AprilAire Humidifier?

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Hi,
My dad had one installed in his condo. The problem is his condo unit hardly needs heat because the condo unit is on the second floor (of 3 floors) and is between 2 other condos on adjacent sides. His AprilAire unit does not have a separate power-fan so I told him to leave the HVAC fan in the "on" position even if the heat unit is not on. But still he can't get the RH above 33. Is the AprilAire unit installed wrong?
TIA, Danno
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Be sure the humidistat is calling for more moisture. Also, unless the air is heated, it is difficult to add moisture. Therefore, running the fan alone is not likely to add much humidity even though the Aprilaire is running. The only other method you could employ to add more humidity would be to connect the Aprilaire water supply line to the hot (rather than the cold) supply line, since hot water will evaporate more quickly into the cooler air coming from your HVAC fan. Your operating costs will rise since you are then using heated water to humidify.
Smarty
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wrote:

On the contrary, that is almost quite the wives-tale. How quickly do you think that "hot" water is going to cool off after traveling through a 1/4" copper pipe at a slow rate, then trickeling down slowly over a honeycomb pad while aproximately 1200cfm of cool/room temperature air is wizzing by it?? You will do nothing but dump water down the drain. Bubba
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Well perhaps it is a wives' tale. But since my Aprilaire was switched from a cold water supply line to a hot water supply line, the relative humidity in the house has risen substantially. This was the method recommended to me by Aprilaire Customer Service in Wisconsin when I contacted them and asked for their help in solving a similar problem to the one stated in the original post. It works well for me and I suspect it will for him also.
Smarty
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More wrong information, April Air doesnt agree with you on using hot water.
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ransley says...

Really? Check out the bottom of page 10 of the owners manual http://www.aprilaire.com/themes/aa/en/manuals/600a.pdf
"Hot supply water, 140F maximum, is recommended with drain type humidifiers for increasing capacity and is required for heat pump and air handler applications."
I ran hot water to mine.
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I was saying hot is recommended, Bubba was saying it wont help, you know Bubba the heat pro.
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On Mon, 24 Nov 2008 08:33:49 -0800 (PST), ransley

ransley.......do you ever get anything right? Of course that is what Aprilaire said. They sell humidifiers. Do you believe EVERYTHING you read or hear? Just because someone printed it doesnt mean its right. Try this (although it would require you having an instrument that you dont possess). While having a good quality infrared temperature gun, "shoot" the temperature of the water line and the pad in several different spots with and without the air running. Now switch the water line over to the hot side and take the same temperature reading points again. Ive done it, thus the reason I posted what I did. Do it yourself. Now shut the hell up and learn something. Try and "Step OUT of the box." Bubba
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I made the change at Aprilaire's recommendation and the switch made a huge difference. It could be seen in my humidity measurements, and, more important, could be easily seen and felt in the house. The gain in humidity was experienced in less than a day. I can't imagine that Aprilaire would have recommended it "because they sell humidifiers". If they sold hot water heaters, I could possibly find some slight logic to your argument....
Smarty
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wrote:

You just hang onto that little pipe dream there, Smarty. Perhaps tomorrow you can click your red ruby slippers together 3 times and say, "There's no place like home, There's no place like home, There's no place like home". Next thing you know, you will be back in Kansas. Bubba
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Bubba,
This is directly from the Aprilaire web literature. I can send you other links if you want to see them. Please save your red slipper nonsense for a discussion with children.
8. Should our humidifier be connected with hot or cold water? All of our flow-through units can be connected to hot or cold water. Hot water increases the evaporative capacity of your humidifier, provides more humidity to the and offers more flexibility in the operation of the humidifier. We would recommend that they be connected to hot water. With any drain-through Aprilaire humidifier connected to hot water, the heat in the water is used in the evaporation process and the water coming out of the drain will be cold to the touch.
Smarty
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Bubba,
Here is another citation. Note that this is NOT from a manufacturer of humidifiers, and thus (using your strange logic) is not trying to sell you a humidifier:
Why is my humidifier hooked up to hot water? Most humidifiers are hooked up to a cold water source but in certain situations where more humidity is required or the water supply is very mineral rich, the manufacturer recommends hooking up to warm/hot water. This will automatically increase the humidification capacity of the unit and help to prevent annoying mineral buildup in the unit which is the leading cause of malfunction. The two positions are usually used in conjunction with a central air cleaning system.
Smarty
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wrote:

