Attaching CPVC pipe to a shower valve body

I have a4 port shower valve body I am connecting CPVC (1/2") pipes to.
The shower valve is solid brass with all four ports being 1/2" F.I.P. It also comes with four 1/2" brass nipples. So I can get four 1/2" CPVC M.I.P. transition unions (slip CPVC x brass) and screw them directly into the valve body. Or I can screw the 1/2" brass nipples into the four ports on the valve body, and get four 1/2" CPVC F.I.P. transition unions and screw them onto the other end of the nipples. Is there any advantage of doing it one way versus the other?
I have another question regarding an outdoor shower. The pipes are being routed on the inside "side" of the 8" exterior concrete wall. The pipe runs up to about 72" above ground, then I drilled a hole through the 8" wall. I know on the other end I need to secure a shower arm that is 1/2" male, but how do I make the transition from CPVC pipe to the shower arm? If it's an interior wall I would have studs there and will put in a brass drop ear 90 set a little back from the finished wall. But this is exterior wall, so I think perhaps I put in a CPVC elbow then continue with the CPVC pipe through the wall and around 3 inches from the finished exterior surface, change to a transition union (slip CPVC x brass) F.I.P. with the brass end flush with the finished wall? Is this the best way to do it? When I screw in the shower arm, will it end up breaking or twisting the CPVC pipe if I turn it too hard? Or do I need a drop ear 90 that mounts on the inside?
Thanks,
MC
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MiamiCuse wrote: ... I thought you were pouring concrete???
a) whichever you choose
b) yes (need a fixed mount at the head)
--
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Yes that too, I have like 20 concurrent project in my future residence I am working on at one time. The concrete will have to wait till next weekend. I found a mixer I could rent at Home Depot but I am not sure I can push it through the 30" door openings.
Right now I am doing smaller odds & ends items. It never ends.
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buffalo ny: on the tub: sometimes the plumbing will leak less if there are fewer fittings, but if you're working with cpvc and glue mistakes are easily and cheaply fixed with your pvc pipe cutter and some extra fittings. i'm not sure about your detailed descriptions, but using unions would be preferred when it's time to service a fitting drip or replace the unit in the future. see what clearances there are for your assembly and go with the parts choices that allow you to tighten the supply pipe when it drips. on the outdoor shower: i'd go higher than the 72" so your shower arm drop angle will have some clearance to the user's scalp. it will give you more future choices for showerheads and rain shower heads. choose the brass fitting with screw hole ears. depending on your climate see what stop and waste or anti-freeze water valves may be needed to winterize. some of your choices such as stainless steel will depend on the appearance and durability you are looking for. there may be a decorative outdoor shower curtain design for privacy. there may be a drain required beneath the showerhead, depending on your town. i prefer 3/4" for water flow with our 42 psi. our shower arms are 1/2" MIP male iron pipe threads on each end. -b
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1. Cost. Are the MIP fittings cheaper than the combined cost of the FIP fittings and nipples?
2. Availability. Does the store have four MIP fittings in stock? If not, the FIP might make more sense.
3. Fewer Leaks. I've never had a CPVC joint leak, but threaded fittings are a bit more picky. The more fittings, the greater chance of a leak.

Could you pass through the wall, put a 90 degree elbow going up, then attach a drop ear elbow to the outside of the wall? This obviously wouldn't "look" as nice, but it would be secure.
Otherwise, I'd probably add some kind of bracing on the inside for a drop ear elbow, and run a stub out through the wall to the shower arm.
Anthony
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dwtaggart had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/Attaching-CPVC-pipe-to-a-shower-valve-body-341081-.htm : I had a similar setup with my shower valve. At Home Depot I found some fittings that converted from cpvc to the metal valve body. The best thing about them was that they screwed together with a connection similar to a water hose, so you wouldn't have to worry about twisting your cpvc if you had it too loose when you made the initial connection.
Looks like this. http://www.bow-group.com/Pages/popupProduit.aspx?catV&pro#704&LANG=EN&pathV3965&ip=US
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