Are these reliable?

I saw these things at Home Depot, which look easier to use than wire nuts, because each wire is inserted separately into its own cavity, and four wires should be no harder than 2. Do you know of any problem with them? Their first use may be to carry 200 or 400 watts to floodlights (or even 800, I have to go check again. That would be 8 separate floodlights**). They're UL approved, but they are so little (flimsy?) I can't help but wonder. And they don't use a screw to hold the wires, just a spring, something like back-stab switches and receptacles.
**He has 8 floodlights installed now and working fine, for more than 10 years. Right now wire-nuts are used. He needs to tap into the system, and if there were no reason not to, it could end up that two of these little connectors each ended up carrying 800 watts.
Assorted means either 2 wires, 3, or 4 connected together. Here is a picture of for 4.
http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?D 2017&Ntt2017&catalogId051&langId=-15&storeId051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN2046%204294965097&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNumber The picture is 2 or 3 times life-size. The enlarged picture is at least 3 times.
They're re-usable, and you can get the old wire out by twisting and pulling, it says, iirc.
This assortment is $4.48, and in good Home Depot fashion, the webpage doesn't say what is assorted about it, or how many items are included, or of what size. And doesn't indicate what gauge wire they work with. The assortment in the store was $1.86 or 1.69, was labeled and actually contained 4 for 4 wires, 4 for 3 wires, and 2 for 2 wires, and it was labeled 18-12. It didn't say that was 18 to 12 *gauge*, but I thought so when I bought them. Nowhere do I see an amp or wattage rating, only wire size, if that's what 18 - 12 is.
Home Depot continues to be tied for first with Lowes for the worst web site of a major retailer. (and maybe of any retailer.)
This is about 133 other things made by Ideal that HD sells, mostly electrician tools; http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/SearchView?catalogId 051&langId=-15&storeId051&N=0&Ntk=level1&Ntt=IDEAL&Nty=1&D=IDEAL&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial&Dx=mode+matchallpartial
--
Ideal push-in wire connectors, 30-291 10-pack assorted.
774A, 18-12 250D
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On 11/16/2010 10:29 PM, Ricky wrote:

http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?D 2017&Ntt2017&catalogId051&langId=-15&storeId051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN2046%204294965097&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNumber
http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/SearchView?catalogId 051&langId=-15&storeId051&N=0&Ntk=level1&Ntt=IDEAL&Nty=1&D=IDEAL&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial&Dx=mode+matchallpartial
They're good, I use them all the time. The two hole connector is wonderful for connecting wires when replacing florescent ballasts.
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

If you are replacing ballasts in a businesses (non-residential) you generally need a disconnect (410.130-G, starting 2005 NEC). An easy device to do it is: http://www.wago.us/products/20480.htm In the HD link I saw that Ideal has them also.
I would be interested how push in connectors are better than receptacle backstabs. They may be great, but my trust level would not be high if you run a lot of current through them. One of the Ideal versions can use #10 wire. (Backstabs are now limited to #14.)
I have more trust for a connector that has a lever lock: http://www.wago.us/products/2631.htm
If a connector is UL listed you should be able to trust it. But backstab receptacles are UL listed.
--
bud--

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On 11/17/2010 9:18 AM, bud-- wrote:

I have some of the Wago lever connectors that come with light fixtures. The connector can act as a disconnect too. I've used them in situations where I need a test connection or something that can easily be swapped out. The push on connectors are UL rated and do the job as designed and I've had no problems with them.
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

I'll bet they didn't come with a fluorescent fixture.
The point of the NEC required disconnect is to allow replacing ballasts and otherwise working on a fixture safely. IMHO with a lever connector you could contact a live bare wire as it is being removed from the connector and would not meet the intent of the NEC. That may not happen if the wire is stripped as the manufacturer recommends, but it could happen if too much insulation is removed. There is a reason at least 2 manufacturers make separable connectors that conform to the code.

