Are BOX fans dangerous????

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On Wed, 11 Aug 2010 11:25:38 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

Yep, you're right..... The cave better be sealed to prevent pollution from getting in too.
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On Mon, 9 Aug 2010 21:26:32 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

My box fan has been running around the clock for nearly 3 months now. It only gets shut off when I leave for a weekend, or during rain storms when I need to shut the window. Otherwise it sucks air thru the house 24/7. I cant afford the electricity to run a window Air Conditioner. Box fans use little energy compared to an AC.
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On Aug 10, 11:44 pm, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Yep. But just look how much safer you would be without the box fan...lets see, known problem (not the 'could have' 'might have' problems) divided into the population equals? I guess some vanishingly small chance of it causing a problem.
Harry K
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On Wed, 11 Aug 2010 11:27:34 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

Well, just to be really safe, I am going to have a welder make a solid steel box to put the fan inside. I figure it needs to be at least 1/2 inch thick solid steel with no holes anywhere. The cord will go thru a piece of well pipe and be connnected right to a breaker in the breaker panel directly, because plugs can create resistance and thus heat, and fire.
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On Sun, 8 Aug 2010 21:14:52 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

fans. Using them as such is a misuse.
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On Aug 9, 10:50 am, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Says who?
Harry K
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On Mon, 9 Aug 2010 21:24:55 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

to sit on the floor.
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What happens to them if you sit them on a window sill? I've seen many used like that; I'd guess millions nationwide are in windows. I've never seen a caution about not using them in a window.
However, I did find this on Lasko's web site: http://www.laskoproducts.com/prodinfo/faq-fans.html Can I use my Box Fan in a window? Most box fans are not designed for use in a window
Note the word "most" as opposed to using the word "no".
And the don't give any specifics here What is a Window Fan? A fan mounted in a window to circulate the air. Window fans are used for air intake, air exhaust, or air exchange. The blade size ranges from 8" to 16"
Then, you have this that tells you how to use a box fan in the window. http://www.wikihow.com/Use-Window-Fans-for-Home-Cooling Place fans in windows. Close the window as tightly as possible around the fan to hold it in place and prevent local circulation
Of course, this box fan is designed for use in windows http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId051&productId0405666&langId=-1&catalogId053&ci_sku0405666&ci_src110944&cm_mmc=shopping-_-google-_-D29X-_-100405666&locStoreNum&24&marketID9
Evidently, geeks don't know everything, even wise ones http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-box-fan.htm Many homeowners also choose to place a box fan in an open window, similar to an air conditioning unit. If the home owner places the box fan in the window so the front faces outdoors, the box fan will draw warm air out from inside the home. If the homeowner places the box fan with the front facing inside, the fan with draw in air from outside..
You can even rent one for $3 a day http://www.loanables.com/items/show/132--Box-fan-that-fits-in-window-Austin-TX
And some people just love them in the window http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/42792/review_of_the_lasko_20_box_fan_economical.html One feature my Lasko 20” box fan has is its compact design. It fits very well in my window. I can use it to bring in the cooler air from the outside. This works remarkably well. This is known as an economical in-window air conditioner. Another nice thing about its size is the fact that it is not cumbersome to carry out of the store. It fits into my trunk perfectly, also.
My Lasko 20” box fan is also lightweight. Considering its size, I found that very surprising. It also is very welcomed.
Seems like you have a big job ahead convincing people to take the box fans out of the window.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

A window fan is intended to seal the window space so it can inhale as well as exhale.
Placed a few inches from a screen, a box fan won't inhale much through the screen but will exhale very well through the screen. This can be demonstrated by dangling a piece of toilet paper beside the fan. If it's blowing toward the screen, there won't be much air movement beside the fan. If it's blowing into the room, the toilet paper will probably be sucked toward the screen and into the fan. The viscosity of still air makes it hard to reach the fan through the screen, so air from the room is sucked around behind the fan.
When a fan exhales toward a screen, the velocity of the air will carry it right through. A fan 6" from a screen will do better than one 6' from the screen because the velocity will be greater at the shorter distance.
A 20" box fan should exhale twice as efficiently as a 10" window fan. The smaller fan would have to impart 4 times the velocity to blow the same volume as the larger fan, and that means 16 times the energy.
I have a couple of loops of cord tied through the top of my 9-pound box fan. It takes just a moment to hang it from hooks at the top of my kitchen window, where the air is hottest and most humid and there may be smoke in the event of a cooking mistake. If I want to cool the house, I walk outside and feel for any movement of air. If there's air coming from the direction of that window, I'll put the fan on a table in a window on the other side of the house. No use fighting Mother Nature.
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Who would be willing to fork-out $200 for this Made in USA product?
http://www.electric-fan.com/fans/9166D /
Lasko and Lakewood are made in America from foreign and domestic parts. My box fans are Lasko and more than 10 years old and no issues or complaints.
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Bob Villa wrote:

