Anyone under 60 and healthy?

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Utter nonsense. The counterexamples abound.

More bullshit.
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Hi, My only beef against most G.P. is lack of understanding for nutrition. Often they think person's diet has no bearing on their illness. Eating habit is big part of health. Another thing, there is no such thing as perfect medicine. It gives some and and takes some in the form of side effect. Every individual has different response to the side effect often to a point of dropping the prescription. I have woman customer whose kidney was shutting down from a drug prescribed for diabetic condition. Luckily she saved here kidneys and quit taking that particular medicine. Her doc. try to treat the kidney problem separate from the med. he prescribed. Some suffer from great muscle, joint pain taking Statin family drugs for cholesterol, I often hear "I'd rather die from cholesterol than suffering this much pain" The pain is so bad they can't function normally. I saw little boy's pancreas shutting down from reaction to anti-biotic. Lucky he did not lose the pancreas.
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On 2/3/2014 11:08 AM, Peter wrote:

I think there are a lot of conditions where the body doesn't work properly, but medications can make up for that. Allergies, diabetes, chronic pain, migraines, etc. I like your view point, that in many cases that medicated people can be "healthy".
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    You must be from the new brood. I suppose if someone has "uncontrolled" high cholesterol, that would make them "disabled".     ;)     Gotta larf, what those drug companies stuff down young MD's throats. They offer me trips to Europe if I prescribe their trash. Ha. Not me, I'd rather die honest.     []'s
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On 2/3/2014 7:26 PM, Shadow wrote:

I don't think you've read my reply in the context of the original posting. And, I'm not part of any "new brood"; I'm a senior citizen.
I never said or implied that no physicians accept pharmaceutical freebies. I said that such freebies rarely meet State standards for continuing medical education. Personally, I never accepted those invitations, found private practice too mercenary, and spent 30 years on active duty as a medical officer in the military. I happen to agree with your criticism of the pharmaceutical companies and although physicians cannot be compelled to sign a promise to prescribe in return for the freebies, the companies' intent is clearly apparent and those M.D.s' bias to prescribe accordingly has been well documented, even when it is a subconscious bias. You jumped to entirely unwarranted conclusions.
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On 2/3/14 9:00 PM, Peter wrote:

There is a not yet approved method to stop bleeding from gunshots: http://tinyurl.com/ljdq8c9 (Popular Science)
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On 2/3/2014 9:28 PM, Dean Hoffman > wrote:

For some time, soldiers have been using over the counter tampons produced for monthly female hygiene to plug gunshot wounds. I can imagine the scene when a medic pulls a pink package out of his pack while treating a soldier who's been shot. Soldiers are very good at improvising during times of war. ^_^
TDD
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On 2/4/2014 10:15 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

A major military medical research effort for many years has been how to control bleeding/stabilize severely injured personnel in the field, prior to their access to surgical care. Both the Army and Navy have invested in those efforts, and specialized dressings etc. have been developed which are also finding use in the civilian community, e.g., for people in remote areas sustaining severe injuries and for use by EMTs treating severe trauma.
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If I recall correctly, it was the military medical folks who pioneered the use of cyanoacrylate adhesives for wound closure.
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    I retired as a family doctor, years ago. (> 35 years practice, when I was almost perfect, I had to retire ....). In my country, family medicine is state-run, a very corrupt state, so we have to ignore the leaflets they hand out and study in those tediously thick text-books. And even double check them for biased text.     I don't jump to conclusions.     I just thought your choice of "high cholesterol" when we were discussing disability was not wisely made. A stroke, heart attack, severe liver or kidney failure, something like that would be more convincing.     FWIW         []'s
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On 2/3/2014 10:28 PM, Shadow wrote:

Shadow, perhaps we have an English language comprehension problem? As a trained doctor, surely you know that most patients who have had a stroke or have severe liver or kidney failure are at least partially disabled. My original reply questioned the OP's apparent belief that anyone merely taking prescription meds for a chronic condition met the definition of disabled.
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    Nothing lethal, but English is not my first language. Almost all medical books are in English, unless you want to fool around with acupuncture and homeopathy. I don't, so my grasp of English is probably OK.

