attach a coaxial cable jack

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On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 21:40:26 -0500, Jan Philips

And right now it just carries basic non-digital cable, but that may eventually change.
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Jan Philips wrote:

The worthless web sites for the borgs don't show it, but I know they all carry low-end crimpers to go with the connectors they sell. They also have expensive 'wanna be' pro-look crimpers, but the real pros get them from the online jobbers they order their cable and connectors from (at half the borg prices.)
It is a good tool to have, along with a few spare connectors and couplers, and some cable. If a mouse chews through the feed just as somebody's chick flick is starting on a Sunday evening, you'll be able to fix it post-haste.
Do you know where the other end of that cable behind the blank cover plate is? Is it connected to anything? Odd to prewire, and not finish out the cable connectors.
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wrote:

Well, I'm 55 and I've never needed one before.

Yes, it goes up into the attic near the splitter. It has a connector on that end (but isn't in the splitter). The person that built the house was an electrical engineer, and he left the unused phone and cable locations unconnected. He probably knew that he could put on a connector and jack anytime he needed to. I hooked up all of the phone jacks but I've never done a cable jack.
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Jan Philips wrote:

Okay, understand now. Being an EE, hopefully he used RG-6q, rather than the cheap stuff. Are there other non-connected jacks? If so, may want to do them all and get them over with. If not for you, then for the next owner. Do you have room in on the splitter, or will you need to get a bigger one? It is best to not daisy-chain splitters. If your signal levels are marginal, don't forget to put a terminator on any unused connections.
At least your wire is accessible. I need to upgrade my house antenna wiring, but mine is a major pain to get to.
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wrote:

Yes there are. All bedrooms have one connected and one non-connected jack.

The splitter doesn't have room for all of them. But all of the cables are there, labeled, and there is enough for all we use. It is fairly easy to get to.
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Is it BNC RG-58?
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Jan Philips wrote:

type F, either RG-6, or more likely RG-59.
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wrote:

And compression connectors (with the proper tool) are better. You'll need the proper ones for the cable type, RG6 or RG59.
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wrote:

Is one of these the older style? The cable is the older style.
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Jan Philips wrote:

flexible. When Cable/Satt and HD came along, they needed better signal quality, so they switched to the thicker RG-6. Current standard is RG-6Q, for Quad Shield. If you are just on an antenna, the RG-59 should be fine for now, and may work even if you get fancier TVs and signal sources later, if it was carefully installed. At some point, if you have problems, you may want to replace selected runs of the 59 with 6. Hopefully, the EE didn't staple it to any studs, or run it around any tight corners, so you can just attach the new cable to one end, and pull it back through using the old cable as a pull cord. Premade RG-6Q cables with good compression fittings are widely available in 25, 50, and 100 foot coils. Being lazy, if I ever get around to rewiring this place, that is what I will probably use. A decent compression tool costs a lot more than a crimper, and I hate to buy expensive tools for a 1-time job. (Unless I can sweet-talk the satt guy at work into letting me borrow the company tool kit for a weekend, or something...)
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wrote:

The house is wired with RG-59. We have HD in another room and it seems to work OK.
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wrote:

It is RG-59.
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wrote:

You need "F" connectors. It will say on the cable jacket if it's RG-59U, or RG-6. If it was done in the last 20 years it should be 6. Also, every time you split a cable, the signal becomes weaker. For that reason, when we wire cable in new homes, it's typical to only connect the ones being used
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On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 19:54:49 -0500, Jan Philips

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Jan Philips wrote:

Only this type of connector, with a separate ferrule (crimp ring), can be secured with pliers.
http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/DISTRIBUTED-BY-MCM-33-0145-/33-0145
With the ferrule over the cable end, slightly crush it, taking care not to deform the connector or cable, and then pinch one of the protruding sides. If you use a round crimping tool for this, there will be 2 pinches, on opposite sides, but when using pliers it's easier to just pinch one side. If you use pliers with a connector having a built-in ferrule, even a short one, including the type designed to break away, most likely the conector will be bent into a saddle, and you won't be able to screw it tight. A hexagonal crimping tool will not work very well with narrow (1/8") ferrules, only with wider ones.
The more common F-connectors have a long built-in ferrule, like this:
http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/DISTRIBUTED-BY-MCM-/33-8770
It cannot be secured with pliers but only a hexagonal crimper. Get a tool at least 1/4" wide, similar to the $20 Radio Shack model, not their $10 one. The narrower tool will give poor hex crimps. Most hex crimpers are made for 2 sizes of ferrules, and you need the larger size for these connectors, the smaller size for the connectors having separate ferrules.
Video and TV systems use 75 ohm cable, and RG59 and RG6 cables are 75 ohms. RG58 is 50 ohms and is wrong for TV. Also match the connectors to the type of cable - use RG59 with RG59 cable, RG6 with RG6 cable (there are also RG6QS double-shielded cables and connectors). RG58 connectors are slightly too large for RG59 cable.
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On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 19:54:49 -0500, Jan Philips

Just for the record, I gather from the thread that you're actually going to put on a coaxial cable plug (not a jack), and connnect that to a female-to-female (jack-to-jack) connector that is mounted in the wall plate. So the end of it in the room is a jack.
And to avoid confusion down the road, these are also called F-connectors.
And iirc I once tried pliers and it didnt' work well.
They also have screw-on F connectors, and for me they didnt' work too well either, but maybe I didn't do something right.
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wrote:

Right.
OK, I didn't know that.
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On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 19:54:49 -0500, Jan Philips

OK, it is on. The twist type was easy to do. I'll have to wait before I can test it. The package says the twist type is for antenna only, use a crimp or solder type for cable. I'll see if it works well enough.
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On Sun, 08 Nov 2009 15:33:57 -0500, Jan Philips

And thanks for all the useful replies.
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On Sun, 08 Nov 2009 15:33:57 -0500, Jan Philips

That's interesting. It seems to me antenna signals are the weakest signals such cables will carry, and if anything, they would need the soldered connector because they are so weak.
But there are a lot of things I don't know.

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