Appliance industry warns....

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There's gold in them there hills (of sludge)
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150323075239.htm
<<In a recent Environmental Science & Technology paper another research group also studying this issue calculated that the waste from 1 million Americans could contain as much as $13 million worth of metals. That's money that could help fuel local economies.>>
--
Bobby G.



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On 7/23/15 4:41 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Some could come from plumbing or motor oil washed down sewers.
Years ago, the Sunday newspaper magazine had an interview with a nationally know endocrinologist who said Americans were getting half the magnesium they were getting in 1911, and they probably weren't getting enough then. He said every age-related disease is associated with low magnesium. Endocrinology went so far as to advocate adding it to water supplies.
Other branches of medicine ignore magnesium in favor of costly patented drugs. For example, in the 1950s, a Scandinavian heart doctor found that intravenous Epson salt reduced heart-attack mortality from 20% to 2%. Other heart doctors got similar results. They found that it was important to administer it quickly, and too strong a solution could be harmful. For 40 years, that two-cent "miracle drug" was kept on hospital crash carts.
In the 1990s, Bayer, who made costly heart drugs, sponsored a worldwide study that affected 50,000 victims. Their protocol called for a solution that had been proved too strong, and a delay of up to 24 hours. Naturally, the results weren't good. Heart doctors read the results and quit using magnesium, which helped Bayer's profits.
One way the body uses magnesium is to get rid of heavy metals. We were told mad cow disease was caused by an infectious organism that survives incineration. If it survives incineration, it's not an organism. They were hiding the fact that the outbreaks happened in herds where the UK government had mandated systemic insecticide. In the brain, copper, a heavy metal, formed destructive molecules. A farmer protected his cattle by getting a lawyer and refusing to apply the poison to his herd. He then purchased two cows. When he found they were "infected," he added Epsom salt to their drinking water. One returned to normal. The other's brain didn't heal, but he stopped the progression of the disease.
Similar brain-wasting diseases affect deer, sheep, and humans only in areas deficient in magnesium. Manganese is the usual culprit, but it's harmless if the animal has adequate magnesium. That's why wolves who eat "infected" deer don't get the disease.
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Dirtbags from the git.
Isn't magnesium the med we need, but there's a limit to how much you can buy as a supplement?
nb
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On 7/24/15 3:40 PM, notbob wrote:

I'm skeptical of pills. If the supplement gets to the intestine, it may not be absorbed and may interfere with the absorption of calcium.
Fifteen years ago, people could see I was deathly I'll, and the cause was a mystery. An endocrinologist (a PhD and not an MD) said my small intestine was full of holes. He recommended cooked carrots with butter for Vitamin A, and Epsom salt for magnesium.
In a few weeks I was better and quit the Epsom salt. After a couple of months, my digestion was still fine, but I realized I was doing worse in other ways. I resumed the Epsom salt and never regretted it.
If you took a teaspoon or two of Epsom salt, it would get to the intestine and, by holding water, act as a laxative. My adviser recommended 1/8 tsp in a glass of water 3 times a day. An eighth tsp is only about 60 mg. The old RDA was 400 mg, and some say it should be 1000. That little bit in a glass of water isn't much to correct a deficiency.
I began mixing 1/2 tsp per pint of water and keeping it in a clear plastic sports bottle in the counter. Like an animal going to a salt lick, I'd take a drink when I had a taste for magnesium. Typically, I drink two bottles a day. That would be 500 mg, half the RDA some recommend. The dilution helps my stomach absorb it quickly, like a shot of liquor on an empty stomach. Come to think of it, it affects me a little like liquor. I feel refreshed, relaxed, and energized.
Last Christmas, three different people gave me chocolate candy. For a week or so, I ate a lot of candy. I noticed my thirst for magnesium water shot up to about four bottles a day. One function of magnesium is to get insulin into the cells, where it belongs, and more sugar requires more insulin. I guess magnesium is lost in the process. If insulin has trouble getting into the cells, that's insulin resistance, which leads to diabetes.
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On 7/24/2015 5:47 PM, J Burns wrote:

I've never heard of drinking a dilution of Epsom salt before. Is it something that only works for certain blood types, or something that's common for everyone?
--
Maggie

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On 7/24/15 8:40 PM, Muggles wrote:

It's not common, but for many centuries, people have drunk mineral water for their health. Magnesium seems to be the most important mineral in mineral water. I think of my mix as homemade mineral water, just enough magnesium to give it a taste that hits the spot.
People used to bathe in mineral springs for their health. Until the last few decades, it was common to bathe in homemade mineral water: Epsom salt in a bath tub. You can absorb it a lot faster that way than by drinking. They joke that the only danger from all that magnesium is that maybe it will be so relaxing that you'll fall asleep and drown.
A few years ago, I met my neighbor's father when he came in his pickup truck to rake and haul away leaves. At 93, he was physically and mentally as spry as any teen I've known. Later, my friend recalled that every Saturday night, his father bathed in Epsom salt.
I read of a British experiment where the magnesium in subjects' urine was tracked during a regimen of an Epsom salt bath every two days. (Or was it four days?) IIRC, it took four baths for magnesium measurements to level out. If excretion was less than intake for three big doses (baths), it was taken to mean all subjects were quite deficient.
Doctors advise taking aspirin to reduce the chance of coronary thrombosis. Research has shown that only buffered aspirin works. What's the difference? Buffered aspirin has magnesium, which is vital in regulating clotting. Why take aspirin, which could cause bleeding problems, when magnesium won't?
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On 7/24/2015 9:18 PM, J Burns wrote:

No kidding? I'm going to have to try that because some nights I just don't sleep well because of a painful bursitis in my hip. I hate taking pain killers cuz they make me feel groggy the next morning. I think I'll try it tonight, too. Thanks for the tip.