Air King is now a Lasko subsidiary. The 9166 made its name as a fan that would blow 7000 cfm. Evidently, the construction wasn't good enough for that much power; bearings seized, blades cracked, and grilles broke. So they put on a wimpy motor for which they claim 3650 cfm.
I believe the Lasko 20-Inch Premium Box Fan ($24 at Amazon) claims 3623 cfm for only 150 watts. The manufacturer claims it blows 30% more than other fans. In that case, it would need more stability. Indeed, it is heavier and deeper than typical of plastic box fans. The 28 reviewers seem to have a consensus that it blows more than other box fans they've owned.
I once tested box fans for thrust by weighing them, hanging them by 6 feet of cord in the carport, and seeing how far back they moved when I turned them on. From pounds of thrust and diameter I could compute cfm.
I remember my 9-pound Holmes was very wimpy compared to my antique 24-pound Lau. Dadburnit, I'm getting knocking from the Lau motor now! I think the bearings are no longer handling the thrust. If I could find a replacement motor, it would be expensive. I wonder if it's easy to get bearings for a motor with a 3/8" shaft.
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On Tue, 10 Aug 2010 22:29:04 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski"

It's a WIKI - take it with a few grains of salt. Any moron can write anything and look like an expert.

It is designed that it will stand up to weather IF used in a window - still not designed "as" a window fan - but unlike "most" the fan is weatherproofed like a windowe fan motor.

The same lasko as sold by Home depot - it is ACTUALLY an indoor-outdoor fan - designed to be used on patios etc, not as a window fan - but as such it is safer than MOST box fans if you are going to use one in a window. Also considerably smaller than the "average" box fan, at 22" overall, with a 20 inch blade

job - http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xr5/R-202019811/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053, as well as a better, electrically reversible window fan that is still quite affordable - http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xr5/R-202182983/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
And then there is Lasko's window fan that allows you to close the window without removing the fan http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xr5/R-100405673/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
I suspect there is a good reason they sell "window fans" as well as "box fans" - different horses for different courses.
You could pull a plough with a thotougbred, and you could take a Clydesdale to the sulky track - but neither is optimal, or even close, for the job.
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On Sun, 08 Aug 2010 19:25:30 -0700, Ron wrote:

Ceiling fans have an induction motor the same as most any household fan. So if it's the motor you fear take a look up.
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If anyone is really interested in anything more than flapping their gums, the URL is for a 2003 Consumer Products Safety Commission report on this very subject. http://www.cpsc.gov/LIBRARY/FOIA/FOIA03/os/portfan.pdf
There were an estimated 4,500 fires associated with portable electric fans from 1990 through 1998. These fires resulted in more than 20 deaths, 270 injuries, and about $55 million in property loss.
Staff reviewed 243 fan-related In-Depth Investigations (IDIs), conducted from January 1, 1990 through April 12, 2001. These IDIs included those in which the identified hazard was fire (210), potential fire (16), electrocution (12), electric shock (3), and electrical hazards (2).
reported sales of portable electric fans have been in the range of 17 to 20 million per year with an average life expectancy of fans is 12 years. Based on this information, staff estimates there are about 200 to 240 million portable fans in use in U.S. households. Thus the odds don't seem all that good.
--
I want to find a voracious, small-minded predator
and name it after the IRS.
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about 500 fires a year and 2 deaths. Check out how many car accidents that result in death in a single year. Somewhere around 40,000. Not to count the number of accidents that result in injuries and money cost.
You are more likely to die just going to the store to get the fan than for it to cause a fire or death. It is even estimated that about 50 to 100 deaths each year are caused by peanuts.
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I wonder how those 243 incidens compare with other hazards such kitchen fires started by leaving stuff on the stove, other small electrical appliances, etc.
From what I am seeing the "Oh My God! Get rid of yur box fan!" crap is a tempest in a tea pot.
Harry K
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You can read about it here: http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files//PDF/Cookingfactsheet.pdf
About 500 deaths from kitchen fires per year and 4600 injuries and $ 756 million in property damage.
Guess we will quit cooking and eat out. Oops can not do that because of death by automobile. Just quit eating. Sure hope that death rate is lower.
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Time we eliminate _everything_ that has caused a few deaths in the house it will be nothing but a bare concrete slab...oops can't use that either. people have died pouring it.
There is paranoia and then there is outright idiocy - case in point 'box fan' Harry K
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

window fans.
Several cases seem to remain mysteries. There's soot but no other evidence of overheating. There's evidence of overheating, but the motor turns freely.
Fans are supposed to be protected from overheating in the event of a locked rotor, and the ones tested have worked.
Cords are often the problem. Some people I know will continue to use a cord when there's a warm spot.
It looks as if most problems would be minor of there were an adult present to smell trouble and unplug the fan.
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a ceiling fan motor is probably built more robustly than a cheap box fan motor. CF's are made to be installed "permanently",and thus made better than a throwaway $20 box fan. It's also away from physical abuse that a floor fan may suffer,no getting knocked over,stuff spilled on it.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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