Are there really people this stupid?

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On 10/25/2015 08:50 PM, Don Y wrote:

I caught the tail end of one of those saint's day processions in the North End. The calamari salad and cannoli were good. I don't remember who the saint of the day was.
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On 10/26/2015 6:41 AM, rbowman wrote:

On our way back from patent office, boss treated us to lunch (north end). [AFAICT, that was the sole compensation we received for signing over our patent rights! :< ] He was Irish, my two colleagues Hungarian and "oriental" (I came from a largely Italian upbringing).
One glance at the menu and my eyes lit up. Waiter came for our order: "I'd like a bowl of pastina, drained with 1/4lb of butter on the side". None of them had ever, apparently seen it. And, all were a bit envious at the gusto with which I *attacked* it!
[OTOH, best Italian restaurant I've visited was in Liverpool. Though a few in NYC were very good!]
One thing the east coast has going for it is true ethnic neighborhoods! Nothing really like that in the midwest or southwest (barring hispanic). Though Chicago has the largest Lithuanian population outside of Vilnius!
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On 10/26/2015 1:38 PM, Don Y wrote:

Born and raised in Philadelphia, I could guess your nationality with amazing accuracy if I knew your address, not your name. On Allegheny Ave there are three RC churches in three blocks. I was probably a teenager before I found out they had names other than the Polish, the Irish, and the German church.
It was also easy to find great ethnic foods in the various neighborhoods too. When we go back, we still shop for some of our favorites that we can't find here in the CT, MA, RI area that I live in.
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On 10/26/2015 06:24 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

We had the French church too. I'm drawing a blank but there was a day around Easter when all the churches decorated. We'd visit around to see who had the best flowers. I think it was some sort of city ordnance that there couldn't be a church and a barroom in the same block, so they alternated. The bars were the same as the churches. Unless you were looking for a fight it never came to that but if you walked into the wrong ethnic crowd there wasn't any red carpet rolled out.
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On 10/26/2015 5:24 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Yup. I used to bring things like fresh kielbasa back from Chicago; a particular type of Italian grated cheese from CT (I've not found it sold anywhere else -- demand?) along with MacCoun apples (and Capital Lunch hot dogs!) One of my favorite meals is "Baked Stuffed Shrimp (stuffed with crab meat)" -- which I've rarely seen on any restaurant menu (let alone expecting them to use Super Colossal shrimp to prepare them!)
Bakeries are the toughest to compensate -- along with certain ingredients.
Fisichelli's (Lawrence, MA) makes a delightful type of biscotti that I've only found in one other place (interestingly, *here*!). Way too expensive to have shipped cross country in the quantities that I'd want (tens of pounds). The "local source" makes them "wrong" -- wrong size *and* wrong flavor. This winter I will set out to "deduce" an appropriate recipe to make them the way *I* like (cuz the local ma & pa bakery that makes them wrong won't share their Rx as a basis for me to *fix* -- and, don't like my "suggestions" for what they are doing "wrong")
I also have to reconstruct another cookie recipe from "taste memory" (a delicate cookie made *from* finely ground almonds). It would be nice to be able to go buy some of each of these things to have a "reference" on hand when I make these attempts!
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On 10/26/2015 07:57 PM, Don Y wrote:

Amaretti?
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On 10/26/2015 10:10 PM, rbowman wrote:

I *think* they're amaretti. But, I will have to make a batch to see if the taste agrees with the "taste memory".
We had lots of cookies and other baked goods that were well known in our communities but never encountered in cookbooks, etc. So, I am not sure how much of it may have been "family recipes" or things brought over from The Olde Country (grandparents were immigrants).
E.g., I can recall looking for caciocavallo (cheese) and getting crazy looks (from *italians* in the North End, no less!) like I was talking nonsense. Or, being redirected to Provolone, instead (close, but no cigar).
There are two types of cookies that I make (in big quantities) over the holidays that are invariably met with something approaching *disgust*, when first encountered. But, within minutes, the disgust is replaced with ADDICTION. One would assume that if folks had encountered them previously, they would remember (the disgust *or* the addiction!)
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On 10/26/2015 11:38 AM, Don Y wrote:

That's no lie. Montana dining has become a little more eclectic but it's still mostly people trying their best to cook ethnic foods from a recipe.
The one I find most amusing is an extended Hmong family that has various food enterprises. They ran a Thai restaurant for a while and then started a mobile operation for fairs, concerts, and so forth. Teriyaki got added to the Thai selections but when they started with the Dutch Funnel Cakes I thought it was getting out of hand.
Nothing new there. I like Greek cuisine but when I lived in NH most of the Greeks were doing Italian. It's what sold.
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On 10/26/2015 6:48 PM, rbowman wrote:

There's a difference when you "cook for yourself" vs. trying to "cook for someone else". For yourself, you cook what you know and have eaten over the years. My "spaghetti sauce" surprises people -- who are used to store-bought (crap!). Yet, there's nothing particularly "interesting" that goes in the pot! I bake biscotti every 2-3 weeks -- usually to replenish SWMBO's "supply" for morning coffee but, also, for friends and neighbors: "Wow! These are the *best* biscotti I've ever had" (sure, all you've ever had was store-bought designed to last on a shelf for 30 days or more!) Yet, the Rx is incredibly trivial; just a fair bit of time and elbow grease...

Ha!

