asphalt over concrete?

I have a very old garage with a totally wrecked concrete floor; it looks a little like the freeways that endured the Northridge earthquake. We park our cars in there, but I would like a level smooth surface.
I know I coul rip out the old concrete and pour new after laying a proper base, but that's the expensive, albeit correct way.
Would this concrete (not crumbling, just cracked, heaved slabs) be a good base for an asphalt floor?
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<< Would this concrete (not crumbling, just cracked, heaved slabs) be a good base for an asphalt floor? >>
If the substrate is that bad you will only wind up with a cracked asphalt floor. Why waste the money? There are real problems that need to be put right before pouring a new floor, like poor drainage. Dividing cost by expected years of service will easily convince you that doing it right will be much less expensive. With home improvement interest rates as low as they now, common sense says do it right. Good luck.
Joe
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"Joe Bobst" > << Would this concrete (not crumbling, just cracked, heaved slabs) be a good

<snip>
right.
My experience is that with interest rates are as low as they are, everyone (or at least it seems like everyone) is trying to get home improvements done. The contractors are so overwhelmed with work, that they can charge as much as they please knowing that if you don't like their quote there are 10 other people out there desperate to get a contractor at any cost.
I wish the interest rate would skyrocket so that I could at least get a or two contractor come out to my house to give me a quote. If I'm lucky enough, I might be able to get a few competitive quotes.
To answer the original question regarding putting asphalt over concrete, as I understand it that would be a bad idea since the coefficients of expansion for the two materials are different and the asphalt would eventually come off the concrete.
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If you look at a highway that had cracks in the concrete and then was fixed with asphalt, you will see what will happen. Not a good idea. It is also difficult to get those large rollers in there.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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yes and no.
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On Wed, 23 Jul 2003 07:13:50 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Pat Kiewicz) wrote:

Thanks to all who replied to my query; I do appreciate the words of wisdom and now will simply wait a while and then commence breaking up the floor myself and figuring out whether to mix and pour my own new concrete or contract out that job. Probably the latter.
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