Attach plywood from the inside (is it possible) ?

I have to remove some termite damaged studs and plate. I'd like to keep the plywood in place (it's only about 3 studs) because there is a brick veneer on the outside and the sheathing is not accessible. Can I just install the new studs and try to install some screws from the inside? The screws will go from the inside of the house out through the sheathing in order to try to pull the sheathing up close to the studs? Or maybe use some type of L-bracket against the sides of the stud to pull the sheetrock in close? Thanks for any advice.
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I wonder if there might be a glue / adhesive / epoxy that has tested structural values ? I've seen a foam glue marketed as reinforcement for roofs in high wind areas. TB
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If it is only 3-4 studs I would not be too concerned about it.
If you like use one by 1 x 1 wall angles secured to the back side of the stud first (on the 3.5" plane) and then use a screw long enough to pull the board against the stud. Of course you will need to use some type of clipper to flush cut and nails that remain in the plywood flush to the surface.
You may also find that that termites munched on the plywood once you start the removal process and there is nothing that will hold a screw.
Anticipating your next question one angle and screw per foot of height would be about the maximum in time and materials that I would invest in the project.
Colbyt
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Are you referring to a 90 degree metal bracket? Attach one side of the bracket into the side of the stud and attach the other side to the plywood?
I have a brick veneer on the outside so I don't think I need to worry about cutting the nails that go through the plywood. If I understood you correctly.
Termites "generally" don't eat plywood if enough other stuff is available. But they will ocassionaly. Sometimes even eat preasure treated. The sheathing looks okay. The termite damage is from about 20 years ago when the previous owner dumped wood chips up against the house. Most of the "muching" was done on the back of the sheetrock. Bottom 2x4 on the plate is toast.
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Answered inline

Yes just your common 90 degree wall angle. After reading Robert's post I think I would add a bead of construction adhesive along the back side of the stud. As I said I have never bothered for one or two studs but Robert A probably has a lot more experience with this type of thing than I do.

I am refering to the nails that secured the plywood to the old studs. They may or may not pull out when you remove the studs. If they don't you are going to need to clip them off. There is usually only about a half inch between the plywood and brick veneer.
Colbyt
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Try a few 18" or so long studs carefully toenailed onto the sheathing and sistered to the new studs. They can work as "handles" to pull in the ply and attach it to the studs.
Just my 2 cents
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Is this a bearing wall? Contact someone locally to look at the project.
Impossible to give good information when all of the factors can not be seen.
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What does this being a load bearing wall have to do with anything? Would you attach the sheathing different if it is a load bearing wall vs not? I'm not asking about how to shore up the house while the work is being done.
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poison snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I am not the poster who posted that, but perhaps he is questioning whether it is a shear wall rather than load bearing. If it is a shear wall, then you would want to pay special attention to making sure that it IS reattached well.
That said, reattaching with adhesive continuously would satisfy the requirement for a shear wall if the correct adhesive were used. Especially since the engineers/architects always overbuild these things due to the impossibility of predicting the application methods that will be used to construct them.
My engineer says that he overengineers everything by about 30% over and above the built-in overengineering in his tables, which he says are about 10%.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
  Click to see the full signature.
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I think I would rely on structural adhesive, PL400 joist type adhesive, as the primary repair. Use some utility angle available at a commercial drywall store attached on each side of the new stud with drywall screws, apply adhesive, install, draw up tight to sheathing with drywall screws through the other flange.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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