Aprilaire 600 humidity output

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On Monday, November 24, 2014 11:44:20 AM UTC-5, N8N wrote:

rote:

y ever

ain! Unfortunately I'm Chinese but I always wished I could understand Kore an :D

air flow from supply to the humidifier(the one that I could control with th e horizontal/vertical switch), then yes I did double check and make sure it was fully on. I've also tried different water flow from the hot water sup ply, from minimum to maximum, humidity output did not change. The humidity monitor I was using was AcuRite 00613A1 Indoor Humidity Monitor. Bought f rom Amazon, not sure if it's okay to post links here so I'll just skip that for now. Anyways for the two years since I had it its performance had bee n satisfactory for me, it was able to sense humidity changes and never fluc tuated when in a stable environment.

have was 16%, therefore the hot air I was measuring probably was even lower than 16%, this is the main thing I was concerned about, and also why I thi nk I might be >experiencing something different from other people who has t he same unit.

in mind

ir cools

so said

ow as

t will

de temp

ove 40%.

not

igh as

is on,

out of it.

urnace

l help.

ing much higher than 16% sounds reasonable, but I'm not sure if this hot/co ld air difference will be able to account for the difference between the 45 % and 16%. The humidifier should not sense the outside temperature because when I had it installed I specifically asked for them to not put in the au tomatic one, but the manual one instead. So the humidistat on the return d uct is just a round knob pointing to different numbers, no digital display.

of register is reasonable or not, if it is, I probably shouldn't even both er getting the service guy back in again. But if it's not, I'm thinking wh ether there are other hardware configuration problems involved that they co uld make improvements on.

r. That is why in the winter the inside of your house is so dry to begin w ith - it may be 80% RH outside at 20 degrees but (let me google for a real number) that same mass of air heated to 65 degrees will be around 15% RH wi thout having any change in water content.

but in fact as far away from them as possible, as the air coming out of the supply duct will be warmer than the ambient temperature of the house.

r than your target of 40-45% due to the temperature difference.

This is definitely very useful information! I never knew this hot/cold RH difference before. I'll keep my humidistat by the return register then. Th anks Nate!
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On Monday, 24 November 2014 16:44:20 UTC, N8N wrote:

rote:

y ever

ain! Unfortunately I'm Chinese but I always wished I could understand Kore an :D

air flow from supply to the humidifier(the one that I could control with th e horizontal/vertical switch), then yes I did double check and make sure it was fully on. I've also tried different water flow from the hot water sup ply, from minimum to maximum, humidity output did not change. The humidity monitor I was using was AcuRite 00613A1 Indoor Humidity Monitor. Bought f rom Amazon, not sure if it's okay to post links here so I'll just skip that for now. Anyways for the two years since I had it its performance had bee n satisfactory for me, it was able to sense humidity changes and never fluc tuated when in a stable environment.

have was 16%, therefore the hot air I was measuring probably was even lower than 16%, this is the main thing I was concerned about, and also why I thi nk I might be >experiencing something different from other people who has t he same unit.

in mind

ir cools

so said

ow as

t will

de temp

ove 40%.

not

igh as

is on,

out of it.

urnace

l help.

ing much higher than 16% sounds reasonable, but I'm not sure if this hot/co ld air difference will be able to account for the difference between the 45 % and 16%. The humidifier should not sense the outside temperature because when I had it installed I specifically asked for them to not put in the au tomatic one, but the manual one instead. So the humidistat on the return d uct is just a round knob pointing to different numbers, no digital display.

of register is reasonable or not, if it is, I probably shouldn't even both er getting the service guy back in again. But if it's not, I'm thinking wh ether there are other hardware configuration problems involved that they co uld make improvements on.

r. That is why in the winter the inside of your house is so dry to begin w ith - it may be 80% RH outside at 20 degrees but (let me google for a real number) that same mass of air heated to 65 degrees will be around 15% RH wi thout having any change in water content.

but in fact as far away from them as possible, as the air coming out of the supply duct will be warmer than the ambient temperature of the house.

r than your target of 40-45% due to the temperature difference.

Hi Nate!
You posted this website "http://home.fuse.net/clymer/water/rh.html " in the past, and i am trying to log onto this. I cannot access this website. Is it possible to speak with you regarding theoretical RH at given temperatures?
I need some help.
thanks
Sim
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On Saturday, November 22, 2014 8:31:33 AM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

ng,

.

