Apartment building fire

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wrote:

I first saw it listed as an "African Pit Bull" on some animal site along with a flyer from a telephone pole that said "Found - unfriendly cat, no collar, bad teeth" with a picture of a possum.
-- Bobby G.
-- Bobby G.
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On 4/2/2011 8:28 AM, Robert Green wrote:

There's a group of images of that guy and several others with all sorts of "guard critters". I'll try to recall where they are posted. ^_^
TDD
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The windows I understand, as the fire department needs to vent the heat and smoke before they clear the scene to make sure that the fire is actually put out and won't flashover again after they leave...
But the doors ? Did this building not have a knox lockbox for keys ?
Seems like something you would want to look into...
~~ Evan
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They just used the ax on everything, its more fun I guess. And all the tenants were home, alarms were blaring, but they busted the front and rear apartment doors,
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Tenants being home means nothing, some doors will lock behind a person leaving requiring a key to enter... When people are running for their lives they don't stop to collect their keys...
Fire Departments HATE to use force to gain entry... Think of it this way -- every door that has to be forced open in non-lifesaving situation is a potential for an on-duty accident and disability, that is a large risk exposure for routine entry scenarios... They would rather use a set of keys reserved for their exclusive use secured on the premises in a knox system keybox...
It sounds as if your building doesn't have one... You should talk to the people in the fire prevention office/inspection office with the Fire Department about installing one... A few hundred dollars now is worth not having to spend that each time a door must be opened and you or your tenants aren't at home to unlock a door...
~~ Evan
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wrote:

There's a much, much worse word you can hear from your adjuster: Coinsurance. I discovered that if you do not insure for the promised limit of insurance your become a co-insurer when a loss occurs. You get to share in the payout burden with the insurance company in paying part of the loss. Policies typical require you insure to at least 90% of the property's value.
For example a $240,000 value at the time of loss multiplied by 80% coinsurance (a factor of .80) equals $192,000.
$160,000 limits at the time of loss divided by 192,000, the limit required (at the typical 90% coinsurance rate required in your contract) equals a coinsurance penalty factor of .833.
$100,000 amount of loss multiplied by the .833 penalty factor equals $83,300
$83,300 minus the $2,000 deductible equals $81,300
The insurance company pays $81,300. You pay the remainder.
The math has most likely got an error in it, but anyone who's suffered a loss in the last few years who hasn't substantially upgraded their policy has likely run into this. It's very common in times of rapidly rising housing values. "You know about coinsurance? were the first words out of my adjustor's mouth *after* the fire. )-:
-- Bobby G.
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Define "re-done"...
Gutted to the studs and rebuilt out ?
Refinished floors, painted walls, redid kitchens ?
~~ Evan
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Just a complete remodel in 07, complete kitchens, baths, some bath walls, tubs, sand wood floors, new kitchen floors, new dual pane windows, some new doors, new fixtures.
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As much work as you did then it was all surface work except for the new kitchens, fixtures and windows...
A lot of value added exists inside the walls with plumbing and wiring and having modern facilities for the tenants to access cable and internet services...
~~ Evan
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But if it comes through all openings like switches, sockets, fixtures, then what you are saying is the wall has to be opened up, so then the studs can be sealed with primer. its basicly gut everything where there is smoke inside walls?
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On Fri, 1 Apr 2011 12:25:27 -0700 (PDT), ransley

I think you should talk to a bunch of pros, who do fire restoration for a living, and try to figure out what is likely to happen.
It seems only one or two people here have addressed your particular question.
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I have talked to pros, but here I have gotten good info that confirms what they say. A contractor wants more work, everyone here has no motive for bs. It all helps to put it all in perspective.
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Ransley if this is such a concern, and you have that much air movement inside the walls of your building, open up the bottom 6" to 8" of wall around the perimeter of every room and firestop every penetration no matter how small with the intumescent goop around every wire and pipe... If no air can move through the walls no odors can move either...
The only concern I would have would be how raunchy things would get if you had some sort of a leak in one of the smoke damaged units down the line and you hadn't gutted and encapsulated the non-damaged non-removable structural elements that have smoke smell in them now...
~~ Evan
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And the pipes are from 1922. I guess a roof leak might do the same. This whole problem is overwhelming.
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Unless you plan on washing and painting the inside of all your duct work (or replacing), there will always be a "possibility" for a smoke- like smell to return.
From a financial standpoint, Seal as much as you can like the electrical outlets, woodwork and etc., clean and paint everything you can. There are Fire Restoration companies that can give you more advice and what to use.
Let Google be your friend
Hank <~~~ 27 yr Firefighter
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On Wed, 30 Mar 2011 17:08:49 -0700 (PDT), ransley

Sorry to hear this.

Only a trifle. And the fire was elsewhere so this is just how long the wood smelled.
Long ago, I came across a 6' wide, 6' high booksshelf that was badly buurned on one side and someone burned on the other (on the backboard 80 square inches of iirc perforated masonite and one side 40 square inches of 1" wood.) I went into the hardware store a few feet away, bought a saw, cut it in half and took the good half home. It smelled of smoke for 3 to 9 months**, the best I can recall, but less and less of course, and after it stopped smelling hot and humid weather didn't bring the small back.
**I'm sure it would have been longer if I had put my nose up to the burnt wood, but I'm only going by what I noticed when I came in the house.

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wrote:

Maybe I should add that I did nothing to the burnt wood that was left to get rid of the smell. I didn't expect it to last so long, and I don't think I wanted to spend time scraping off the ash and charcoal.
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Things air out, but closed walls?
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