At what PSI does a plastic soda bottle explode? (home CO2 carbonation)

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Explosion occurs at 150psi.
I think your confusion comes from some poor wording at that Wiki site.
This quote: "The Build Team also found that water cooler jugs, while able to launch higher at the standard air/water ratio for water bottle rockets, were weaker than standard soda bottles (which are designed to hold carbonated liquids), failing at around 60 psi (413 kPa) less than the soda bottles (90psi (600kPa) as opposed to 150psi (1000kPa))."
might read more clearly as: "The Build Team also found that water cooler jugs were able to launch higher at the standard air/water ratio for water bottle rockets. However, the jugs were weaker than standard soda bottles, failing at around 90 psi (600 kPa), much less than the soda bottles, which fail at 150psi (1000kPa)."
The intermixing of English and Metric also adds to the confusion of the Wiki page's wording.
--
Tegger


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In typed:

Good grief: If a bottle broke open it because it froze, that had to do with the expansion of the contents, not the carbonation. You can do the same thing with plain water for pete's sake.
Many people hoodwinked here - it had nothing to do with the carbonation and knowing the exploding point of the bottles isn't much use when it's pressure from freezing and expanding contents inside the plastic, and even less to do with home carbonation. When liquid cools, it expands - which can burst bottles, metal pipes, whatever.
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On 4/6/2010 3:34 PM, Elmo wrote:

They do blow up and with considerable force. My neighbor's friend works in the bottled gas business. His company makes dry ice. He gets it for nothing and uses it for keeping his beer cold when he comes out here for the weekend. He likes to make loud noises by dropping dry ice into plastic pop bottles then sealing them up.
Better than the big firecrackers we called blockbusters when I was a kid.
You wouldn't want one of those bottles next to your crotch if it decided to go boom.
SM, don't try to impress the kids at church. Someone will get hurt.
LdB
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Elmo wrote:

Lots of experience at rec.crafts.brewing.
If you are just carbonating drinks, there is no reason to go over 50 psi unless you are in an extreme hurry. Why bother?
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Yes. Burst design value is 200PSI. Burst testing regularly done a most PET bottle blowmold mfg plants. It's part of quality control.
Can they blow a lower pressures? Certainly. Nothing's perfect. Sometimes they pop at higher pressures. Bottles go through SIGNIFICANT deformation before popping. Will they pop at normal usage pressures? Not likely. Coca Cola & Pepsi have billions at stake to lose in lawsuits from angry consumers and hungry lawyers. They R not fools. Their PET bottle do not often pop at 55PSI common working pressure. One out of a trillion? quintillion? billion? I have no clue. But not often enough for them to lose money. Otherwise they'd make their bottles thicker and stronger.
Interesting graphic documentary... http://www.fizzgiz.com/PepsiBottlePopper00.htm
Interesting videos... Popping one with co2 powered keyboard dust blower...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LnB6l6-TUkw

Air compressor co2 blowups...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_QvUC3EqxA

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On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 20:34:49 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

Particularly on topic for me because I have an Air Horn on my bicycle:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
It uses what appears to be a slightly thicker version of a soda bottle. It is a very effective horn, in fact, a bit too loud. It sounds like a Hemi on helium but does get through those jogger's headphones.
Anyway, the bottle is usually fastened right below the crossbar, which is right below my, well, nuts. We're told to fill it to 100 psi. If there is one thing I don't want, it's that bottle exploding down there.
Note the cost of this item. The price "reduction" drops it below the free shipping ($25) level so it ends up costing more. Excuse me but I'll just pay full price and get it shipped for free.
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RTFM - it has a volume control.
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 08:58:02 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

That's no volume control - it's an on/off switch. They can say whatever they want but I own one. Any touch strong enough to release the air causes enough noise to make someone jump.
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I own 2 on bicycles and one hand held I use as a backup on my boat. There is a VOLUME CONTROL on the side. It is a little knob connected to a cam that squeezes the air tube to reduce volume.
Once again...
RTFM
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On Mon, 12 Apr 2010 10:27:26 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I'll take a look - that would be a good thing. I don't recall that I ever saw a manual.
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It's one of the bright red or orange bits on the side. Just a little lever attached to a cam that constricts the hose as you rotate it.
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On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 08:40:09 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

You are correct and you have made my life a little bit better. That horn was really too loud and now I can attenuate it so the target doesn't die of a heart attack. It gets so messy when that happens.
I have to attach it to my new bike. I don't bother using it during the winter because there aren't that many joggers clogging the bike lanes. Now they're out in full force.
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For pedestrians and joggers, I find that clicking my brake levers is usually sufficient to alert them. It doesn't hurt to call out "On your left" as you approach, so they hopefully don't move the wrong way to evade you.
I use the horn (at full volume) for cars that do anything threatening, like pulling out of a driveway yakking on their cell phone.
It's very effective at getting their attention.
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On Thu, 15 Apr 2010 14:10:19 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Clicking the brake lever? For folks blasting music into their ears? I have an actual bell on the bike and they don't hear that.
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If they have ear buds and music blasting, then obviously I blow the air horn.
I can also yell and whistle pretty loud.
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I hydrostatically tested one at 150 psi (a cheap thin one) and it was just fine. HTH :-)
Bob
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Considering all the above .................. were these tests conducted on brand new (previously unusd) or 'used' ad emptied bottles?
Used bottles having been previously stressed by the 'normal' pressure of soft drinks.
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On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 20:34:49 +0000 (UTC), Elmo wrote:
From: Coca-Cola Support < snipped-for-privacy@na.ko.com
Thank you for contacting The Coca-Cola Company. We appreciate your interest in our Company and our brands.
As you know, the amount of PSIs (pounds of pressure per square inch) that a package is able to withstand depends on the volume of carbonation and is based on the product as much as the package. At lower temperatures, the pressure is lower, and at higher temperatures, the pressure is higher.
Carbonation is measured in "volumes." One volume of CO2 is equal to one liter of carbon dioxide dissolved in one liter of liquid at standard temperature and pressure. Two volumes are equal to two liters of gas in one liter of liquid, etc. The amount of CO2 absorbed by the liquid is a function of temperature and pressure. The colder the liquid and the higher the pressure, the more CO2 it absorbs. One volume is equal to 14.7 lbs. per square inch (psi) pressure at sea level and at 60 F.
All PET packages can withstand 150 PSIs - the industry standard. However, some of our PET packaging can withstand 250 PSIs. Unfortunately, we will not be able to provide a list of which ones can withstand 250 PSIs.
We certainly appreciate your interest in our production processes for our brands. However, in order for us to remain competitive in our industry, some information is considered proprietary, and we are unable to share it with the public.
We hope this information is helpful. Please feel free to contact us again should you have any other questions or comments.
Sincerely,
Johnetta Industry & Consumer Affairs The Coca-Cola Company
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interest
wanna blow $100, you can buy the voluntary spec's publication from the beverage producers association. That document is supposed to cover in detail all aspects of PET bottle design voluntary standards.
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On Tuesday, April 6, 2010 at 3:34:49 PM UTC-5, Elmo wrote:

Be careful you know they don't check them all, only a significantly large statistically relevant sample. A bad batch of plastic and not all the defectives may be removed be fore shipping.
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