AprilAire Humidifier?

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Let's see, on one side there are about 6 of us, many who have actual units, plus Aprilaire the manufacturer. On the opposing side, there is hmmm, just Bubba, with his opinions, grounded in what?
Who thinks that because the water exiting the humidifier is luke warm means that using hot water doesn;t result in more evaporation. Here's a clue: Evaporation causes cooling. So, while the water exiting when you use hot water may be close in temp to the temp when using cold water, that says nothing about how much water was evaporated. And as anyone with any grounding in science knows, (that excludes u bubba), more water will evaporate when u use hot water, rather than cold.
It's the most basic science. As someone asked, what planet do u live on bubba, where cold water evaporates as fast as 130 deg water?
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Maybe because we actually went to physics classes and know your theory is all wet.
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On Tue, 25 Nov 2008 16:59:31 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@columbus.rr.com wrote:

You?........hardly. Bubba
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-snip-
So, Bubba- Could you explain the physics in your universe where you can convert 56degree H2O to a vapor as quickly as you can convert 120degree H2O?
Jim [bet you also have one of those freezers where hot water freezes faster than cold?]
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wrote:

Obviously another idiot that hasnt tested a thing on his own. Bite me and read my other post. Bubba
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We have read your posts, which hurl insults instead of answering simple questions. We're still waiting for an answer to the simple question of what universe you live in where hot water does not evaporate at a faster rate than cold water? And why is it if hot and cold water evaporate just as easily that clothes dryers HEAT the clothes instead of just tumbling them and passing air over them?
Your lack of grounding in science leads you to erroneous conclusions. Like thinking that the fact that the water leaving the humidifier is not hot supports your case. It does not. Evaporation causes the water to cool. Starting with hot water, MORE water will evaporate and the water leaving after it's journey across the media pad can still be at about the same temp as it would if cold water was used, yet more humidity is going into the air.
This is elementary school science. And the notion that Aprilaire has some reason to lie about this is particularly funny. Let's see, they can be lying when they recommend hot water to increase capacity and sell a customer a unit that is too small which they will not be happy with, have help line calls, returns, etc. Or if it were true that hot water doesn't increase the capacity, they could just say that and sell a bigger, more expensive unit and have a satisfied customer. Does lying about this sound like a good business practice to you?
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On Wed, 26 Nov 2008 04:34:18 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Your EE gets you squat with this one. Very simple. Try what I said. How hard is it to take some measurements and strap on another cheap saddle valve to switch from hot to cold? Stop flapping your lips and try the experiment. Oh wait, thats right. It was on the internet so it has to be true. Bubba
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IIRC, you said the water leaving the humidifier was always cold, whether it started out hot or cold. That seems odd... With lots of extra water flow to avoid mineral buildup, you'd think the hot water would come out hotter. With less flow, you'd think both would come out close to the furnace air temp.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

There is so much evaporative cooling that the water that is wasted does come out cool. Next time I'm in my basement I'll measure the temperature.
Boden
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This is a great topic and I side with the hot water crowd. The next argument I want to start relates to the bypass mechanism. If I put in a bypass humidifere with a 6-inch bypass and I have a two-ton furnace with a 20x14 filter, I am wasting about 10% of my air flow (check my math) thru the humidifier, instead of going thru the heater coil.
Anyway I cant wait to see my heat bills. The humidifere with hot water tap fogs my windows! But do I even need humidification if I have a tight house? I shut down the humidistat for a week and the humidity dropped fairly slowly. Well I have bought the humidifier so i guess I am stuck with it! Cheers!
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On Dec 20, 5:29pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

My unit is after the furnace, You are too humid if windows fog, then it drips, then mold, then wood rot, then skin disease, then your hair falls out. Yours is not the auto adjust unit I see.
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ransley wrote:

yes, this. I have hygrometers at various places around the house (cheap ones intended for use in humidors, but I did calibrate them) and with the humidistat controlling my humidifier set to keep humidity roughly in the 45-55% RH range, I have no condensation on any of my windows, and they're 1980's Andersen units (that is, not the most leak-proof... way better than the old single pane units the house likely came with, but certainly not as good as new ones could be) I consider that $20 or so well spent, now I'm certain that I'm not damaging anything or spending too much money on gas heating excess water in the air.
nate
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Right you are not damaging stuff, OP is condensing on glass you are not, but at -10 -15f your humidity of 50% will condense, I also have andersons and calibrated humidistats
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Furnaces aren't measured in tons! They are measured in BTU per hour! You have your humidistat set too high! Turn it down! As air leaks through your house, the humidity will come down! You're not stuck with it! You can take it out! Abuse of exclaimation points can be treated! Find a self help group! You need to get through the denial, and realize your're an exclaimation point junkie! It's a stimulant like caffeine or nicotine! Your life is worth it! Get help!
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Christopher A. Young
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On Dec 20, 7:08pm, "Stormin Mormon"

I don;t know about the specifics of the calculation, but you are right about the principle. Bypass models short circuit some of the air flow. Also, the path through the duct presents additional heat loss, which in an unfinished basement or attic, is a waste. And then if you or some homeowner who isn't on the ball doesn't close the path off in the summer, you are also short circuiting cooling air in the summer. Finally, a fan powered unit can be easier to install.
For all those reasons, I chose the Aprilaire 760 which uses a small fan instead of the bypass duct. There are others who favor the bypass model. One reason I've heard is that with the unit sitting on the hot side of the funace, if any water should leak, it's more likely to make it's way to furnace electronics. Not sure if that really happens or applies to all models of furnace, etc.

You should not have fogging of windows, whether you use hot water or cold. That is too much humidity. If it's condensing there, it is also condensing in other places, like around recessed lights that are in ceilings that have unheated attic above, etc. That can lead to long term damage, or even immediate damage from water staining paint, etc. The humidistat needs to be adjusted to get below the point of window condensation and keep it below 50% max. It's much better to err on the side of too little. If you get to just the point where you no longer have static shocks, that's a good indication of a safe level. You can probably go higher, but be carefull.
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On Sun 23 Nov 2008 05:43:51p, Dan told us...

I dont know if theyre all installed the way ours was, but the AprilAire we had would not actually activate unless there was heated air passing through the duct. From what I understand this is to prevent rust. Heated air will vaporize the mist whereas cold air will not, and wet moisture is carried into the air.
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Illustrating nicely that there are different designs of humidifier. Yours was aparently a mist sprayer. The ones I used to install are bypass model with media pad and drain.
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On Nov 23, 8:38pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Aparently? my April Air is media, which April Air are mist.
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On Mon 24 Nov 2008 09:27:49a, ransley told us...

model
AprilAire
Sorry, but its been years since weve lived in that house. I dont remember the model.
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Wayne Boatwright
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Dan wrote:

Hi, Hot air should flow through the water panel to help generate moisture. Blowing through cold air is the problem. How about supplying hot water to humidifier.
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