As I said, backstab receptacles are UL listed also. I think push on connectors are relatively new. Would be nice to see the results of field experience. Probably took some time for backstabs to get a bad reputation. Most likely lessons have been learned.
--
bud--

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On 11/17/2010 1:42 PM, bud-- wrote:

2X4 lay in fixtures are what the Wago connectors came in. The electrical contractor didn't know how to use them so he cut off the disconnect plugs, tossed the Wago connectors and put wire nuts on everything.
TDD

electrocutions of less than vigilant maintenance personnel who were servicing 277 volt lighting systems. All new fixtures as of Jan 1, 2008 are required to have them as I recall.
http://www.aikencolon.com/Luminaire-Ballast-Disconnects_c_741.html
The disconnect plugs linked above are pushed onto the stripped ends of the power and ballast wires just like push on connectors.
The most frequently used disconnect for me, is a fuse holder and removable fuse in fluorescent fixtures. I wire 1 or 2 into every fluorescent fixture I install or repair.
http://www.idealtruevalue.com/servlet/the-49845/Detail
TDD ======================================================================>> I've used them in situations

I've been using the push on connectors since they hit the market in the last decade and have never had a single problem with them. I don't have an exact date but I remember buying my first container of the Ideal 2 hole connectors some time ago. I've used them in outdoor signs too and have never had one burn up.
TDD
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I don’t know about these but almost every time I have to take out a fifty year old receptacle with a back-stab I have to break it to take the wires out; but then again I’m sure nobody cares what happens fifty years from now.
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Those connectors are in the HALO hi-hats. They make hooking up lights a breeze. Better than trying to wire nut the lights on a ladder.
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Ricky wrote:

http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?D 2017&Ntt2017&catalogId051&langId=-15&storeId051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN2046%204294965097&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNumber
http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/SearchView?catalogId 051&langId=-15&storeId051&N=0&Ntk=level1&Ntt=IDEAL&Nty=1&D=IDEAL&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial&Dx=mode+matchallpartial
How lazy can you get?
--
LSMFT

Simple job, assist the assistant of the physicist.
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On 11/16/2010 11:29 PM, Ricky wrote:

http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?D 2017&Ntt2017&catalogId051&langId=-15&storeId051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN2046%204294965097&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNumber
http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/SearchView?catalogId 051&langId=-15&storeId051&N=0&Ntk=level1&Ntt=IDEAL&Nty=1&D=IDEAL&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial&Dx=mode+matchallpartial
When those connectors first came out, the owner or inventor or someone from the company posted here about them... almost ten years ago. Most people gave him a hard time comparing them to regular backstab type connectors. He said they were much better than the old backstab and they had a "UL" or some type of listing. He even sent me a few to test but I'll be damned if I know what happened to them.
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I've seen them included in several recent light fixtures purchased at the Borg.
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http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?D 2017&Ntt2017&catalogId051&langId=-15&storeId051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN2046%204294965097&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNumber
http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/SearchView?catalogId 051&langId=-15&storeId051&N=0&Ntk=level1&Ntt=IDEAL&Nty=1&D=IDEAL&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial&Dx=mode+matchallpartial
They were included with some can lights I just installed and already attached to the fixture so I used them for the first time a few weeks ago. Sure made the wiring and feed through easy to do. Seemed to work fine and on a lighting only circuit I am sure they will be fine. Don't know if I would use them on a 20 amp circuit or not. I would need to do a bit of research before I did.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit http://www.househomerepair.com
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Just note that they are for solid copper wire only. No stranded (you can't get it in anyway ... don't ask how I know), and no aluminum. For hooking up light fixtures, it would be very useful to have one that take stranded.
Edward
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Edward Reid wrote:

The Ideal ones in the original post are rated for stranded wire: <http://www.idealindustries.com/media/pdfs/products/brochures/p-2854_in-sure_brochure.pdf (205kB) For #16 to #12 wire (and #10 wire for another one) the wire can be up to 19 strand (which is probably the max for branch circuit wires). For #18 wire can be up to 7 strand. (That eliminates extension cord wire).
Wago makes them that also can use stranded wire. #18 probably has to be solid.
(Backstabs are rated for solid wire only.)
I make no representations, expressed or implied, about the usability of these products for applications in the real world using either solid or stranded wire.
--
bud--

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