Appliance industry warns....

Page 3 of 6  
On 7/25/2015 2:36 PM, FrozenNorth wrote:

Yours is a typo for "typo".
Love those comic moments.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 5:01 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

--
Froz...

Quando omni flunkus, moritati
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 5:23 PM, FrozenNorth wrote:

I've dome that enough time, I get over it.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 1:36 PM, FrozenNorth wrote:

ok thanks
--
Maggie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 2:08 PM, Muggles wrote:

You'd need to be a chemist, not a plumber. The expression is "add" acid to the water, never the reverse. In the case of sulphuric acid, it's possible (when adding water to acid) that the water will float over the top of the heavier sulphric acid, and not mix properly. Other things go wrong, also.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 4:00 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

ok I'll make sure I add the acid to the water and not the other way around.
--
Maggie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 5:20 PM, Muggles wrote:

I vaguely remember a film in chemistry class of doing it wrong. The mix got hot, and blew acid and water every which what way.
Yep, film. 16 MM with sound.
Fortunately, in the toilet example there is water in the bowl, and adding acid to water, correctly so. If there is some acid left, a flush down the drain has enough swirling and stirring action that it's a non issue.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 25 Jul 2015 22:02:34 -0400, Stormin Mormon

The little poem my HS chem teacher taught us was:
If you're doing what you aughter Add the acid to the water May your rest be long and placid If you add the water to the acid

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 10:10 PM, Gordon Shumway wrote:

I never took chemistry. That's the first time I've seen that little poem.
--
Maggie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 11:44 PM, Muggles wrote:

It's more of a concern with concentrated sulphuric acid. Sulphuric is heavier than water, and some what viscous.
Less a concern with hydrochloric acid.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/26/2015 7:48 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Another dumb question here: If mixing h.acid and water can be bad if you pour water into the h.acid, why isn't it bad if you pour the acid into the water? Is the action of pouring the acid into the water enough to make them mix enough to not cause a bad reaction?
I was wondering if I should stir the water by flushing first and when it's almost done filling and the waters still moving that's when I should add the acid because it would mix better? The CLR did a great job on the sides and rim, and I have half the container left and was going to use it on the calcium that's left in the very bottom where the S trap is located. If that doesn't work on the S trap calcium I'm going to buy some of the muriatic acid and use a small amount of that to finish up. I'll have some left if I need it in the future, too.
--
Maggie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/26/2015 10:55 AM, Muggles wrote:

other way around the acid will be what splashes.
--
Froz...

Quando omni flunkus, moritati
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 9:02 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

So, if I buy a container of muriatic acid, I have the use the entire container at one time? I can't use just part of it now and the rest at a later date?
--
Maggie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 11:25 PM, Muggles wrote:

that

I added some [text] to my last comments. I wasn't very clear. You can use part of the acid now, and part later. Please don't add water to the acid that is in the store container.
Sorry about being unclear. Ah, well. That's why we communicate back and forth.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 10:51 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

ahh ok ...I got it. Thanks for clarifying. :)
--
Maggie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/21/2015 10:38 AM, songbird wrote:

Or, rinse at the sink to move the toilet solids down the pipe?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or it could end up with dishwashers that can actually clean dishes with that little water. Or have people lost their faith in modern technology? Is it so impossible to believe such dishwashers can be created? Cars used to get 11 MPG and now they get incredible higher mileage out of the same single gallon of gasoline. Why? Because the Feds pushed the industry to do so. The free market resisted every step of the way. It falls completely flat when it comes to doing things that make things better for everyone. Case in point: Set top cable boxes. The industry didn't care about making them green because someone else paid for the electricity to run them. New rules will make them care and they'll howl, too. For a while, anyway and the US may save enough electricity in the aggregate to retire more than one coal-fired plant.
http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-power-hog-20140617-story.html
<<The 224 million cable boxes across the nation together consume as much electricity as produced by four giant nuclear reactors, running around the clock. . . ."It is a classic case of market failure," said Andrew McAllister, a member of the California Energy Commission. "The consumers have zero information and zero control over the devices they get."
It's actually a fascinating study in free market failures because people often have no choice (or even information) about how they could save money.
<<Similarly, tenants in millions of apartments pay for electricity, but landlords decide whether they get efficient appliances, modern air conditioning systems and good building insulation. >>
Remember how the auto industry screamed about how pollution controls were going to bankrupt the industry and make cars unaffordable? That never happened, but the air did get cleaner as the Feds mandated higher MPG and lower emissions.
Eventually, after all the weeping and gnashing of teeth, the auto industry (especially the foreign makers like Honda) finally started building cleaner cars that resulted in healthier outcomes and cleaner air for everyone.
The MPG standards have played a very significant role in reducing our dependence on oil sources controlled by religious fanatics, and that's a very good thing.
The water restrictions come at in important time when many of the country's (actually the world's) aquifiers are being drained to previously unheard of levels.
<http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/08/140819-groundwater- california-drought-aquifers-hidden-crisis/> Areas where wells used to find water at 300 now require drilling to two or three times that depth. We're in the midst of a serious *world* water crisis. Clean water is a precious resource that's becoming more precious every day. Why waste it if technology can provide a better solution?
If you believe some sci fi writers from when I was kid, we would at least have sonic dishwashers that used NO water or self-cleaning dishes.
Despite all the groaning about the alleged horrors of low-volume toilets, they have become the norm. With modern low-volume toilets, the worst that *usually* happens is you may occasionally have to flush twice. I like seeing both my water bill and my electric bill shrink. I bought a whole bunch of LED bulbs and expect it to shrink further. Almost all my 23W nVision CFLs now take too long to warm up to be useful in most cases.
I wonder if we will ever see truly "cold light" that emits all energy in the visible spectrum. We're slowly getting there, it seems.
The problem I have is that the price point sweet spot seems to be for 60W equivalent LEDs and they are just too dim for these old eyes. I got a bunch of socket splitters and they've allowed me to double up in some fixtures but fixtures that were designed to use two LEDs would be better - it would give an equivalence of slight over 100W still for less than a 100W equivalent CFL. But even if the cost were the same, I'd opt for the no-mercury LED every time. CFLs will eventually be phased out.
--
Bobby G.



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/21/15 10:59 AM, Robert Green wrote:

on bulbs.
Three years ago, I got one whose 8-degree beam has the intensity of nine 100-watt incandescent bulbs on medium and runs 4 or 5 hours on a AA cell. If that's not enough, high has the intensity of 25 100W bulbs.
That could be inconveniently narrow and intense indoors. Lately, I got a second headlamp with a 23-degree beam. On high, the intensity is equal to six 100W bulbs. On medium its equal to two 100W bulbs.
Usually, I'll run a bulb for a little ambient lighting. If I want a good look at what I'm doing, I wear a headlamp.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 07/21/2015 10:56 AM, J Burns wrote:
[snip]

One thing about LEDs is that with most the light is WHITE rather then the yellow of incandescents.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/21/15 1:14 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

not the color. (Cree posts lots of color information for their bulbs.)
My second one, with the wider beam, seemed yellow compared to the first. When I compared it to a full-spectrum light, it was pretty close. Indoors, I like it. It has enough yellow to be cheery, and it shows dirt better if I'm cleaning something.
I'd thought the outdoor light was white, but I guess it doesn't have much yellow. Somehow, that makes it better for identifying an object 100 feet away.
My CFL bulbs are much too yellow for my taste. The package says only "soft white."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.