Thanks Trader for the response! As far as I can see, the water is flowing w hen the heat is on and is not flowing when heat is off. The house is only 1 600 sq ft so I thought the humidifier should be plenty. The unit is locate d on the return duct and the air supply comes from the hot air supply duct. The unit is running on hot water line and I tried various water flow on i t, there was always water draining down the draining tube and the humidity output did not change. I'm getting another one of these humidistat in a co uple of days, I'll test and see if they give the same readings. I guess my question right now is whether the humidifier ever fails to output what it should be outputting, or it's already working fine but I'm asking too much from it? I'm really curious if there are other people with the same kinda humidifier and similar outdoor temperature, what humidity they are getting from the hot air registers. The way this thing works is almost purely phys ics so I really can't imagine where could've gone wrong.
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On 11/22/2014 2:28 PM, Hongyi Kang wrote:

see, the water is flowing when the heat is on and is not flowing when heat is off. The house is only 1600 sq ft so I thought the humidifier should be plenty. The unit is located on the return duct and the air supply comes from the hot air supply duct. The unit is running on hot water line and I tried various water flow on it, there was always water draining down the draining tube and the humidity output did not change. I'm getting another one of these humidistat in a couple of days, I'll test and see if they give the same readings. I guess my question right now is whether the humidifier ever fails to output what it should be outputting, or it's already working fine but I'm asking too much from it? I'm really curious if there are other people with the same kinda humidifier and similar outdoor temperature, what humidity they are getting from the hot air registers. The way this thing works is almost purely physics so I really can't imagine where could've gone wrong.

I had an idea, which might sounds strange. In order for the water to evaporate, it has to soak into the white fibers of the media pad. if there is a lot of mineral build up, the water might be sliding down the outside of the pad, instead of soaking into the fibers.
Someone else suggested to soak the pad in vinegar, or use some CLR to see if there is calcium carbonate build up. I'd also wonder if a tiny bit of soap would help water to soak in. Spray a little bit of some thing like Simple Green detergent on the white fiber pad.
Just thinking, here.
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.
Christopher A. Young
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On Saturday, November 22, 2014 8:31:33 AM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

ng,

.

yes on several things. Get some cheap humidor hygrometers and calibrate th em using the salt method (google it) to verify RH in the house.
Then if everything checks out OK but the humidifier just can't keep up (a s ign would be that it is constantly running every single time that the furna ce is calling for heat) consider changing the water feed from cold to hot t o increase the efficiency of the humidifier.
nate
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On Monday, November 24, 2014 11:35:53 AM UTC-5, N8N wrote:

wing,

ch

ut.

them using the salt method (google it) to verify RH in the house.

sign would be that it is constantly running every single time that the fur nace is calling for heat) consider changing the water feed from cold to hot to increase the efficiency of the humidifier.

I believe he said it's already using hot water.
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On 11/21/2014 8:13 PM, Hongyi Kang wrote:

I learned about the damper from the thread. Didn't know I had one and don't shut it off. Have to do that next summer.
I don't measure humidity but Aprilaire seems to work OK but things do dry out in the winter. I put in a new pad every year as old has a lot of salts precipitated around it although I think it could work for a couple of years without change.
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On 11/22/2014 4:12 PM, Frank wrote:

Leaving the damper open with central AC makes it much more likely to freeze the evaporator coil.
I'm wondering if the OP need to replace that pad, might be the water is on the outside of the pad, not soaking into the fibers.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Saturday, November 22, 2014 4:15:03 PM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Thanks Stormin for the thinking, I actually bought a new pad on Friday and put it in already, I had the side with the black mark facing up. Although i t seemed to me that the side facing into the return duct also matters, I ha d the pad oriented so that the little holes in it go upwards, not sure if i t's correct though.
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On 11/22/2014 4:14 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Pad appears to be a paper coated aluminum honeycomb. They mention paper on the box but you can see aluminum showing through. It is not like the sponge like pad I had on an old Sears unit which every now and then I'd take off and soak in dilute vinegar to remove salts. When I replace the pad each year I note a lot of dried salts which I vacuum out but pad is not full of them. Pads are maybe $5-7 which is not a big expense.
In the summer, we shut off water to the pad and not sure what difference it will make but will close mine next summer.
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On 11/21/2014 05:53 PM, Hongyi Kang wrote:

I have a similar setup in my own house and when the unit is working properly, there should be some drainage from the over-flow hose at the bottom.
If there is nothing coming out, then not enough water is going in.
Check to be sure the water stop-cock is open far enough and also clean out calcium deposits at the water orifice inside the humidifier if it looks like only a small amount of water is flowing through the feeder holes.
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Yes, how large is the house? How well sealed is it? You may need two. When I had Aprilaires I had two of them.
You can also improve it a little bit by having the fan run continuously.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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You are in the right place. But your posting with no carriage returns makes it very hard to read your posts. One has to scroll back and forth.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On Saturday, November 22, 2014 4:42:22 PM UTC-5, Don Wiss wrote:

e wrong place. I recently (3 months ago) installed a new Trane 2 stage ECM furnace and along with it an Aprilaire 600 whole house Humidifier. It's u pstate New York here, I've been setting the the thermostat to 73 degree, so furnace officially started working since late September.

es

I will have to learn how to post with carriage return then. Sorry about th e inconvenience. :D
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On 11/22/2014 4:56 PM, Hongyi Kang wrote:

let me know if I'm posting things at the wrong place. I recently (3 months ago) installed a new Trane 2 stage ECM furnace and along with it an Aprilaire 600 whole house Humidifier. It's upstate New York here, I've been setting the the thermostat to 73 degree, so furnace officially started working since late September.

carriage return then. Sorry about the inconvenience. :D

Don, the modern generation has no idea what is a carriage, and less idea what is a carriage return. That may take some explaining to computer users.
I some times have to reply, and then insert the carriage returns as I've done with the quoted text.
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That is my test. Touch a metal light switch plate. If no static shocks there, or any other place, the humidly is high enough.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On Saturday, November 22, 2014 4:44:29 PM UTC-5, Don Wiss wrote:

I'll give that a shot, thanks!
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In the OP's header I find: User-Agent: G2/1.0 Which I find here: http://www.g2reader.com/en/
I would think it has a setting someplace. But it appears to be a simple app and not a regular application for a desktop computer. So maybe no settings.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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wrote:

But doesn't that depend on what kind of carpet he has, if any, and what kind of soles there are on the shoes they wear? They both have to be right to get static.
In 30 years, I've never gotten a static shock in this house**, and for at least 10 of these years, I've had no humidifier and I'm sure the humidity was low. In fact an ivory came loose on my piano for the first time in over 67 years. .
**Because the carpet is synthetic (I'm sure). I'm also not sure if the rubber-like stuff on the bottom of my slippers and sneakers are the same kind of rubber that would create a static charge if I had wool carpets. or whatever pair works.

AIUI, there are no good humidity gauges that the average person can afford. That would include the gauge the OP is checking the humidity with, and the gauge inside the humidifier that attempts to humidify the household air to a desired humidity.
OP, have you tried just turning that " round knob pointing to different numbers" to a higher number? Even if those numbers are supposed to be the percent humidity that the unit will deliver, that doesn't mean they are. The furnace control in the 50-apartment building I used to live in didn't attempt to give a temperature, only heat output, for which one could set it to A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H. I think only by trial and error did the first landlord** find what was the right setting. The analogy is not perfect, but I think that's how you'll find it too.
Maybe you can borrow another better than average hygrometer from someone.
Or just set the humidity to maximum, and when water starts dripping off your windows, etc. keep setting it down a little at a time until nothing bad is happening, no dripping anywhere that matters, and that will be the highest humidity your home can have, anyhow. Regardless of your hardware. Then mark that spot on your knob dial. And you can also probably find out what the %age is, and interpolate what all the other numbers on the dial mean.
It bothers me that he charged you for part of a service call because HE could not find anything wrong. Were you very clear that something WAS wrong. But in a way there's no point in crying over spilt milk, and just calibrate the humidifier yourself.
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On Saturday, November 22, 2014 5:23:59 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

Thanks for the warm reply! I have no carpet in the house and am wearing ba mboo slippers all the time, not sure how that's gonna affect static shock t hough. The 45% is actually the highest setting on this humidifier. I wish I could crank it up any higher lol. However I am seeing frost on the wind ow, is that a sign of too much humidity then? So I should probably never r ely on humidity measurement coming out of the register but instead just jud ge by the water on window. This whole measuring humidity thing actually sta rted because my wife woke up on a morning about two weeks ago telling me he r throat had been burning the whole night and she had to drink water every hour to feel a little better.
I put the humidistat on one of the return registers on the floor on first f loor this afternoon and it read 36%. This number actually is consistent wi th the humidistat by the humidifier, because when I turned the humidistat t o under 35%, it would stop the hot water feed to the humidifier. Maybe just like Stormin said, I might need two of these... Or maybe it's time to blea ch clean my portable one again XD.
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