Are we the only ones getting screwed ?????

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This may be off topic but here goes............
The price of home heating oil here in New Hampshire, USA just hit $3.799 a gallon, up $1.50 since September..... My question is, are we the only ones getting screwed here in the US or has the price gone up as much in other countries around the globe ????? I believe we're getting it shoved up our backsides because of George Bush's war pissing the rest of the world off, but that's just my opinion... Please, I'm not looking to start a long flaming thread here, just interested in what other people in other "non Bush" countries are paying...............
Thanks
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Brian wrote:

Put on another sweater. Our government is not responsible for the world-wide price of oil. Oil is fungible.
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the fast and loose devaluing of our money is at least partially from ru away war spending and the lack of any energy policy at all.
big oil owns the white house and congress, and were getting screwed
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In article

The lack of energy policy is a chronic condition from the 70s forward. Pretty much all of the world's oil fields (including the big ones in Saudi) have passed their peaks and are on the way down.
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High oil prices IS an energy policy (albeit not a planned one--Bush isn't responsible for it) With high oil prices, alternative energy will gain strength. If oil is cheap, we won't change. I've been advocating $5.00 per gallon for gas for some years now. However, I would have like to have seen it gradually, and through taxation, instead of a dollar devaluation and a rise in world consumption.
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snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote:

Virtually every survey shows that the cost of oil is not a deterrent to its use. Oil is not price elastic. Like food, fuel is a necessity and increasing the price - through taxes or supply/demand - only nibbles at the margins.
Doubling the cost of fuel means adding 10% to the cost of almost everything that travels by truck. That translates to about a 30% increase at the retail level.
Alternative energies may gain influence, but there are two things to consider when pinning hopes on such plans:
1. Solar energy is dependent entirely on the earth's distance from the sun*. It would take a solar collector farm the size of the Los Angeles basin to provide electricity for just California.
2. Meddling in the natural order causes unintended consequences. Conversion of traditional crops to grow corn (for example) has contributed to a doubling of rice prices in only one year (now up to $1000/ton from $360 in January 2007). Just this past week, Egypt, Pakistan, and Viet Nam stopped the export of locally grown rice to forstall famine and inflation.
------- *745 watts/sq meter at the equator, at noon, with no clouds. Adjusted for latitude, night, and cloud cover, a solar collector farm in, say, Arizona might average 100-200 watts/sq m.
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What planet do you live on? :-)
Nick
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Sure it's elastic! It's just not IMMEDIATELY elastic. You have to be able to buy the more efficient car, or the alternative transportation has to be made available. At $1.00/gallon, carpooling isn't "reasonable". At $5.00, it sure as heck becomes reasonable. Cheap gas = SUV. Expensive gas = higher mpg car. Europeans live a comfortable lifestyle, and for many years their gas has been at a price that would cause a revolt here in the guzzler nation.

of trucking it all over. Maybe we wouldn't be bottling water in Europe and Hawaii, just so some bunchasnobs can pretend they know the difference.

Put solar on all the roofs in LA, and you make a big difference without taking any land up.

Here, you are absolutely correct. I am not a fan of ethanol from crops, primarily because there isn't sufficient gain in energy after you consider the farming, trucking, processing, fertilizing, water pumping, and land consumption. The price of tortillas for Mexicans has jumped substantially since we started putting corn in our gas tanks. The whole thing is a moneymaker for Archer Daniels Midland, which gets huge subsidies from the feds, even though they make huge amounts of money from the crops. And don't get me started on crop subsidies for the farmers themselves. It's a racket.

Without a collector, people in AZ use fossil or nuclear fuels to cool their homes.
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snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote:

Could we also go back to using freight trains? You know...by train from major place to major place, by truck from major to local.
I seem to remember that worked well.
--

dadiOH
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Sure, but it took a little longer. In this day of instant gratification where things MUST go FedEx red we don't have the patience to wait a few more days. I have seen though, where 53' containers can go by rail and be more economical than straight truck routing. At $4+ for diesel, trains would make a lot of sense. Passenger trains too!
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wrote in message

Not on subject, looks like investing in rail transportation maybe a good long term strategy. Trains are coming back.
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I agree here. In the long term I think it'll also be good for truckers.
I used to hitchhike a lot. B/c of regulations I only rarely got picked up by truckers, and when I did it was usually because they were just dying for someone to talk to and give them some company (sometimes to keep them awake).
On the average, most of them didn't seem to like doing long distance hauls. This was always the case for the married, divorced, and with children truckers. They only rarely got to spend time with their families.
On the other hand, shifting distribution to send freight by train to major population centers (or freight centers), and the serving local areas by truck from these freight centers would drastically improve energy consumption, mean more time at home for the truckers, reduce traffic on the highways, reduce pollution...
Okay, it might take a bit longer. Then the overnight delivery just gets significantly more expensive. I think this is a good trade-off. Also, with automazation technology, and improved routing and tracking, I think we can expect an improvement on the shipping times we used to see.
This could also be combined with high speed shipping of people along major flight-commute routes.
If we keep tacking on %1 - %5 percent reductions in fuel usage, eventually we could be an energy neutral company (produce what we consume). Wouldn't that be great!
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gas wrote:

Another possibility too: ship the trailers by train (like ship containers), off load where needed, pick up a tractor and driver.
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

dirt-common. There are sea-train boxes delivered to factories and industrial parks around here that haven't been opened since they left China or wherever. Don't know the handling steps on that end, but here in CONUS they are offloaded in a port, many times directly to purpose-built rail cars, and go cross-country by train to nearest rail yard set up to pull them off and drop them on a matching semitrailer. I understand some big factories with their own rail spurs can even offload the containers directly from the trains.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

They do
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It is done often, stacked two high. Check out the show "Railroads" on Modern Marvels.
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On Mar 29, 6:12pm, snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote:

Don't get started. You wouldn't have a clue what you're talking about.
Without the government subsidizing our farms, you wouldn't have anything to eat. For 30-odd years, farmers were receiving the same amount of money for their crops, while the price of equipment, fuel, fertilizer all rose with inflation... and that was WITH the government subsidies! It's only recently with the fuel crunch that the prices of crops have risen to where they should've been all along.
You can't have your cheap food and no government subsidies to farmers. It's one or the other. Either quit complaining or pay for your food!
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On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 07:14:04 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Which farmers are you tallking about -- the classic struggling American farm family, or the agribusiness corporate giants with their tentacles into Congress, "stealing" water that was priced for family farms, never for those behemoths.
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The environmental people closing wells, that hasn't helped. Think Alaska, and offshore. I do believe we have oil in the USA that isn't being used.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Mar 31, 3:25 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

The enviros have helped a lot. If the oil isn't pumped now, and energy costs therefore rise, we will have that finite oil a bit longer, while alternatives and efficiency are encouraged. If we pump it all quickly and cheaply, we will run out that much sooner and with fewer alternatives on line.
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