Applying Pliobond - directions on bottle and on package aren't the same

In this case, looking to apply to running shoes per a recommendation in the running group.
Bottle says:
Apply Pliobond contact cement on both surfaces. If absorbed apply additional coats. Allow cement to almost dry Hold under pressure 10-15 minutes until dry, preferably overnight
Package says:
To clean dry surfaces apply a thin uniform coast to each surface. Permit both to dry completely. If one surface is extremely porous, apply a second coat and also permit to dry. When ready to assemble, apply an additional coast to either surface and when tacky press firmly together. Use pressure if possible during final bonding. The resulting bond permits rapid handling but total cure strength develops in about 7 days.
Any thoughts from previous experience? How would one apply pressure when using on running shoes? Someone mentioned using heat during application, how would that be done?
Thanks for all input
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Having used plibond daily for many years at work, but not on shoes, on rubber pads glued to metal.
coat thinly let dry, on both surfaces.
apply thin coat on both surfaces again let almost dry then put together, the longer the pressure the better.
do in well ventilated area, and let sit oivernite under pressure.
plibond is basic contact cement, its a brand name.
its very good bond, as long as you leave partially dry or it will take days to dry and stick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Heat: Hair dryer, mounted 1-3 ft away.
Pressure: some sort of vise system. Possibly a pipe clamp with two pcs of wood, or a bigger 2 pieces of wood, and 4 C-clamps. Or, no clamps, two pieces of wood, four 1/4" holes, and some threaded rod, washers, nuts for tightening. 7/16 wrench will help enormously.
Or 3+ pcs of wood: The two big pcs for the over all tightening, and an insert pc like an inner sole, and then a pc of a 2x4 between that and the big pc of wood. Least deformation of the shoe, best pressure were needed.
I'm assuming you are bonding a sole or sumpn on the shoe?
If just adding pliobond to one surface, with no other surface being bonded, then the notion of pressure in moot.
Altho, if you insist on pressure with just one surface, you could do exactly as above, and put paper between the pliobond and wood, and cut away the paper/let it wear off with use.
Pliobond is sort of hard to get (NYC, even). Where do you get yours?
--
PV\'d



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 14, 7:20pm, "Proctologically Violated"

At ACE Hardware, though I see it's available online which is where I would have gone if I hadn't located it locally.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can use large rubber bands to hold it together. I use bands that I made from old bike tubes. Bands of any size can be made by cutting a tube lengthwise. You can let the glue set up as long as half an hour before bringing together. After mating the surfaces, turn the shoe over and beat on the sole with a mallet or hammer over the entire surface. This is called "stitching" in the industry.
Here is an alternate means of repairing without using pressure or contact cement. Shoe Goo, Plumber's Goop, RV Goop, Automotive Goop and so on are the same formula. Buy the cheapest. It sticks very well to clean buffed rubber. However, it does not wear very well. So find a source of rubber such as pieces from old shoes, floor mats, or tire shreds. The best wearing surface I have found is from sliced up tires. You want pieces no larger than about 3/4" square. They can be of any shape and can be smaller. Coat the surface to be repaired with a thin layer of Goop. Then take your small repair pieces and coat each and place it on the shoe, moving it back and forth to smear the glue. When the area is "tiled" with pieces no closer than1/8" apart, fill in the missing space with more Goop. The product dries by solvent evaporation so it will shrink somewhat. After it sets, you can add more Goop to the receded areas. Allow two days before running on the shoe. Fumes from this glue are harmful to breath so work outdoors or take the shoes outside to dry. Goop is available at hardware stores and department store hardware departments. Wal-Mart has the cheapest at about $2.97 for the Plumbing Goop.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.