AT&T rural phone service

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I had a recent conversation with a AT&T tech and asked him what the status of old rural landlines for old rural home phones was. He said it all would be abandoned in 5 years (2020). It would be replaced with VOIP over their required satellite service (Dish). Cost would start at $19.95/mo without a ll the current taxes but I'm sure they'll want you to take more services. Sounds pretty shaky if you need to dial 911 in a hurry and coverage is down due to weather.
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On 2015-01-09 6:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Not to mention the 1/2 second delay (minimum) inherent in VoIP on a satellite connection.
--
Dr. WTF

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On Fri, 9 Jan 2015 17:34:53 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

It's really not a problem. Jack Bauer will have Chloe reposition the satellite so that it's not over a storm.
Unless of course it's a hydronuclear storm on the sun.
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On Friday, January 9, 2015 at 5:34:57 PM UTC-8, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

ld be abandoned in 5 years (2020). It would be replaced with VOIP over the ir required satellite service (Dish). Cost would start at $19.95/mo without all the current taxes but I'm sure they'll want you to take more services. Sounds pretty shaky if you need to dial 911 in a hurry and coverage is do wn due to weather.
What?! You mean when I turn the crank and ask for Sarah the operator she wo n't be there any more?
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On Friday, January 9, 2015 at 8:34:57 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

ld be abandoned in 5 years (2020). It would be replaced with VOIP over the ir required satellite service (Dish). Cost would start at $19.95/mo without all the current taxes but I'm sure they'll want you to take more services. Sounds pretty shaky if you need to dial 911 in a hurry and coverage is do wn due to weather.
An AT&T tech might know something, but AFAIK, AT&T isn't even the company that's responsible. When AT&T was split up in the 80s, the baby bells took over the installed landlines, local phone service, etc. I'd be surprised i f there is some majic cuttoff date. I expect it will just slowly die off and how long copper lasts anywhere will be a localized issue. Here in NJ, some shore communities were the first in the country where the phone compan y (Verizon) decided not to replace damaged copper.
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On Sat, 10 Jan 2015 03:32:46 -0800 (PST), trader_4

company. Today's AT&T came from one or more baby bells merging with Cingular Wireless. In some parts of the country, AT&T *is* the local phone company. In other parts, Verizon has that honor. There are others, too.
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On Saturday, January 10, 2015 at 7:37:33 AM UTC-5, Pat wrote:

would be abandoned in 5 years (2020). It would be replaced with VOIP over their required satellite service (Dish). Cost would start at $19.95/mo with out all the current taxes but I'm sure they'll want you to take more servic es. Sounds pretty shaky if you need to dial 911 in a hurry and coverage is down due to weather.

Yes, I see you're right. I didn't realize ATT put part of it's old self back together again. In fact, I see that they are now apparently the largest provider of local service in the USA (again).
So, some googling produced this:
http://stopthecap.com/2014/03/03/att-proposes-pulling-the-plug-on-landline- service-in-alabama-and-florida/
"AT&T is likely to be the biggest winner if it successfully scraps its copp er network. The company wants to drop landline service completely by 2020, saving the company millions while ending government oversight and eliminati ng service obligations."
So, the OP/tech are apparently right, that ATT wants to at least try to be out in 5 years. And it's not just rural, it's everywhere. Still seems unlikely they will achieve it, but it certainly could happen in some places .
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On 1/10/2015 7:37 AM, Pat wrote:

Here is CT, ATT pulled out of the landline business. We are now part of Frontier. So far, they have doubles my DSL speed.
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I thought it was still illegal to retire the old POTS networks. What? They jes leave all that copper in the ground or are they recovering it? What about thieves?
nb
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On Saturday, January 10, 2015 at 12:27:45 PM UTC-5, notbob wrote:

