At what PSI does a plastic soda bottle explode? (home CO2 carbonation)

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<stuff snipped>

Strongly agree!
My dad was a safety engineer and often testified at trials as an expert witness. Soda bottles have a rich history of litigation. If they are dropped just right in a store, for example, the cap can blow off with enough force to put out an eye, and it's happened many times, it's not just a freak one-off occurrence. Injuries have lessened with plastic v. glass bottles, but they have not vanished entirely.
Much engineering has gone into designing safer bottles (the odd star-shape of the bottom is designed to "pop" visibly when dropped and provide some visual warning that the bottle is overpressured. The screw threads on the cap are interrupted for the same reason). Still, there are soda bottle accidents every year in the US. Many are caused by shelf stockers insisting on filling high shelves beyond capacity, making a floor drop from considerable height all but certain.
Overpressurizing them for fun with kids around seems to be a pretty silly idea. But they do make passable silencers for pistols if attached correctly.
Search for "soda bottle eye injury" on Google to find many tales like this:
"We have come across six patients of ocular injuries due to CBB explosions during a period of nearly two years. All the cases had unila­teral involvement, right eye in four cases and left eye in two cases. All of these patients had severe visual loss. Initial visual acuity, after the injury ranged from loss of perception of light to finger counting at two meters distance. In one case the eye was badly mutilated and had to be enucleated. In five cases, the injury was caused by glass splinters, while in one case it was due to the cap of the bottle. The injury due to the bottle cap was interesting in that it left a clear impression of its crenated edge on the skin of the lids and the cornea which gives some indication of the force of the impact. In four cases the CBB exploded without provocation."
Source: http://www.ijo.in/article.asp?issn 01-4738;year82;volume0;issue=1;spageG;epageP;aulast=Gupta
-- Bobby G.
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On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 22:35:12 -0400, Robert Green wrote:

All very interesting especially the interrupted screw threads!
Never even noticed that until I just now took a look.
I suspect it makes the (over)pressurized air blow by the gaps, right?
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It all depends on how much you fart into it, first.
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mike wrote:

As long as you are only trying to carbonate something and not force an explosion, wouldn't only a few PSI be adequate?
Mysterious Traveler
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On Wed, 07 Apr 2010 15:54:20 -0500, Mysterious Traveler wrote:

Yes. My regulator is faulty. I thought it was the gauges but when I put a second set of gauges on, I realized the regulator isn't working. It's always at something over 150 psi.
It's not a big deal, as Coke confirmed by phone all their plastic 20oz to 2 liter PETE bottles are safety tested at the "industry standard" 150 psi and some are even tested to 250 psi.
I've successfully carbonated, so far, water, grape juice, pinot noir wine, lemonade, and orange juice. The attempt at carbonated milk and carbonated yogurt weren't the most stellar of achievements though; neither was the ice-cream carbonation nor the strawberry fruit carbonation.
But, I keep learning, e.g., here they actually test the burst pressure of a 2l coke bottle (and show a slo-mo video with the pressure counter in the corner): http://home.people.net.au/~aircommand/procedures.htm - Maximum Operating Pressure is called MOP (which is what you do when you reach it) - Test 1: 2 liter coke bottle burst at 190 psi (the bottle actually stretches lengthwise in the slow motion video) - Test 2: 1.25 liter coke bottle burst at 185 psi (in slow motion you see the cones on the bottom stretch out to almost cylindrical before bursting) - Test 3: 1.5 liter coke bottle burst at 175 psi (always the bottom or sides give out before the cap does) - Test 4: 1.25 liter coke bottle with duct tape burst at 195 psi (for the first time, the cap sprunk a leak but the failure mode was the package)
http://www.aquariumadvice.com/forums/f20/what-is-the-psi-rateing-for-a-coke-bottle-62325.html - A soda can is able to withstand over 100 PSI - A 6.5-ounce glass soda bottle can withstand 225 PSI - A 16-ounce glass soda bottle can withstand 175 PSI - A PET soda bottle can withstand 150 PSI--the industry standard
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On Apr 6, 4:34 pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

Stolen without permission from http://kwc.org/mythbusters/2005/11/episode_42_steel_toe_amputatio.html
Bottle Rocket Blast Off Myth: You can launch someone 30-40ft with a bottle-rocket-powered backpack.
"At 60 psi they would need 28 bottles, which is more than the 15 used in the game show clip, so they decided to see how much more pressure they could put into the bottles. Using a bike pump they were able to get a the soda bottles up to 95 psi before their arms gave out. In order to find the failure point of the bottles they hooked up the pneumatic pump from Grant's "Deadblow" battle robot. The soda bottles exploded at 150 psi and the water cooler bottles exploded at 95 psi, so they decided that using soda bottles was better for the test even though they got much more lift out of the water cooler bottle."
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On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 14:05:36 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03 wrote:

That's interesing. Thanks for the reference!
I wonder why Coke said ALL their PET bottles (from 20 oz to 2 liters) ar
How can we find the "industry standard" for soda bottles?
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DerbyDad03 wrote:
<SNIP previously quoted material>

