Anything I can pour into water heater that will dissolve deposits?

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And adding a strong acid to that will do what? Got a pressure valve?
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Nobody around here softens their water because the mineral content is so high a softener would be exhausted almost immediately. Evaporation forms black rings inside the toilet bowl that won't come off without chemical help.
A water softener contains cation and anion exchangers that replace calcium and magnesium with sodium, and carbonates and sulfates with chloride. Again, because water is scarce here in the Sonoran Desert, the backwashing needed to regenerate the filter would be an unconscionable waste.
DB
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wrote:

I'm 25 miles south of Tucson in Green Valley so my water quality must be close to yours. Very hard! I'd guess that over half the people here have softeners. We don't yet because there's no iron in the water to discolor things. I'm sure we'd have one if we had a basement like everywhere else we've lived. It's hard to redo the plumbing when everything's buried under the slab. So the options are 100% softened which we don't want. Or only hot water softened which doesn't work out well since the cold water is so warm.
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If you absolutely must experiment with a scale dissolving acid, use oxalic acid, which you can buy as automotive radiator flush. It is more potent than acetic acid, and far less harmful than muriatic (hydrochloric) acid. $$-wise it will be less costly, but you're still going to spend a fair amount, since the capacity of a typical automotive system (one package) is 1/10th or less of a water heater. HTH
Joe
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wrote:

Whirlpool recommends: turn the power off; close both valves; disconnect the hot water pipe; drain a little more than a gallon of water; pour one gallon of cider vinegar into the hot water fitting; let it set for 6 hours; drain/refill/flush 3 times; put back in service.
--Andy Asberry-- ------Texas-----
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