Why would it be "illegal"? They probably have to convince the state utility commission, but they could certainly do that. Most of that copper isn't in the ground, it's in the air, strung across miles of poles. With the price of copper, it's probably worth it for someone to recover it, maybe they sell it off to a third party to recover, etc.
It's already happened here in NJ. A few of the shore towns hit by Sandy, Verizon is not replacing the copper.
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wrote:

but they are no doubt replacing it with something better than satellite.
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On Saturday, January 10, 2015 at 12:57:07 PM UTC-5, Pico Rico wrote:

Yes, IDK what exactly, but some VOIP, FIOS I think, The area has cable, so that's an alternative too. The real question is how is AT&T going to get completely out of copper in 5 years in sparsely populated rural areas where there is no other infrastructure, ie cable, etc. They surely aren't going to run fiber all over the place. Would utility regulators let them abandon those customers? Wonder if OP asked the tech?
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On Saturday, January 10, 2015 at 5:44:46 PM UTC-6, trader_4 wrote:

The problem I was referring to is mostly hilly rural where there is no cabl e and only 1 cell carrier @ $155/mo, if you're lucky to get service. The l andline is all buried, not air. The line is encapsulated 100 pair #22 wire , so probably more insulation per foot than copper. It's buried about 36" d eep so removal is more expensive & trouble than worthwhile to them or thiev es.
There was some talk a while back about installing fiber, but the trial was a flop because of cost vs income unless it was a well populated area. Us r ural folks are being left out of technology growth except for satellites. Hope a solar flare doesn't fry them & isolate us.
And yeah, state utility regulators are involved. But special interest folks find a way to influence them.
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On 1/10/2015 11:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

You chose to live in a rural area, no doubt in part to 'get away from it all'. Every decision comes with a price, and the price of getting away from it all is the additional expense of bringing it to you once you change your mind.
You can enjoy your rural amenities, or move to a more densely-populated area with better internet options. Or, you can make the argument that providing internet service to rural areas should be considered a common good, a public utility, same as rural electrification and postal delivery - and like them, provided as a government service paid for via taxpayers. Of course, if you take that approach, doubtless some of your neighbors and your local internet provider will oppose it. If you succeed in persuading enough people to make the local government seriously consider it, at that point your local internet provider will either file suit against the government, or suddenly announce that providing high-speed internet to rural households *is* economically feasible after all, just to block the public development of actual competition. It's played out both of those ways in the state I live in.
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On 01/12/2015 8:16 AM, Moe DeLoughan wrote: ...

"Rural electrification" is _NOT_ a public utility; they are member-owned cooperatives with only some accessibility to loan guarantees provided via the Rural Electrification Act.
--


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On 1/12/2015 9:19 AM, dpb wrote:

Cooperatives provide the public utility, which is the service to the public of something such as phone, electricity, or water. Only difference is that a coop is member owned, as compared to an investor owned or privately held company. Either way, the point is the same: the federal government brought electricity to rural areas. It took FDR to propose it as part of his New Deal and an act of Congress to provide public money to make it happen, 'cause the private sector said Nope, there's no profit in doing that.
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And if you believe that, I have a bridge in Brooklyn to sell you!!!!!
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trader_4 wrote:

I've got AT&T for my long distance provider although I'm not sure why. I seldom make long distance calls and if I do it's on the cell. Too lazy to cancel, I guess. Anyway, AT&T doesn't own the local copper. That's CenturyLink aka Quest aka US West.
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On 01/09/2015 07:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

$20 seems like a good price
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On Saturday, January 10, 2015 at 10:31:07 PM UTC-5, philo  wrote:

ould be abandoned in 5 years (2020). It would be replaced with VOIP over t heir required satellite service (Dish). Cost would start at $19.95/mo witho ut all the current taxes but I'm sure they'll want you to take more service s. Sounds pretty shaky if you need to dial 911 in a hurry and coverage is down due to weather.

Does VOIP even work via sat? I would think the delay would be a problem. But I guess if that's the plan, it must work, but I wonder how well?
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