Are name-brand low-energy fluorescent "Green" bulbs any brighter than store brand?

Page 1 of 4  
Just got a 4-pack of the Walmart "Great Value" version of these energy- saver style fluorescent 23w bulbs which they claim are equivalent to a 100w incandescent bulb. Not even close. It's about like a 40w bulb.
Are the name brand bulbs of this type any better?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doc wrote:

A 23 watt CFL lamp should put out a great deal of light. One thing I have found when dealing with a number of CFL lights is the fact that the lamps have a warm up period. The colder the ambient temperature the more time it takes the darn things to reach full brightness. I've installed them in the bathroom exhaust fan/light fixtures at several business because of the long life of the lights and soon discovered that in the wintertime it's like a 40 watt incandescent until about 10 minutes later when it's as bright or brighter than a 100 watt standard bulb. In the summertime, flip the switch and it as bright as ever. I imagine that the more expensive CFL lamps will perform better over a wider temperature range.
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I like that "feature" in the bathroom, because the light doesn't blind me as badly when I turn it on at night...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Okay, I see it gets considerably brighter with time. However, this seems like something of an annoyance if I want there to be light *now*. Sort of like revisting TV's that need warming up or something.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doc wrote:

On the other hand, it has the advantage of not immediately blinding you when you flip the light on in the dark.
It takes some adjustment, but after a few weeks, you'll probably no longer even notice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Indeed. When we built out house my wife had them put in special switches that slowly raise the light level because she hates being blinded. When we started switching to CFLs on other lights we hardly noticed.
Some brands are much quicker than others, too. And some lines within a brand. Unfortunately no one puts "full brightness in 47 seconds!" on the packages.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
WDS wrote:

Actually last time I was in Lowe's I actually did see some "quick start" CFLs. I don't remember the brand name though, nor did I buy any, as most of the fixtures in my house already have CFLs in them and those that don't are a) rarely used and b) slated for replacement anyway.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They may be referring to starting instantly instead of taking half a second or a second to preheat their filaments. They almost certainly still need to warm up.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Because the time varys with the temperature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
WDS wrote:

There is a general trend for ones with outer bulbs to start dimmer and take more time to warm up than ones with bare tubing. Ones with outer bulbs have their tubing designed to work best at the higher temperature that occurs inside the bulb-enclosed ones.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 30, 12:04pm, snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

Oddly the ones we have the get to full brightness the fastest and the slowest are the ones in "more traditional" packaging (i.e., with an outer shell around the twisty one).
BTW, one more thing to do is in a multi-bulb fixture put in one incandescent bulb to provide immediate brightness.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(Don Klipstein) wrote:

Oddly the ones we have the get to full brightness the fastest and the slowest are the ones in "more traditional" packaging (i.e., with an outer shell around the twisty one).
BTW, one more thing to do is in a multi-bulb fixture put in one incandescent bulb to provide immediate brightness.
_____________________
I tried this in a multi-bulb fixture that has a ceiling fan when I first went towards CFLs. It did make a good transition for me at the time, but after a while I just swapped out that bulb for the CFL too. I just got used to the lighting timing all over the house now. Tomes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Okay, I see it gets considerably brighter with time. However, this seems like something of an annoyance if I want there to be light *now*. Sort of like revisting TV's that need warming up or something.
reply:
Doctor to patient, "You need to give up wine, women, and song."
Patient, "Will I live any longer?"
Doctor, "No, but it will seem like one hell of a lot longer."
All this bullshit and hooey to save a few pennies here and there, and so little kids won't eat used up light bulbs and die.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So, the problem is easily solved. Buy incandescents. CFL lights use a lot less electricity and last years longer than incandescents. The trade off is that you have to wait a minute for the full light to come on. If it bothers you that much, get rid of them. Problem solved. That is like saying I want a Toyota Prius but you cant stand that you cant fit giant boxes when you purchase something from Home Depot. Simple answer, buy a gas guzzling SUV.
Tony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have used a lot of CFLs (of different brands) and have not had any that take more than a second or two to come on, until recently (these are flood lights).

--
21 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mine are also floodlights. In the cold they first turn on with a dark purple, Deep Purple ? Seems like they don't have it down quite right as far as light concentration for more of a spot.
I have several around the house I never turn off, and one in the front yard. Its a standard CFL inside one of those metal glass protective domes, completely incased. I'm sure it gets hot in the middle of a summer day. I intend on hooking up a photosensor, but that might make it burn out more quickly. I'll find out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

CFLs with outer bulbs have a general trend of starting dimmer and taking longer to warm up than ones with bare tubing. The tubing in ones with outer bulbs is formulated to work best at a higher temperature.

The light from the reflector is less concentrated, because the initial source (spiral of tubing) is larger and less intense than a filament.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 5 Dec 2008 01:36:32 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

Seems true here. All the plain CFLs I've used would warm up in a couple of seconds. The floodlights (look like regular CFLs inside enclosures) take awhile.

--
20 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In wrote: > So, the problem is easily solved. Buy incandescents
Better move quickly.
The "Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007" applies performance standards to incandescent bulbs which supposedly will effectively ban them in a few years.
I've tried to read it but it consists mainly of a lot of edits to existing regulations, like this:
(1) DEFINITION OF GENERAL SERVICE INCANDESCENT LAMP- Section 321(30) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (42 U.S.C. 6291(30)) is amended-- (A) by striking subparagraph (D) and inserting the following: bla bla bla ...
so it's not clear to me exactly what's going on.
Still, there's the "Light Bulb Freedom of Choice Act", H.R.5616, which claims to "repeal of the phase out of incandescent light bulbs."
--
Bert Hyman St. Paul, MN snipped-for-privacy@iphouse.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.