At what PSI does a plastic soda bottle explode? (home CO2 carbonation)

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Anyone know at what PSI a typical plastic soda bottle explodes?
I've built a home carbonation system. The gauges say I've put in 150PSI of C02 into the Trader Joe's (admittedly thick) carbonated water bottles.
Nothing happened (with respect to explosions).
Yet, as I dig on the web, I find that plastic soda bottles are supposed to explode at 120 to 150psi. http://community.nbtsc.org/wiki/HomeMadeSoda
Obviously I need more data.
Do you have data points showing when soda bottles explode?
PS: If there's a soda or carbon dioxide related newsgroup for home carbonation, please let me know.
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On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 20:34:49 +0000 (UTC), Elmo wrote:

They do explode. http://www.stevespangler.com/teaching-moments/soda-bottle-explodes-like-a-bomb /
The question is the pressure at which they explode.
Glass bottles explode from 70 to 100psi. Soda bottles can go way over 200 psi.
Call Coca Cola's information line 800-438-2653, 800-638-3286, or 800-888-6488 and let us know what they tell you.
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On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 13:43:42 -0700, LM wrote:

I'm on the line with them right now! They are very helpful!
They do the research for you, while you wait. So far, the woman says the maximum psi the package can withstand is based on the volume of carbonation and type of fluid it contains.
Digging more, she says every one of their carbonated PET containers from 20 ounces to 2 liters can withstand the industry standard 150 psi. In addition, some Coke products have PET packaging that can withstand up to 250 psi (it all depends on the type of product in the package).
They're gonna send me via email WHICH bottles can withstand 250 psi as the lady said she had to sent that over to the Research Department.
Of course, I'm using Trader Joe's (very thick) plastic bottles so I'm not sure how much of this applies; but, maybe that explains why I had no explosions at 150psi yesterday.
It's great to learn from everyone here. If you have any information about when a soda bottle explodes, please post the reference here!
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At 150 PSI, they would be useful as expansion tanks for air compressors. Now, someone to make a manifold so we can string together a bunch of two or three liter bottles. Watch. Harbor Freight will have them next week.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 17:00:00 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Interesting idea!
1. Buy copper pipe 2. Drill ten holes 2 inches apart in the steel pipe for the threaded bolts 3. Tap the ten holes in the galvanized steel pipe for the threaded bolts 3. Drill an axial hole through the center of ten threaded bolts 4. Drill a hole through the center of ten soda caps for the threaded bolts 5. Screw the ten threaded bolts into the caps and then into the steel pipe 6. Cap one end of the steel pipe & place a chuck on the other end 7. Chuck the other end of the steel pipe onto your CO2 regulator hose 6. Screw ten 2 liter soda bottles onto the ten caps bolted to the pipe 7. Turn on the C02 gas and pressurize the twenty liters to 150psi 8. Remove the chuck 9. You now have 20 liters of 150psi portable C02!
QUESTION: How many liters of gas does a typical automotive car tire take anyway?
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I'd have to tape measure one, and calculate it out. I'd figure a passenger car tire at maybe 3 to 5 liters of air space, at 35 PSI. Starting at 150, you'd get some where.
When we used to be able to get freon tank conversions. I found that a 30 pound tank starting at 150 PSI would fill one car tire from zero to about 28 PSI.
Easier to make a sort of manifold by drilling through the cap, and then fasten the cap to the maifold. Use close nipple, and a fitting in and out of the soda pop cap. Then, screw the bottle on. Eventually, you'd need a new cap or a new bottle. But they are cheap enough.
Soda bottle as water pipe expansion tank sounds good. At least you can see if it's water logged.
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Eyeball-estimate - roughly a torus that on largish side has a tubular cross section whose diameter is 20 cm, and with a 50 cm diameter of the tube's "centerline". Volume of such a "largish tire" would in cubic centimeters be 20 squared times pi/4 tomes 50 times pi, or 49,348 cubic centimeters. Divide by 1,000 to get liters - about 49.
That does sound to me large for a tire, maybe about right for a tire for a large SUV. Also, most car and SUV tires are not inflated past 36 PSI. 50 liters at 36 PSI, if compressed to 150 PSI, takes up 12 liters.
One more thing - CO2 has slightly different dynamics in compressibility than air does, due to its lower specific heat ratio. CO2 at 32 PSI in a 14 PSI atmosphere has the same "stiffness" as air would have at about 28.5 PSI. The vehicle's ride and "road feel" and how much the tires get mashed by bumps and potholes would be as if the tires were underinflated about 11%. The specific heat ratio of a gas alters its compressibility when it is compressed or expanded quickly enough to have its temperature respond to the change in pressure rather than being held by heat conduction to the ambient temperature.
However, the wear rate and wear pattern would be determined more by the pressure alone. Compensating with a higher pressure would concentrate the wear towards the "centerline" of the tread.
Also, pressure alone contributes to much of the stress that parts of the tire must face and the shape of the tire and its contact patch when it is supporting a load. This affects its traction on wet roadways at higher speeds. These factors can severely limit use of higher pressure just because the gas is more compressible in a "dynamic sense".
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Wed, 7 Apr 2010 00:52:17 +0000 (UTC), Don Klipstein wrote:

Then all we need are 6 two liter Coca Cola soda bottles! We could just as easily fill them up with compressed air as with C02. Sounds interesting. I'm waiting for the you-tube video of the manifold!
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On Wed, 7 Apr 2010 00:52:17 +0000 (UTC), Don Klipstein wrote:

What volume of gas is contained in an automotive tire: http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/2001-08/998945256.Ch.r.html
Those guys came up with 10 liters at 30psi, given: * Inside diameter of rubber tire 15" = ~40 cm = 4 dm * Outside diameter of rubber tire 21" = ~50 cm = 5 dm * Width of steel wheel 6" = ~15 cm = 1.5 dm * Pressure inside the rubber tire 30 psi * Temperature 25 C
The volume inside the tire is the volume difference between two cylinders, one representing the entire wheel/tire assembly and the other representing just the wheel.
The volume of a cylinder is V = p diameter height where diameter is twice the radius.
Note: For your particular tire and wheel assembly, you can use the Tire Diameter and Circumference Calculator at: http://www.csgnetwork.com/tiresizescalc.html
They used the numbers below:
For just the steel wheel, the volume p (4 dm 2)2 1.5 dm = 19 cubic decimeters (i.e., 19 liters).
For just the rubber tire assembly, the total volume p (5 dm 2)2 1.5 dm = 29 cubic decimeters (i.e., 29 liters).
The volume difference is just 10 liters (which means that the air in the tire will mass about 26 grams).
Another volume calculation is here: http://www.irday.com/html/Automotive%20tire%20wheel%20engineering/20080413/9827.html Those guys came up with 30 liters for an average truck tire.
This volume calculation puts a car tire at 1 to 2 cubic feet of air: http://mgaguru.com/mgtech/tools/ar104.htm
BTW, what happens to the mass if we use a different gas than air, like carbon dioxide?
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 08:34:56 -0700, LM wrote:

This tire volume calculator works better: http://www.club80-90syncro.co.uk/Syncro_website/TechnicalPages/TRC%20calculator.htm
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 15:36:49 +0000 (UTC), Kat Rabun wrote:

http://www.club80-90syncro.co.uk/Syncro_website/TechnicalPages/TRC%20calculator.htm
My P225/55R16 Traction=A, Temperature=A, TreadwearH0 car tires calculate to 14.76 liters each (60 liters for four tires).
So a four-foot manifold with eight 2L Coke bottles hanging down would completely fill one tire.
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On Friday, April 9, 2010 at 10:34:56 AM UTC-5, LM wrote:

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Many people are using nitrogen in their tires now and paying a premium for it. The benefits are not so from the physical qualities of the gas, but th e fact that the gas contains absolutely no water. So the tire pressure cha nges less due to temperature changes.
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On Sat, 2 May 2015 19:05:37 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Some of the benefits most certainly are from the physical properties of the gas. Aside from the benefits due simply to lack of water vapor, the hydrogen migrates less thru the tire structure and that makes the tire pressure stay up longer then when you use plain old air. In addition, the nitrogen does not oxidize the tire materials the way the oxygen in plain old air does and that also is beneficial to tire life. All that said, for most people the benefits of nitrogen are relatively small and if you pay much for it you may not recover that extra cost. For truckers the benefits are much greater,particularly the benefits of the tire components not being oxidized since they will retread a truck tire many times over it's carcass life. And with nitrogen the carcass will last longer.
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I've heard that you can use metal lamp connector rods that are threaded on both ends. Apparently someone did that with water bottle rockets. http://h2orocket.com/water-rockets/lamp-rod-rockets/
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I would advise to have your pressurized bottle located in a location where an explosion is tolerable. I would not bet my life or the house on the pressure to be used to not exceed what it should not exceed, or the bottle to not have a flaw or damage (possibly incurred after its manufacture) that causes it to fail to withstand what it's supposed to withstand.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Apr 6, 1:34pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

If you don't believe your own gauges, why would you believe anonymous blather posted on the net? If you think your gauges are messed up, try different gauges and see.
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On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 13:47:03 -0700 (PDT), mike wrote:

My gauges are old. I don't want blather. I want facts. And references.
I always search first, so, I already did my search and posted the results. But maybe someone else out there is a better searcher than I am and can provide a reference. Surely I'm not the best there is.
I did follow up on the suggestion to call Coke (even though I'm using Trader Joe's bottles).
The Coke plastic PETE bottles (from 20 oz to 2 liters) are either tested to 150 psi or to 250 psi (I'm waiting for them to confirm by mail which ones).
It would be nice to have more references though as I can't be the best Internest searchist out there....
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On Apr 6, 5:01pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

Coke bottles used for water heater expansion tank
Jimmie
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I can assure you having seen a sprite truck lose 100 or so cases out the back of a tractor trailer, its roll up door must not of been secured and his inventory fell out the back some bottles expoloded and many leaked at the caps.
explosion appeared to depend on agitating bottles.
the police got upset when I called 911 I asked for the reps ID number and pointed out the truck left, not knowing of the mess it was leaving behind it, and all this debris were going to cause a accident.......
telpehone cop said he woud send a car.
wish I had a camera it would of been nice for americas funniest hme videos or u tube.......
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JIMMIE wrote:

I would be leary about the ability to withstand 150 or 120 PSI being valid at the highest temperature that can be encountered in this application. I have had experience with boiling water causing PET soda bottles to soften and go out of shape without any significant pressure at all.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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