Aprilaire 600 humidity output

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On 11/24/2014 12:05 AM, Hongyi Kang wrote:

It is nice to have comfort. Sadly, sounds like your humidifier is not doing the job. I wonder if the furnace is over sized, and not allowing for enough run time?
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On Sun, 23 Nov 2014 12:15:26 -0800 (PST), Hongyi Kang

If you want to fully appreciate Usenet, and its 10,000 newsgroups, you can get a newsreader and news server.. You probably already have a news reader, and others are free. And news servers run from $4/month, or more, down to free.
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On Fri, 21 Nov 2014 15:53:27 -0800 (PST), Hongyi Kang

Just FYI ... the control device is a humidistat. The sensor (or gauge) is a hygrometer.
You'd be surprised how much difference temperature makes in how much water air can hold. I found a calculator at
http://andrew.rsmas.miami.edu/bmcnoldy/Humidity.html
and plugged in some of the numbers you'd quoted. It doesn't convert directly from RH at one temperature to RH at another temperature, so you have to take it in two steps.
If the temperature is 72F and the relative humidity is 45%, then the dewpoint is about 50F.
If the dewpoint is 50F and the relative humidity is 16%, then the temperature is 105F.
And 105F coming out of a register from a gas furnace is reasonable.
So yes, it's quite reasonable that the RH could be 16% at the register and 45% in the middle of the room. Or IOW, 16% RH at 105F and 45% RH at 72F are the same *absolute* humidity.
Edward
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Edward Reid wrote:

Every house I had custom built and lived in always had humidistat mounted side by side with thermostat. In present house I upgraded to wireless thermostat which I can move around in the house and humidity is monitored by humidistat still at location next to thermostat used to be on a wall.
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On Monday, November 24, 2014 6:35:53 PM UTC-5, Edward Reid wrote:

Thanks Edward, one of the websites Nate posted earlier: http://home.fuse.net/clymer/water/rh.html
actually had the conversion between different temperature's RH. And I just finished the salt calibration of my hygrometer, it's actually measuring 70 % instead of 75%, so I guess it is 5% off. The temperature of the air comi ng out of the hot register was between 95 and 102. Based on these, I think my humidifier is probably working fine, just not enough yet for my wife's problem. I'll ask the service tech and see if they could rewire the unit s o that it can run while the blower is on. Thanks!
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On Monday, November 24, 2014 10:28:36 PM UTC-5, Hongyi Kang wrote:

70% instead of 75%, so I guess it is 5% off. The temperature of the air co ming out of the hot register was between 95 and 102. Based on these, I thi nk my humidifier is probably working fine, just not enough yet for my wife' s problem. I'll ask the service tech and see if they could rewire the unit so that it can run while the blower is on. Thanks!
If the humidity is already at 70 to 75% and you're intending to drive it higher, you're almost certainly headed for trouble in NY. No building science folks I've ever seen recommend humidity anywhere near that high. About 50% is tops for a house in winter. And if it gets down to 10F or 20F then more like 30% is tops. At 70%+ expect lots of condensation and likely damage. The most I would do is keep maybe a bedroom higher, with a separat e humidifier.
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On Tuesday, November 25, 2014 7:56:01 AM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

g 70% instead of 75%, so I guess it is 5% off. The temperature of the air coming out of the hot register was between 95 and 102. Based on these, I t hink my humidifier is probably working fine, just not enough yet for my wif e's problem. I'll ask the service tech and see if they could rewire the un it so that it can run while the blower is on. Thanks!

