Armor Glass on Replacement Windows -- does it work?

I am replacing windows that currently have metal bars on them to prevent break-ins (necessary in my neighborhood). A window guy that is giving me an estimate on the job suggested that if I use Armor Glass, I will not need the bars.
1) Is this true? Is Armor glass as safe as metal bars? 2) He is asking an additional $140 per window (2 windows are 24 X 36, the other two are 66 X 34). Is this a reasonable cost? 3) How will the Armor glass affect the Visible Tranmittance (the amount of light coming through). Most of the windows that I have been looking at have a VT of between .5 and .6. Is Armor glass significantly lower?
Thanks in advance for any help.
Andrew
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Your joking right?
Glass vs steel bars that is a tough one. Any type of glass even bullet resistant which this is probably not, can break. All your really doing is slowing down the thief. At least with bars on the windows the bad guys can see them.
I will guess your google is busted again
http://www.regencywindow.com/featuredproduct.asp
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Bad thing about burglar bars is that they often trap the occupants inside if a fire occurs,and it's also sad that one has to barricade ones self in to retain their possessions or stay safe(er).
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Jim Yanik
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Jim Yanik wrote:

I've seen on TV a kind of burlgar bars that are like a hinged steel gate mounted inside the house. A cable-linked, pedal-operated mechanism allows the burglar bars to be unlocked from the inside.
It's not an elegant solution (nor a perfectly safe one -- firefighters would still have a hard time breaking in to rescue unconscious victims), but I think an emergency release of some sort is a must for burglar bars.
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Except that under the stress of a home fire,with the room full of smoke,crawling around on the floor,they still get trapped. Or the mechanism is not exercised and freezes up/rusts.

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Jim Yanik
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Andrew wrote:

Nothing including the bars will keep a determined bad guy out.
I would suggest two things the bars have in their favor. First they are a visual signal that you are taking security serious and may discourage an attempt and they may (depending on design) allow you to open a window and still have some security. On the other side, they can keep you inside in the event of a fire.
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Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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