings in this lower level wall.
Can I get away with attaching the upper deck joists with a 2x8 attached to the second floor 2x10 sill? And attaching the screen porch joists to a 2x8 and attaching the 2x8 to the first floor framing near the foundation?
Alternatively, I would pour 4 concrete footings and piers next to the existing foundation to support the deck and porch load. I would then tie this into the existing structure at the deck and screen porch level.
Is there an alternative I have not thought of for supporting the house side of the porch and deck?
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attaching new rim boards to both the existing rims is the way to go, I think. although without looking at it, there are no guarantees. if you were concerned about the header over the patio door, you could double the rim in that area, i think. you didn't say what the span of the new joists will be. i assume if it is 2x8's, it is 12' or less?
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snipped-for-privacy@dva.state.wi.us wrote on 10 Apr 2006:

Because of a number of collapses, building departments around the country are death on elevated decks these days. For your own protection, you'll want to pull a permit and get it inspected. Check with the building department first, as local requirements may vary.
I'm betting that they'll want piers to support the first floor. The deck itself will have to be tied into the rim joist for the upper floor, and in a very specific way. Your local inspector will likely want to see bolts through the existing rim joist, or at least lots of large lag screws of the correct length at certain locations.
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Doug Boulter

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On 10 Apr 2006 16:13:02 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@dva.state.wi.us wrote:

. . . .

I like the latter idea, in essence. Build it as a compeletly self-supporting structure. (Which is going to take more than four corner posts, I suspect) And then attach it to the house to keep them from shifting around relative to each other.
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