Are old microwave ovens built better than the new ones?

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On Thu, 25 Sep 2008 05:26:47 -0700 (PDT), terry

Yes, that is only spelling.

I have been a licensed electronic tech since... well, a very, very long time. I've probably serviced more microwave ovens than you have ever seen.

I imagine far more people have been injured by stoves and ovens than microwaves.
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On Sep 25, 10:49 am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Hi there sa......@ dog etc.
And probably way more than I have also, so I will defer to your greater technical/electronic expertise.
But it really does worry when someone who possibly doesn't know DC from AC; the kinda of competent, perhaps, do it yourself person, but who posts on this news group that they are measuring 38 volts using a DMM on a dead wire due to capacitive pickup of AC voltages etc.
And then opens up a 1000 watt microwave (essentially a very high frequency radio transmitter inside a metal box) with DC voltages of up to 5000* volts and ampere capacity of at least 100* milliamps or more (certainly enough to kill somebody) and starts tinkering and exposing themselves to microwave radiation.
Also if they do fix it perhaps not getting the cover back on with those RF sealing edges, and not realising that it matters?
For example: One person said something about getting a few screws to put a microwave cover back on. That's rather like digging around in the garage and putting whatever kind of old engine oil one finds into a perfectly good car motor! Most wouldn't do it eh?
So yes; while I am an older and somewhat out of date (tube era) electronics technician and I've fixed a few m.waves, if my neighbour (who has only a few clues about 'any' electrcity) started messing with his microwave I'd stop him for his own safety.
Safety first? Reference ' * '; that's 43 times the voltage and at least some 3 times the current that GFIs are required to operate for human safety. In other words while most posters are no doubt smart and sensible and apart from microwave radiation (you wouldn't stand in front of a radar!) they can kill you.
So; not preaching just warning. OK?
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wrote:

Microwave ovens don't have cathode ray tubes unless you've installed a video game into one or perhaps you have a combination microwave oven and television set.
They use a tube called a magnetron and usually the power supply will give out long before the magnetron has degraded enough to be noticeable.
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It's not worth fixing a microwave, but I do think the older, American Made ones like my vintage 1989 Tappan are way better than the Chinese junk you can only buy today. And I also happen to know one other person with my exact same microwave. Still in service after all this time.
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zzyzzx wrote:

My 1982? Samsung sitting on the kitchen counter still works fine. It'll likely outlive me.
-- aem sends...
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I repaired my 1980 Sharp 650W uwave about 8 yrs ago,cost of $25 in parts. VERY cost-efficient.
and it has a larger(taller) oven cavity than current ovens.
--
Jim Yanik
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They dropped off a lightning struck Amana in our shop. The clock was fried. We drilled a hole right through the center of the key pad and installed a spring wound timer. It worked like that for years.
We were able to keep all the door interlocks functioning. That was our only concern..
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On Thu 25 Sep 2008 09:12:36p, Jim Yanik told us...

I assume you're happy with it, but a 650 watt oven is sadly under-powered by today's standards. I'm sure that there must be some current models with a taller cabinet than others.
We have two m/w's, one 1000 watt over-the-range model which I consider perfectly adequate, and a second 1350 watt countertop model which I really prefer. The over-the-range unit has a tall enough cavity to accomodate any container I use, and is tall enough to handle two levels of cooking if the rack is inserted.
It's nice to save money, but I prefer advances in technology.
--
Wayne Boatwright

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wrote:

Unless you like to heat and eat rocks, more power isn't desirable.
I rarely use full power. I'd rather eat my food than scrape it off the walls of the microwave oven. I cook my morning breakfast cerial at power 4 and use 5 or 6 for everything else.
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On Fri, 26 Sep 2008 08:35:01 -0500, AZ Nomad

There is only one actual power level. The manetron is either FULL ON, or it's not on at all. The "power level control" simply changes the duty cycle of FULL-ON/FULL-OFF.
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No shit sherlock.
However if one has to run it at a 50% duty cycle instead of a 70% duty cycle to prevent the food from ending up along the walls of the microwave oven, then the increased power isn't providing the slightest benefit.
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On Fri, 26 Sep 2008 09:20:09 -0500, AZ Nomad

I don't seem to have those problems, sherlock.
Modern recipes as well as instructions on packaged foods are all based on higher wattage ovens, not what some dopey hermit in the woods uses.
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All irrelevent.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com writes:

True of conventional microwave ovens, but not the Panasonic Inverter models. All power settings from 30-100% run the magnetron continuously, but vary some tube operating parameter to adjust the RF output. The 10% and 20% settings are implemented by 1/3 and 2/3 duty cycle at the 30% power level.
I can cook a single egg in an open bowl in the Panasonic at 30% power without it exploding.
    Dave
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On Fri 26 Sep 2008 10:29:48p, Dave Martindale told us...

I *love* my Panasonic Inverter. I've had my countertop model for about 5 years. When we moved into a new house a year and a half ago, it was equipped with a very nice full-featured over-the-range microwave. I kept the Panasonic since we had plenty of counter space, and I rarely use the other unit unless what I'm cooking calls for full power, or using just the "keep warm" setting, which works quite well.
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Wayne Boatwright

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On Fri 26 Sep 2008 06:35:01a, AZ Nomad told us...

There are lots of things that I cook at power 2, 3, or 4. I also cook virtually everything covered, so there's no mess in the oven cavity regardless of power setting. However, full power at high wattage is great for quickly bringing liquid based items to a boil, then lowering the setting for longer cooking. Not to mention that the higher the wattage, the better popcorn pops and with virtually no unpopped kernels. This is true whether it's prepackaged m/w popcorn, or using a m/w popcorn popper with regular popcorn, with or without oil. Cooking bacon is no messier at high power than at lower settings.
Today, cooking times for packaged frozen foods are usually calibrated for ovens of 1000-1200 watts. Take a look at the packages. The final product cooks better at the appropriate wattage, rather than having to adjust the timing up to compensate for low power.
We jave 650 watt Amana microwaves in our break room at work. I *hate* cookingin them.
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Wayne Boatwright

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AZ Nomad wrote:

I had the same problem until I discovered food-covers.
For example, a lid from a Folger's plastic coffee "can" fits neatly over my soup bowls. An upside-down tupperware bowl fits over saucers. And so on. When the food explodes, bumps, or turns inside-out, the mess ends up on the covering device, not on the MW's walls.
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The the lid pops off, and the food ends up on the tray.
Sorry. I prefer my food in a dish, not scraped off the tray.
Variable power (duty cycle for salty's anal analysis) has been around since the 70's with good reason.
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Oh good lord, just cover whatever it is with a paper towel...."problem" solved.
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Ron wrote:

Chuckle. Not always. This house came with an over-the-stove micro, which I hardly ever use, in favor of my old Samsung. I tried covering a dish with a paper towel once, at a medium power setting, and the paper towel caught on fire.
-- aem sends...
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