Are electric oil-filled radiator heaters a carbon monoxide risk?

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On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 06:55:01 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

Hey Ransley, Go to www.coexperts.com and read. You will find out just how well your goverment is taking care of us with CO detectors. CO Levels that dont alarm until you can be sick. Why? Stupid really. Keep in mind though, you wont pay $25 or $35 for a CO detector at www.coexperts.com. $100 will get you one. Just read and then make your own conclusions. Bubba
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I agree with the high Co needed to alarm issues being wrong, in not being displayed or alarmed somehow at levels above Zero, as in 1ppm., but there is a reason for that. An example is years ago when something like 10-14000 false alarms in Chicago were called in because of a temperature inversion in 24 hrs. I always recommend using the Peak memory function. To me what is important is they do monitor Co and record any level higher than Zero, I agree Zero is what it should be. A dual range dual alarm type is needed. My heavy cooking can sometimes make a 1-3 ppm reading for a minute, it should be noted with say lights flashing. maybe you know of sensors that are better. Best would be like my " VOC indoor air quality monitor" from Oregon Scientific, it logs a 8 hr graph of levels. When we didn`t have what we have now, many more people got sick.
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Bubba, our government is not supposed "to be taking care of us." That is a job best left to ourselves.
--James--
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Hey Ransley, Go to www.coexperts.com and read. You will find out just how well your goverment is taking care of us with CO detectors.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

How much do you go outside for fresh air. Your heat does not have combustion, how could it have CO problem? If you want to prove it, just turn it off for a day, then you'll know. Tony
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

There is no carbon monoxide (CO) associated with any electric heating device. CO is product of incomplete burning of gas, oil, wood, kerosene, and other fuels.
There is absolutely no way you can get carbon monoxide from an oil filled electric heater.
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Is there even a vent into the oil tank?
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