And there's the rub! If you don't have a large XXX community to frequent your XXX restaurant/bakery, then you won't *have* an XXX restaurant/bakery! You *need* the communities to create the markets into which those can exist.
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On Mon, 26 Oct 2015 10:38:27 -0700, Don Y

When I grew up in Chicago there were plenty of "true" ethnic neighborhoods. Italian, German, Polish, Irish, you name it. There's still vestiges of the old neighborhoods.
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On 10/25/2015 9:44 PM, Don Y wrote:

Sure is, if you worship the resurrected, risen Lord instead of the dead one.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
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On 10/26/2015 07:38 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I used to worship the resurrected risen crocuses as they pushed through the snow. Heil Ostara.
It's useful to note which languages use a variation of Ostara like Oster or Easter, and which use something derived from Passover (Pesakh) like Pâques.
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On 10/25/2015 05:06 PM, Phil Kangas wrote:

Some people have no choice but to live in the real world, and celebrate real things. YOU can celebrate figments of your imagination if you want.
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same

coffee

She was a passenger. And the car wasn't moving when she spilled it.

*Nobody* is prepared to drop 190-degree coffee in his/her lap, at any time. And *nobody* should, or even can, drink anything that hot. Have you ever measured the temperature of the coffee coming out of your automatic-drip coffee maker at home, Mark? I have: 161 degrees. And *that's* too hot to drink, before adding cream or milk. This stuff was 30 degrees hotter than that.
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On 10/26/2015 5:49 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

Yes, it is too hot to drink, but not to brew. I bought my wife a Technivorm Moccamaster coffee maker for just that reason. It meets SCAA requirements.
The right temperature: http://www.cnet.com/news/drip-coffee-101-essential-lessons-learned-testing-home-coffeemakers/ As I stated before, the SCAA recommends that a home coffeemaker's brewing water reach the ideal temperature to properly whip up a tasty cup. Specifically the association says a machine's brew temp should hit 197.6 degrees Fahrenheit within the first minute brewing and not exceed 204.8 degrees. Also crucial is for a coffeemaker to expose its grounds to water between 4 and 8 minutes.
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On 10/22/2015 6:34 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Have you NEVER used a screwdriver as a chisel? (who could be that STUPID? A screwdriver isn't designed for that sort of use!)
Ever used a nice, knife-sharp wood chisel to cut metal/aluminum? (who could be that STUPID? What if a shard of metal flew off *or* the brittle chisel tip shattered and a shard flew into your eye?)
Ever watch someone cut *towards* themselves? Or, hold something in one hand while "digging into it" with a tool held in the other hand (which you *know* will probably SLIP and end up in the other PALM)
Leave a loaded weapon around the house where a kid might get it? Forget to leave the safety *on*?
What about folks that pack firearms in their airplane luggage? Who could be *that* stupid?
[I was sitting at a gate many years ago waiting for a flight. The gate was the first on the concourse and close to the magnetometer that (at the time) was used to screen passengers (long before the bomb sniffers, shoe smellers, etc.).
I watched a guy walk up with a "pirate pistol" proudly tucked into his belt (as if he'd a parrot perched on his shoulder). The two state troopers who were stationed at the "checkpoint" quickly lifted him off his feet and *poof* he was gone!
Did he REALLY think folks were going to say, "Wow! What a cool firearm! Sure glad you brought it here for us to see!!"]

People "working" with tools also tend to get distracted, tired and over-focused on the task at hand. At these times, safety precautions and common sense subtly disappear.
I felled a large tree in the front yard. A sizable branch ("bough"?) came down and leaned against the house. No way to move this due to its size. So, ad to cut it in place and hope to pull it off in pieces.
I'd been at this for the better part of an hour in our 100F temperatures. Of course, never remembering to drink as much as one *should* in those conditions. And, getting tired and eager to be "done".
At one point, I looked up and saw my left hand above my head steadying the bough while my right hand -- also above my head -- was holding the chainsaw and trying to cut the bough at that point.
- bough is GOING to move when its been weakened by the saw - bough runs downward to the left (high spot off to right) - chainsaw is too heavy to be using single-handed - my left arm, head and neck are likely places for the saw to "wander into" WHEN it decides it doesn't want to stay where I've positioned it.
Turn off saw and go inside. If you let yourself get into a situation that potentially dangerous, you are over-tired and WILL hurt yourself.
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wrote:

Not exactly, but last summer I was camping and some guy had a whole chicken on his campfire. While the chicken was cooking, he was drinking large amounts of beer and hard liquor. Eventually he staggered over to the fire, grabbed the chicken, placed it on a picnic table, and grabbed a huge knife which was about 20 inches long, with a blade around 2 inches wide. He began to hack at the chicken, when he dropped the knife. It fell point down, and went right thru one of his bare feet.
He screamed and put his foot on the table. Blood was spurting everywhere, and covered the table as well as the chicken. His buddy grabbed a towel and wrapped the foot, but blood kept pouring out. The buddy said he needs to go to the hospital, but the drunk took another swig of liquor and said he refused to go to the hospital. Someone came over and duct taped the foot, but blood still poured out and by this time the whole ground was covered with blood, and the guy fell to the ground.
Fortunately, his wife got there just about that time, and she took one look at his foot, and called 911. He was rushed to the hospital. The doctor said that he cut a major blood vessel and had lost half his blood. Another 10 minutes he would have bled out and died.
Lots of stitches and some surgery, he did survive. The chicken was tossed in the trash, he was taken home and his buddies had to pack up his camping gear. His wife took that knife and said he will never see it again.
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On 10/22/2015 2:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Terrible story about the chicken. They could have washed the chicken and put it back on the fire for a few minutes. Blood is edible.
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Per Don Y:

Something over 50 years ago, a guy that lived in our house was from Texas.... and he carried this loaded Colt 1911 with him 24-7.... kept it under his pillow or something at nite.
We asked him "Dallas, how did you get that thing over here ?"..
His reply "Ahhhh...I just tucked into my boot....".
--
Pete Cresswell

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Per (PeteCresswell):

Should have added: this was in Hawaii....
--
Pete Cresswell

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