Arc welding question

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110amps will weld 1/8" steel. Any thicker and you'll not be getting a proper penetration.
steve

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DPB brought up another important point. DUTY CYCLE. Learn what it is and understand it. Most the cheaper welders are of a low duty cycle %. If they are less than say 60%, you won't be getting much done. Our hobart is rated 100%. They are hard to find now a days.
steve

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Steve Barker DLT wrote:

More importantly find the duty cycle curve for the welder in question as there is not a single duty cycle. As an example, my Syncrowave 250 is rated at 40% duty cycle at 250A, 60% duty cycle at 200A, and 100% duty cycle at about 150A. The bulk of my welding falls within the 100% duty cycle range.
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On Nov 26, 3:59�pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

a buddy welds heavy stuff with 3 car batteries in series.
nice smooth DC weld, low cost he says its easy.
he has used this for years
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a buddy welds heavy stuff with 3 car batteries in series.
nice smooth DC weld, low cost he says its easy.
he has used this for years
********************************************************************************************************************
Many years ago, as a teenager, I used 3 "junk" car batteries in series with jumper cables to hold the rods to do all the repairs on my homemade gokart. It seemed easier then than welding with my well used 250 amp AC/DC miller these days.
Of course, the sun burn was worse back then. I am a little smarter now.
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http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId051&langId=-1&catalogId053&productId0648191
Look down the road. If you just need a box to weld sheet metal, you can get a lot of them that will do it.
That being said, the next thing is lifespan. How long will this box last? Will you be buying another in six months, or will you be stuck because it doesn't work and you can't get any replacement parts or consumables? (hint: you won't have this problem with the major manufacturers)
Now, how much do you rely on it? Do you use it once a month? Once a year? Six hours a day?
Are you going to outgrow it soon? Say, start to make gates and railings? And this cheapo won't do it or die first? Now you have a boat anchor and have to go out and buy a real machine, and have just flushed $$ down the tube. 110 will do the thin stuff, and do it well, but you may want to do thicker stuff when you start learning.
Assess your needs, both today, and a year from now. Buy accordingly. It's cost effective.
Also, consider used, as you could probably buy a good used machine.
Steve
AWS certified 2g, 3g, 4g, 6g, 6gtig, 2gfcaw caisson, and others I forgot. Former steel erection contractor, and welding since 1974.
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On Nov 26, 5:59pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

The spec for the item mentioned is:
Input: single phase 240 volt/60 Hz Stepless current regulation: 45Amps-110Amps Amperage: 110 Automatic overload protection MFG Brand Name : Pro Series MFG Model # : AWELD110 MFG Part # : AWELD110
So the 'input' will require something of the order of the same as a typical clothes dryer.
Namely 230 volts at 30 amp: 230 x 30 = 6,900 watts maximum.
The 'output' while welding will be of the order of 15 to say 50 volts at a maximum of 110 amps, 50 x 110 = 5500 watts.
Probably quite sufficient for a 'do it your self' home welder.
However; if one is going to set up to build utility trailers, build scaffolding or do minor construction work the unit may not be durable or sufficiently sturdy?
Looks like welder prices have come down substantially in recent years? China?
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wrote:

The spec for the item mentioned is:
Input: single phase 240 volt/60 Hz Stepless current regulation: 45Amps-110Amps Amperage: 110 Automatic overload protection MFG Brand Name : Pro Series MFG Model # : AWELD110 MFG Part # : AWELD110
So the 'input' will require something of the order of the same as a typical clothes dryer.
Namely 230 volts at 30 amp: 230 x 30 = 6,900 watts maximum.
The 'output' while welding will be of the order of 15 to say 50 volts at a maximum of 110 amps, 50 x 110 = 5500 watts.
Probably quite sufficient for a 'do it your self' home welder.
However; if one is going to set up to build utility trailers, build scaffolding or do minor construction work the unit may not be durable or sufficiently sturdy?
Looks like welder prices have come down substantially in recent years? China?
Yes, and you get what you pay for. Light duty 110 machines made of plastic are relatively cheap. If you shop professional equipment, you will discover the price is right up there where it always was.
Steve
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i got a 110v lincoln 135 at hd . you can get by with the flux core wire unless its really thin stuff your welding. but that said, for thicker than 3/16 steel, i find i need to use my lincoln 220 buzzbox . you just cant get the penetration you need on thicker stuff with a 110v mig. but ive welded 30 minutes at a time with the mig on high setting and it didnt kick off. i dont agree stick welding is harder to do , harder on thin stuff yes. lucas
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On Nov 30, 7:53am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

I've read about this on several web pages. Not sure what to think. Out of respect I'll take the advice of the people in this thread and buy a 230V mig welder. I'm sure there's more detail I'm forgetting, like you said stick welding is harder for thin stuff. I'm sure that's true.
Hey, if mig welding's good enough for American Chopper, then who am I to complain, no? They showed Mikey learning to mig weld in no time. It seems everyone on tv shows use migs. Maybe they don't like cleaning slag.
Thanks everyone for all the great info! Anon
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It just all depends on what you are doing. You won't find a MIG on a powerplant site doing boiler repair. It's all done with stick. You will be better off with stick trying to repair rusty metal such as farm repair projects. Also, you won't get much of a good weld OUTSIDE with a MIG. Unless it's just dead still, the wind will blow your shield away.
s
as for american chopper, well that bs show is all scripted anyway. AND you won't find MIG being used on any frame that is of any great quality. TIG is used for things like that.

I've read about this on several web pages. Not sure what to think. Out of respect I'll take the advice of the people in this thread and buy a 230V mig welder. I'm sure there's more detail I'm forgetting, like you said stick welding is harder for thin stuff. I'm sure that's true.
Hey, if mig welding's good enough for American Chopper, then who am I to complain, no? They showed Mikey learning to mig weld in no time. It seems everyone on tv shows use migs. Maybe they don't like cleaning slag.
Thanks everyone for all the great info! Anon
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Steve Barker DLT wrote:

On AC, if you pay attention you'll see that the MIG is used as the quick and dirty "hot glue gun" to tack things together for fitup, and then once everything it together they got over and finish weld everything with TIG. Of course since the shit head producers show more and more fights and less and less building, I don't doubt they don't show any of the finish welding anymore. I expect the newer episodes just show a few tank bits boogered together with MIG and the next shot it's all finished and painted so they have more time for idiots yelling at each other.
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Ya got that right. MIG is okay on anything you aren't betting your life on.
Steve
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Does that include flux cored gasless? This 220V MIG welder can do both argon and gasless,
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=55525
Thanks, Anon
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FWIW, anyone that wants quality discussion with real welders, check out sci.engineering.joining.welding.
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