<SNIP from here>
There are many bike tires rated to take 105, even 110 PSI.
A decent floor pump can achieve 110-120 PSI in the hands of most serious cyclists and bike mechanics.
Frame-fit pumps for "road bikes" in my experience can achieve 130-150 PSI. Back when I worked a messenger job, I often pumped my rear tire to 130-140 PSI so that I could carry heavier loads (80-150 pounds) on a rear rack that I built for the purpose. I made more money that way, and the motor vehicle messengers in my company were happier to get less business in the areas where parking was more impossible.
Experience taught me which tires were able to take such abuse, and which ones were not. (And an extra-loud *KABOOM* would sometimes occur at a very inconvenient time, such as halfway through a 2 mile delivery run, or while my bike was parked in my home at 5 AM. Some messengers keep their bikes in their bedrooms, although I did not combine that with a tire rated 110-115 PSI and inflated to 130-140 PSI.)
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Not a news group but you may find the answers you seek here: http://www.truetex.com/carbonation.htm
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On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 20:34:49 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

I have a compressed air horn on my bicycle that uses a soda bottle as the presssure tank. It has warnings all over it not to exceed 70 PSI, and that is for a soda bottle that has had an additional safety sleeve on it to prevent flying shards.
The plastic gets brittle when cold, so that would be an additional factor to consider.
I cannot imagine why you would want anywhere near 150 PSI for soda.
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wrote:

The horn proly doesn't need more than 20-30 psi -- I'da thought a hose straight to your ass would produce that easily, on command. I thought you were a Greenie, anyway....
--
EA


>
> The plastic gets brittle when cold, so that would be an additional
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On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 18:55:23 -0400, "Existential Angst"

The horn needs 70 PSI. When it gets down to 20, it's not very loud.
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On Tue, 06 Apr 2010 19:00:00 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

How do you pressurize it?
Do you use an air pump or C02 tank?
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On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 23:12:16 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

compressor
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On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 20:34:49 +0000 (UTC), Elmo wrote:

Thank God for young boys. Empirical data is only a video away!
"A typical two-liter soda bottle can generally reach the pressure of 100 psi (690 kPa) safely" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_rocket
How to make a soda bottle explode (slow motion): http://www.metacafe.com/watch/991622/soda_bottle_explosion_steps_on_how_to /
Blowing up 2 liter soda bottle (skip to 5:00 min for the explosion):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuXhze-xyiw

Coke Bottle PSI Bombs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5rugiELG5Q

Soda bottle bomb
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KyGsO5S_DhU

Launching Pressurized Bottle Rockets @100 psi
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUadbuuFktM

Exploding bottles with Dry Ice:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TlqZUyXjKZo

How to Make a LOUD Water Bottle Bomb
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
γj9EFhKvAw
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Why is it so popularly mentioned on the web how to blow up soda bottles with caustic chemicals? (This is far from the first time I have heard on the web and in Usenet how to do that with caustic chemicals of one sort or another.)
If someone has to make a big bang and maybe attract attention of the police, would it not be more wise to use something not so caustic, such as vinegar and chalk, or better still water and a bunch of Alka-Seltzer tablets, or a long hose and an air compressor or a long hose and a bicycle pump made to achieve higher pressures used in road bikes and track bikes? Get someone good and strong to operate the bike pump if much more than 150 PSI is needed to get the cars coming in with red and blue flashing lights?
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Maybe I was a bit premature - other links in the article that I responded to did show soda bottles being blown up by an air compressor and apparently also by a bike pump.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Wed, 7 Apr 2010 22:48:15 +0000 (UTC), Don Klipstein wrote:

Interestingly, the only time the cap failed was when they heat treated the coke bottle beforehand, as shown in in these tests: http://home.people.net.au/~aircommand/procedures.htm
Interestingly, in general, the larger the bottle, the lower the burst pressure.
For example, while the standard 2 liter coke bottle with label burst at 168 psi, the standard 1.25 liter coke bottle burst at 185 psi.
Also interesting was the more gas (less liquid), the higher the burst pressure; for example, that same 1.25 liter coke bottle burst at 190 psi when it contained significant air.
In their last reported test, a 2 liter PET bottle failed at a lower psi than you'd expect (150 psi) after simulated use (held at 130 psi for 3 minutes). This test might indicate plastique fatigue occurs with repeated high pressurization.
So, I'd say Coke's report that all their bottles can handle 150 psi seems reasonable as the MOP (maximum operating pressure) for PETE bottles.
BTW, those numbers are all way higher than the "guesstimates" made here: http://www.instructables.com/answers/how_much_psi_does_a_coke_bottle2l_hold /
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On Thu, 8 Apr 2010 06:12:08 +0000 (UTC), Elmo wrote:

Despite both Coke's statements and independent tests showing coke bottles exploding well almost at 200 psi, the mythbusters seem to intimate they explode at the much lower 150 psi pressure. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MythBusters_%282005_season%29
So, I'm confused.
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On Thu, 8 Apr 2010 07:06:54 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

You are also an accident waiting to happen.
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