    Yep. What I said.

//"Speaking as a MD, I believe that if someone is taking prescription medication for a chronic condition, and that condition is being well controlled (no medication side effects and no detectable damage to any organ system from the chronic condition), that person should be considered healthy. (Examples might include well controlled high blood pressure and well controlled high blood cholesterol if they were diagnosed and managed soon after onset - among some other chronic conditions.) "//
    I did the inverse of your logic.
    "Examples might include well controlled ...<remove high blood pressure>..cholesterol if they were diagnosed and managed soon after onset ."
    And if they were not ? I often get patients that have had high cholesterol for decades with little organic damage. Like I said, you chose a bad example. Cholesterol levels are a minor factor in vascular disease. Not what the drug companies want us to believe. GENETICS, smoking, Obesity, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, severe alcoholism, and sedentarism play much bigger roles. I consider stress a secondary factor as it might cause any of the above, minus genetics.Did I forget any ?     []'s
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On 2/4/2014 1:54 PM, Shadow wrote:

Our comments are tangential to each others' comments, not directly addressing them. I didn't mean to imply that high serum cholesterol, even if uncontrolled, is a debilitating condition. I was indicating that I disagreed with the OP, who seemed to believe that a person chronically taking a prescription drug for a chronic condition (note: I'm saying "condition" and not "disease" or "disability") IS by definition "unhealthy".
I completely agree with the details of your most recent reply. High cholesterol is being used both by big Pharma (not surprising), and seems to be accepted by the FDA (rather surprising) as a valid surrogate marker for cardiovascular disease and although there strong evidence to support an association between the two, I'm not convinced that high cholesterol is the cause. Both my parents ate a diet high in total fat and saturated fat. Both were extremely sedentary. Both had marginally controlled hypertension. Both had total serum cholesterol readings in the high 200s. Neither ever had any signs or symptoms of cerebrovascular or cardiovascular disease. Both died in their early 90s of non-cardiovascular causes. I agree that genetics is by far the most significant factor in an individual's likelihood of developing serious cardiovascular disease.
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On 2/3/2014 10:00 PM, Peter wrote:

I prefer capitalism over socialism. But both are known to bias the thinking of physicians. I'd rather have doctors carrying pocket full of Metamucil tongue depressors, opposed to having to phone a bureaucrat in Washington every time the MD wants to prescribe acetaminophen.
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On 2/4/2014 8:29 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Bogus assertion. Never happened. Regardless of the system of practice, physician choices may be constrained by logistical and financial issues (either the patient's or the medical care system). How about the common problem of a private physician believing that a certain med is most appropriate for a specific private patient, but that patient's insurance won't cover the cost of that med and it costs far more than the patient can afford out of pocket?
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On 2/4/2014 9:22 AM, Peter wrote:

Just cause something "never happened", I can still prefer one over the other. I'd prefer a solar flare that wipes out all life on Earth, over a meteor strike that knocks a bunch of dust into the atmosphere and kills us all in a few months.
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Christopher A. Young
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On 2/4/2014 9:22 AM, Peter wrote:

I'd rather have an insurance company be unable to pay for the med (or the patient) rather than a bureaucrat in Washington denying permission for the med.
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Christopher A. Young
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On 2/4/2014 10:02 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

As someone who falls squarely into the category of "Washington bureaucrat" for the final 14 years of my military medical career, I very strongly resent the implication of your statement.
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wrote:

You were Army and you noted you did not have direct control over what was paid for and what wasn't. BIG difference in this context.
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Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive,
but what they conceal is vital.
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On 2/4/2014 1:39 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

Sorry Kurt. I never said I was Army (and never was). As a practitioner I didn't have direct control over my office's budget.
Most of my career was Navy. When I became a bureaucrat, I had almost total control over what was paid for and what was not. My annual research budget at one point was about $20M/yr, and that was mid 1990s $$. Later on, I had final say-so (known as second level review) over whether others could or could not spend money from their own budgets and the sum of those budgets collectively totaled several hundred $M/yr. It was a great assignment. I had a lot of authority but very little responsibility.
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