Oh the 70% came from the salt and water calibration you mentioned before. I put the hygrometer with water saturated salt in a zip bag and it read 70% instead of 75%, my room never was that high lol.
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If you are getting condensation on your windows, you have enough humidity. Whether or not it is comfortable is a separate matter. If the humidistat is set for maximum, that is all you can do if everything else has been chec ked out.
You might call the manufacturer and see if they would send out someone for free to look at your problem as a goodwill gesture. If you tell about an un satsfactory service call and your wife and new baby, they might be more wil ing to send someone out without a charge to preserve their reputation. It might not hurt to mention this series of posts on this forum and how it is hurting their reputation to not have solved the problem. A little pressure on them<g>.
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On Monday, November 24, 2014 10:54:22 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote :

t is set for maximum, that is all you can do if everything else has been ch ecked out.

unsatsfactory service call and your wife and new baby, they might be more w iling to send someone out without a charge to preserve their reputation. I t might not hurt to mention this series of posts on this forum and how it i s hurting their reputation to not have solved the problem. A little pressu re on them<g>.
Thanks for the advice! Will certainly do.
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On Mon, 24 Nov 2014 19:28:33 -0800 (PST), Hongyi Kang

That' a very good idea. I had a room AC when I lived in a very small room and the AC was right next to my bed, and the fan ran all night even if the air had cooled off and the compressor wasn't running. I hated the noise.
I took off the cover, and just had to rearrange three slip-on connectors. I didnt' have to cut or solder anything, and when the compressor went off, the fan did too. Furnaces and humidifiers are more spread out so it probably won't be that easy, but it can certainly be done.
Actually you only need one wire with two ends.
There is probably a neutral wire from the humidifier to a common neutral somewhere . You can leave that alone. All you need is a hot wire that runs from the hot wire where the blower gets its power and goes straight to the humidifier, where the hot wire from the furnace control unit already connects to the humidifier. So the power doesn't have to go through the furnace control unit.
You ought to put a switch on the wire, for when your wife is fully recovered, or for when you trade houses with someone from New Zealand.
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On Monday, November 24, 2014 11:46:43 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

Are you aware that he said he had a variable speed blower, which today is likely ECM?

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On Tuesday, November 25, 2014 7:58:57 AM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

and even with an old fashion multi speed blower there are complications. If you connect the humdifier directly to the blower motor, the humidifer will be fed with different voltages when the blower operates at different speed s.
The best way to deal with this is to add another relay to power the humidif er. A not so bad way to deal with it is to connect the humidifier to the H IGH speed tap. Then the humidifier will see full line voltage when the blo wer is on high and it will see LOWER line voltage when the blower is on low . This is not too bad usually. The worst thing you can do is connect the humidifer to a low speed tap. Then the voltage to the humdifier may get a bove 120 when the blower is on high speed, which can be very bad for the hu midifer.
Bottom line, use a relay or be sure to connect to a the high speed tap and use a meter to check the voltage at the humidifer over all modes of operati on. Nothing is ever easy. :-)
Mark
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On Tuesday, November 25, 2014 9:25:35 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

They have current sensing relays that can be added. But he may not even need one. It's a modern furnace and they typically have outputs on the control board for a humidifier, air cleaner, etc. First thing is to find out what the furnace has and under what conditions it's activated.
Plus it looks like a moot point to me. After measuring the humidity in the house, instead of at the hot air register, I believe the OP reported he was getting 70 - 75% with the way it's wired now. He said something about making it higher, but that's another story, and IMO, a bad idea.

Leaving what's working alone is..... :)
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On Wednesday, November 26, 2014 8:50:18 AM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

Hi Trader, the 70% was actually measured in a zip bag with water saturated salt to calibrate the hygrometer. My room was never that high. These a few days it had been warmer, the humidity had been aroun 45%-50%.
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On Wednesday, November 26, 2014 11:21:18 AM UTC-5, Hongyi Kang wrote:

r will be fed with different voltages when the blower operates at different speeds.

peration.

That should be fine then, that's typically your target humidity. Too much lower and you can feel the effects of the dryness; too much higher and you' re risking mold growth etc. and also possible damage from condensation. If it's really cold outside you may get condensation on your windows even at 40-45% RH inside, so you may have to drop back a little in really cold weat her.
nate
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On Monday, December 1, 2014 11:02:50 AM UTC-5, N8N wrote:

fer will be fed with different voltages when the blower operates at differe nt speeds.

operation.

u're risking mold growth etc. and also possible damage from condensation. If it's really cold outside you may get condensation on your windows even a t 40-45% RH inside, so you may have to drop back a little in really cold we ather.

