Aprilaire 600 humidity output

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:>>

Hi, ECM or X13 type motor draws power from main AC, Humidifier connection should be there. ECM is servorized DC motor ans X13 is also DC motor with speed taps. Rectifiers produce DC for them for main 120V AC input. Look at the control board schematics and trace the AC input to blower circuit. No relay or hard thinking needed.
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On Wednesday, November 26, 2014 11:27:34 AM UTC-5, Tony Hwang wrote:

. If you connect the humdifier directly to the blower motor, the humidifer will be fed with different voltages when the blower operates at different s peeds.

idifer. A not so bad way to deal with it is to connect the humidifier to t he HIGH speed tap. Then the humidifier will see full line voltage when the blower is on high and it will see LOWER line voltage when the blower is on low. This is not too bad usually. The worst thing you can do is connect the humidifer to a low speed tap. Then the voltage to the humdifier may g et above 120 when the blower is on high speed, which can be very bad for th e humidifer.

and use a meter to check the voltage at the humidifer over all modes of ope ration.

Hi Tony, my furnace was a Trane XV95, I can probably look through the manua l for the control board schematics? is that right?
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Hongyi Kang wrote:

Hi, Of course. If and when some times you need extra humidity in the house now you have to run the heating mode to activate the humidifier which is not ideal. I always hooked up the humidifier to run when blower runs. When I installed Aprilaire kit, it contained humidistat, small 24V AC transformer, outdoor temperature sensor to automate the humidity level. I did not use this sensor. Before this unit I used Lennox spray nozzle type. Next time I want to try steam generating type. It is getting cold again here with snow coming down.
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There are two separate problems here.
The humidifier may or may not be keeping the house at the designed humidity .
Some humans in the house have symptoms or discomfort that may or may not be related to low humidity.
If there is condensation on the windows, normally that means the humidity i s too high. If that condensation is liquid (a slight haze up to actual dri ps) then there is no question. That level of humidity is dangerously high. It can lead to mold growth which can lead to respiratory systems in sensi tive people.
If that condensation is beautiful frost crystals, there is some chance humi dity is not too high, but the window is too cold. That's bad too because y ou're wasting energy, but the humidity might not be too high. There is sti ll almost no chance the humidity is too low, IMO.
How tight the house is makes a difference, too. By tight, I mean how much outside air sneaks in. That outside air is cold, so it can't hold a lot of moisture. When it warms up, it can hold more, so the air is relatively dr y. Houses in the US are usually not very tight. When we lived in Germany our house was very tight and had to be ventilated by opening windows daily even in winter.
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On Friday, November 28, 2014 8:47:21 AM UTC-5, TimR wrote:

Maybe even more issues, but I'm not sure there is any real problem.

ty.

HK finally reported that the actual humidity he's measuring in the house is 45 - 50%. So, apparently the humidifier is working.

be related to low humidity.

is too high. If that condensation is liquid (a slight haze up to actual d rips) then there is no question. That level of humidity is dangerously hig h. It can lead to mold growth which can lead to respiratory systems in sen sitive people.

I mostly agree. I think some small amount of condensation at few windows may still be OK. But if there is condensation, water on a lot of windows, then the humidity is too high. I think 45% is the max you typically want when it's ~35 outside, less as the temperature goes down. Which is why the better models come with the outdoor temp sensor, to automatically compensate, but apparently some people don't want that.

midity is not too high, but the window is too cold. That's bad too because you're wasting energy, but the humidity might not be too high. There is s till almost no chance the humidity is too low, IMO.
I think HK's biggest problem was that instead of measuring the humidity by placing the hygrometer at some typical locations inside the house, he was placing it at the heat register, giving a false reading.

h outside air sneaks in. That outside air is cold, so it can't hold a lot of moisture. When it warms up, it can hold more, so the air is relatively dry. Houses in the US are usually not very tight. When we lived in German y our house was very tight and had to be ventilated by opening windows dail y even in winter.
Agree.
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I currently see condensation mainly just on the bathroom and kitchen window s. And Trader, when I mentioned 45% to 50%, I also said it was because the weather became warmer, not because the hunidifier was behaving differently . Now the outdoor temperature has decreased again, the humidity dropped ag ain to between 35% and 40%.
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On Wednesday, November 26, 2014 11:27:34 AM UTC-5, Tony Hwang wrote:

. If you connect the humdifier directly to the blower motor, the humidifer will be fed with different voltages when the blower operates at different s peeds.

idifer. A not so bad way to deal with it is to connect the humidifier to t he HIGH speed tap. Then the humidifier will see full line voltage when the blower is on high and it will see LOWER line voltage when the blower is on low. This is not too bad usually. The worst thing you can do is connect the humidifer to a low speed tap. Then the voltage to the humdifier may g et above 120 when the blower is on high speed, which can be very bad for th e humidifer.

and use a meter to check the voltage at the humidifer over all modes of ope ration.

I don't know about your furnace or blower. But mine and I think most moder n ones of the type we're talking about, the AC comes into the main furnace control board on a pair of wires that gets connected to the house 120V AC. The ECM blower motor is driven by a wiring harness connected between the bl ower motor and that main control board. Between the incoming AC and the ECM blower is the guts of the control board including CPU and power control electonics to drive the ECM motor. IDK how exactly one figures out what is going on in there and simply taps into a PC board. And even if you do, what's there surely isn't just 120V, because the controller can make the motor spin at whatever continously variable speed it wants and can somehow even sense the load on the motor to gauge the airflow.
If it's done the way you say, I'd like to see an example of an install manual for a humidifier that says so.
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wrote:

You also might (eventually?) want a humidistat to control this wire too**. I didn't read all of the thead, but I'm guessing you want higher than you have now, but lower than 100% RH. If you put the blower on ON, so it runs 24 hours a day, you might well get more humidity than even you want.
**You could probably wire it to inlude the current humidistat, but I never read whether that was part of the problem or not. AFAIK yoiu might need a second one set higher.
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On Monday, November 24, 2014 11:54:26 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

I think Tony mentioned earlier that the humidifiers should come with a transformer which allows the blower power be hooked up with it, maybe I could ask the contractor and see if they have that?
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Several installation manuals are listed here: http://www.platformusers.net/rt/trane-xv95-installation-manual/
They require signing up at the site to read. I didn't do that. The "Full Download" is the biggest file.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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