I would guess because you believed some crap you saw and hooked it up that way. If someone told you that if you took a dive head first into an empty pool because it would make you healthy and rich would you do it?

And Im telling you that hooking it up to the hot water line will give you little to no added humidity unless you do something ridiculous like turning the water heater way up and removing the restrictor orifice so it literally pours water through that pad like a flood. A central air cleaning system has nothing to do with humidity or how a humidifier works. You really dont pay attention, do you? Try my temp test if you dont believe it. Bubba

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Maybe you should start designing humidifies if you know more about them than AprilAir does.
I might add that for my installation, the water feeding the humidifier is hot most of the time when it is on.
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On Nov 25, 7:22am, snipped-for-privacy@columbus.rr.com wrote:

I have mine hooked to the hot water supply as well. Bubba obviously doesn't understand very simple science. How water will always evaporate at a higher rate than cold water. That's why clothes dryers heat the clothes instead of just tumbling them around.
The real test of course would be to measure how much water comes out the drain with the exact same input flow of hot and cold. I bet Aprilaire has done that. Bubba hasn't.
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On Tue, 25 Nov 2008 04:51:51 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

You, Smarty, Jim and ransley have about the same mental brain capacity as a knat. Hot water WILL evaporate better than cold in certain circumstances. Drying clothes with a 30amp electrical circuit doesn't even come close to the amount of heat in the water for a humidifier. The water line is 1/4" OD diameter. Pressure is usually around 65psi and it is then squeezed through a tiny little plastic orifice before it starts to drip down over the pad. The orifice alone causes a lot of the water temperature drop. Then, as soon as the air from the furnace blower hits it at about 800 to 1200 or more CFM, the temperature disappears in an instant. As I stated in a previous post to ransley the idiot, I've already tested it. That's why I know. It does absolutely next to nothing to evaporate any more water. Now if you could get it to flood your pad with about a gallon a minute of !40 degree or higher water temperature, then you might have something. You guys are just mouthy idiots and don't bother testing what you read. So ducking gullible. Test something on your own for once. Bubba
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Bubba,
The outcome of my "test" was entirely what Aprilaire and all other well-informed sources predicted: a significant increase in humidity once I switched my Aprilaire over to a hot water supply. I don't know how your method of infrared temperature measurements was developed, but it obviously has led you to some very false conclusions.
I'm sure it is no coincidence that vaporizers and other medical humdifiers work by heating water also.
Your theory that Aprilaire encourages this practice of using hot water so as to sell more humdifiers is also about the least logical idea I have heard in years.....
Smarty
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Compressible water? :-)

A small water flow over a large area might quickly reach the air temp, regardless of the initial water temp.
Nick
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On Tue, 25 Nov 2008 04:22:40 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@columbus.rr.com wrote:

and hit the pad with an infrared thermometer in several spots. Now switch it to the cold water line in the same scenario and look at your temperatures. Feel the "hot" water as it comes out of the drain. "Gee mom, it aint hot no mo." Bubba
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On Tue, 25 Nov 2008 11:49:58 -0500, Bubba wrote:

One of the ways water releases its heat is to evaporate (the goal here no?). The fact that the water that didn't evaporate has cooled down by the time it comes out the drain is not relevant.
Why would you think that simply passing through an orifice will cool the water? It will to the extent that some of the heat is transferred to the orifice body, but that will be negligible after the first ounce or so.
--
Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
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