Which is why the models with an outdoor temp sensor that automatically redu ces the target humidity level as the temp drops are a good idea. You don't hav e to remember and fiddle with the setting when temps swing around in winter.
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On Tuesday, November 25, 2014 9:25:35 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

ll be fed with different voltages when the blower operates at different spe eds.

HIGH speed tap. Then the humidifier will see full line voltage when the b lower is on high and it will see LOWER line voltage when the blower is on l ow. This is not too bad usually. The worst thing you can do is connect t he humidifer to a low speed tap. Then the voltage to the humdifier may get above 120 when the blower is on high speed, which can be very bad for the humidifer.

tion.

Tony mentioned that those humidifiers should usually come with a little tra nsformer which transforms 120V to 24V I suppose, and can be used to connect the blower power to the humidifier. I might be able to ask the contractor that?
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On Wednesday, November 26, 2014 11:19:15 AM UTC-5, Hongyi Kang wrote:

will be fed with different voltages when the blower operates at different s peeds.

he HIGH speed tap. Then the humidifier will see full line voltage when the blower is on high and it will see LOWER line voltage when the blower is on low. This is not too bad usually. The worst thing you can do is connect the humidifer to a low speed tap. Then the voltage to the humdifier may g et above 120 when the blower is on high speed, which can be very bad for th e humidifer.

ration.

ct the blower power to the humidifier. I might be able to ask the contract or that?
See the post from mako about blower motors. It's not as simple as just connecting the humidifier directly to the blower motor, certainly not with a modern variable speed blower. An older style multi-speed blower has multiple windings that selectively get powered to get the various speeds. New ones are typical ECM, with a complex controller on the furnace board that drives the motor, not a wire with 120V on it.
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On Wednesday, November 26, 2014 11:28:50 AM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

r will be fed with different voltages when the blower operates at different speeds.

the HIGH speed tap. Then the humidifier will see full line voltage when t he blower is on high and it will see LOWER line voltage when the blower is on low. This is not too bad usually. The worst thing you can do is conne ct the humidifer to a low speed tap. Then the voltage to the humdifier may get above 120 when the blower is on high speed, which can be very bad for the humidifer.

peration.

nect the blower power to the humidifier. I might be able to ask the contra ctor that?

Hi Trader, the furnace I had installed was a Trane xv95. I will look through the manual to see if it's possible. I'm also waiting for the contractor company to call me back and let me know if it is doable.
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On Wednesday, November 26, 2014 11:19:15 AM UTC-5, Hongyi Kang wrote:

will be fed with different voltages when the blower operates at different s peeds.

he HIGH speed tap. Then the humidifier will see full line voltage when the blower is on high and it will see LOWER line voltage when the blower is on low. This is not too bad usually. The worst thing you can do is connect the humidifer to a low speed tap. Then the voltage to the humdifier may g et above 120 when the blower is on high speed, which can be very bad for th e humidifer.

ration.

ct the blower power to the humidifier. I might be able to ask the contract or that?
Some humidifiers are powered by 120VAC and some are powered by 24VAC. Some furnace control boards have a "humidifier" terminal that outputs 120VAC an d some output 24VAC. Some do not have a "humidifier" terminal at all.
In any case, a relay or two should fix you up if you have a mismatch betwee n your boards and your humidifier. But I would assume if this was professi onally installed, that everything is reasonably copacetic. (NB: not always ... e.g. I had to rework the humidifier installation at my old place where the humidifier was installed before the AC unit, so it was wired into the " EAC" not the "HUM" terminal. So the humidifier could run when the AC was o n, or the fan was manually turned on by the new thermostat. Old heat only stat was a honeywell round mercury thing with no separate fan terminal so e ither would have worked in the original configuration. Easy fix though.)
Have you had a chance to let your hygrometer sit in the middle of a room lo ng enough for it to stabilize? What was the reading?
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