Anyone heard of Emerson/White Rodgers "Cool Savings" feature on their thermostats?

I have an Emerson thermostat that claims to have a feature called cool savings...
I tried to Google this feature and Emerson says its designed to adjust the programmed set point temperature during high demand use of a central air conditioner. I think they mean that the thermostat will call on the variable speed fan/ECM fan will blow faster to similate cooler air, without the compressor running all the time, but that's just my guess
I can't really get any more information other than that.
I've only had this blower unit/furnace and thermostat for 4 months so no history with it. Today was first day using the aircond this year however A coil and compressor unit are 14 years old, and were run on a different thermostat the past 13 summers.
Anyone care to explain what this feature is and how it works? Emerson "Cool Savings"
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No idea but I doubt it's going to increase the blower speed to simulate cooler air during high demand. First I don't think that would get you anywhere because whatever speed the blower runs at in all the homes I've been involved with you never feel any real breeze or air movement. So it's hard to imagine you're going to please customers by fooling with fan speed when it's hot to save what? A couple bucks? A ceiling fan, that's a different story because it blows directly on you And I'd bet that 14 year old AC is a single stage. In which case, again in all the cases I've seen the furnace blower then runs at the highest speed when cooling.
Some newer furnaces/AC have features to run the AC on low for humidity control, but that doesn't appear to be what they are talking about. Most likely it's what we call marketing BS. The fact that there is no explanation probably tells you something.
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On 5/21/2012 9:24 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Maybe it runs the indoor fan for 1-2 mins after the compressor shuts down, to blow all the cool air in the evaporator into the living spaces.
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On 5/28/2012 9:02 PM, Congoleum Breckenridge wrote:

From the thermostat's manual:
"With Cool Savings enabled, the thermostat will make small adjustments to the setpoint temperature during periods of high demand to reduce AC system running time and save energy. When the cooling system has been running for more than 20 minutes, humidity in the home will be lower and a higher temperature will feel comfortable. After 20 minutes of run time, the thermostat will start increasing the setpoint temperature in steps of less than one degree as the system continues to run. These adjustments will eventually cause the system to satisfy the thermostat to turn the system off and reduce the energy consumption. When the Cool Savings feature is active and making adjustments, the display will flash 'Cool Savings'. The amount of the adjustments to the setpoint temperature is dependent on the Cool Savings value that is set, 1 being the least adjustment and 6 being the most adjustment . With this feature set to OFF, no change will occur when the AC system is continuously running during the periods of high demand. Periods of high demand will normally occur during the late afternoon and early evening on the hottest days of the summer . As demand lessens the adjustments to setpoint temperature are reversed until setpoint temperature returns to normal and 'CoolSavings' no longer flashes."
In short: when you activate the Cool Savings option, after the a/c has been running for at least 20 minutes it will gradually raise the thermostat's temperature setting, which will shut off the a/c. You choose whether to use the option, and you choose how drastic of a temperature rise you are prepared to tolerate to save on energy.
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On Sunday, May 20, 2012 10:41:30 PM UTC-4, Duesenberg wrote:

I've read the manual, too, but I am still confused. It says "amount of adjustments". Does it mean "number of adjustments" or "amount of adjustment" (so 's'). It's quite common to use the word "amount" when the word "number" is meant. So, if it's "amount of adjustment" (no 's'), then the smaller the amount of adjustment for each adjustment (i.e., just a little adjustment for each adjustment), the longer the compressor runs; hence, for the most energy savings, I would want the value to be set to 6. (i.e., a big adjustment for each adjustment causes the compressor to turn off sooner). On the other hand, if it means "number of adjustments", the smaller the number of adjustments, the sooner the compressor shuts off; hence, for the most energy savings, I would want the value to be set to 1. (one adjustment [each adjustment is less than one degree], and the compressor turns off.)
So, which is it: "amount of adjustment" (no 's') or "number of adjustments" ??
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On Jul 2, 6:12pm, karen snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net wrote:

Without having the manual or a link to the manual, I doubt anyone here is going to know what section you're reading and what it means. The "cool savings" feature I explained many posts ago and it's also covered in the video that's referenced in the thread.
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