I've got some epsom salt, so I'll see how that works for me. I appreciate the information.
--
Maggie

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On 7/24/15 11:27 PM, Muggles wrote:

Years ago I persuaded my sister to try it. She raved about how much energy it gave her in the morning. She said she was afraid to take any after noon because something that potent would keep her awake all night. I told her the same mineral that perks me up like coffee in the morning, relaxes me like a nightcap at bedtime.
My brother contacted me in desperation. Doctors were prescribing sedatives, but he hadn't been sleeping. I told him about Epsom salt. If you're deficient in magnesium, your brain may have trouble switching down to a rest mode. He tried it, quit the drugs, and raved about it.
My sister insisted on putting a little Epsom salt in her hand and washing it down with water. Mixing Epsom salt in water worked well for my brother, but he changed to pills because he felt that was the proper way to take a supplement.
I think they're wrong. If you dilute it and drink it, it will reach your blood quickly, and your body will associate the effects with the taste. That way, it can tell you when more would be good, just as it tells you how fast to breathe. Your consumption can vary according to your requirement that day.
My aunt is a retired nurse. She began keeping a bottle on the counter because I recommended it. She says she knows it's good because it tastes better than tap water. That's why I drink it, too. It tastes good because it had good effects.

Most of what's for sale says USP. That means it's safe to swallow. USP grade can have up to 1% impurities, IIRC, but they're known to be safe. Periodically, I've used baking soda to clean out a brownish deposit in the bottom of my bottle. I think maybe it came from iron in the Epsom salt.
My last container of Epsom salt was a four-pound Rexall bag. Recently I started using a 1-pound Rexall bag. My first drink was a disappointment. It tasted like tap water! In a couple of minutes I knew it was Epsom salt because it had hit the spot. I guess what I've been tasting all these years was a trace mineral in the Epsom salt. Maybe the Rexall salt is now more purified, or maybe it comes from a different mine. I feel like a beer drinker whose favorite brand is no longer available!
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Jul snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: "I have never understood where the heavy metal thing came from. Do that many people eat heavy metals? Must be all of that Led Zeppelin they listened to in the 70s. "
Funny! Heavy metals include Lead, Mercury, Aluminum, and Cadmium.
Lead accumulated from drinking water passing through pipes with lead joints.
Mercury is a by-product of burning coal for energy, and was also used widely in dental fillings. Also a preservative in many vaccines.
Aluminum was present as a preservative in foods, cookware was made of it, and it was in deoderant. Still is, but now you can buy aluminum free deoderant. Aluminum is linked to dementia and Alzheimers, short term memory loss.
Cadmium? In cigarettes, and in all those batteries that ended up in landfills and infiltrated the water table.
And you wonder why SO MANY PEOPLE ARE SICK ALL THE TIME? And why Autism and other disorders now affect the MAJORITY of school-age children?
The 19th & 20th centuries - industrial era begins and humans are exposed to toxins on an unprecedented level their bodies could never begin to cope with! Trace amounts are one thing, but this is wholesale onslaught.
Reduce/eliminate exposure to heavy metals and preservatives in food, and chronic illness, mental disorders, and other disabilities will also be reduced.
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wrote in message wrote: "I have never understood where the heavy metal thing came from. Do that many people eat heavy metals? Must be all of that Led Zeppelin they listened to in the 70s. "
Funny! Heavy metals include Lead, Mercury, Aluminum, and Cadmium.
Lead accumulated from drinking water passing through pipes with lead joints.
Mercury is a by-product of burning coal for energy, and was also used widely in dental fillings. Also a preservative in many vaccines.
Aluminum was present as a preservative in foods, cookware was made of it, and it was in deoderant. Still is, but now you can buy aluminum free deoderant. Aluminum is linked to dementia and Alzheimers, short term memory loss.
I wonder can I sue the Uncle Sam for negligence because I am starting to get Alzheimer's
Cadmium? In cigarettes, and in all those batteries that ended up in landfills and infiltrated the water table.
And you wonder why SO MANY PEOPLE ARE SICK ALL THE TIME? And why Autism and other disorders now affect the MAJORITY of school-age children?
The 19th & 20th centuries - industrial era begins and humans are exposed to toxins on an unprecedented level their bodies could never begin to cope with! Trace amounts are one thing, but this is wholesale onslaught.
Reduce/eliminate exposure to heavy metals and preservatives in food, and chronic illness, mental disorders, and other disabilities will also be reduced.
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tony944:
Instead of suing the govt perhaps you should listen to Pacifica Radio(WBAI) more often.
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