Anyone have a trick for getting Husqvarna chainsaw brake kickback spring back on?

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Won't work. The problem is that one end of the spring has a nylon prong thing blocking the center of the spring. Even if you could compress the spring fully, there's no way to insert the nylon prong thing with the brake spring compression pliers in place.
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"Jeff Liebermann" <

LMAO at all the responses! The only way to install it is to shoehorn it in. Go look in the silverware drawer, there may be a serving spoon in it with a rounded end of the handle to match the spring O.D. If the guy in the video can compress it with needle nose pliers then you sure can compress it with a shoehorn type tool! Sure that spring is strong but not _that_ strong. It is after all seated into a magnesium cover, how strong is that cover? And with the needle nose plier stunt, the spring can only be inserted half way putting a terrible strain on the lips of that mag. pocket! dannyd has already admitted to breaking his. So, good luck to you guys out there, I'm gonna shut my trap now and enjoy the comments... ;>)} BTDT
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Phil Kangas wrote, on Fri, 20 Feb 2015 15:45:43 -0500:

Well, I undid the tape and tried to straighten the spring in the saw itself, using the brake as the lever.
But, I had to have the cover on halfway only (because it wouldn't fit over the drum due to the brake itself being contracted).
And the spring sprung.
So, now I'm back at the beginning. Step 1 is relatively easy (which is getting the spring in place). It's step 2 that's hard (loosening the brake).
Will try again, but, with Jeff's video, I know what to do. It just has to be done without damaging the cover more than I already have.
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Jeff Liebermann wrote, on Fri, 20 Feb 2015 20:28:20 -0800:

Hi Jeff,
I solved it, sort of like how you did, thanks to your help and advice, and to the various suggestions in the videos (and to one innovation on my own that was shown nowhere else).
While, in the end, I learned how to do it in just five minutes, it took probably a dozen attempts overall to come up with the following strategy using the four hints below, one of which was never described anywhere as I came up with it on my own).
TRICK #1: Make a cover plate (as described in one video):
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7453/16410601090_8172e71525_c.jpg
TRICK #2: Make a female star tool (as described in another video):
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7292/16411791159_84b7dd9775_c.jpg
TRICK #3: Remove the circlip & pry up (not described in any video):
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7289/16597628155_942786b3ea_z.jpg
TRICK #4: Only use the cover plate for HALF the procedure!
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7282/15975460464_8dbabda7ea_z.jpg
After I built the tools for tricks #1 and 2, and after I came up with the unique procedure for trick #3, the final task, using trick #4 was trivially easy.
While coming up with the procedure took hours, if I were to do it again tomorrow, with these tricks and tools, it would take about five minutes, and probably work the very first time.
Thanks for all your help and advice. The video you provided kicked off all the good ideas.
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On Sat, 21 Feb 2015 05:03:48 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Congrats. It might be helpful if I explain how I found the videos and other relevant links. I did NOT use Google web search. I used Google image search. Something like this: <https://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=husqvarna+chain+brake+repair Use your imagination for the buzzwords, but what's important are the pictures. Select anything that looks useful and see what appears. Same with YouTube videos. <
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=husqvarna+chainsaw+brake+repair
Trying to do the same with a text search is much less useful.
Incidentally, I just blundered across this video on the 455 that claims there's a "special tool" for reinstalling the brake spring. I'll ask the local dealer or rep for the specifics. It's no in the catalog. <
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjaVFLII4DE

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Jeff Liebermann wrote, on Fri, 20 Feb 2015 21:45:30 -0800:

Hi Jeff,
Thanks. I understand your search mechanism, and I see how it would work.
I had searched google first and hadn't found the very nice videos you found, which gave me the ideas of the star socket and the temporary cover plate.
I came up with the idea of removing the circlip on my own, and you can see in some of the videos what people thought of the idea of using the needlenose pliers (fat chance).
With the combination of tricks, procedures, and special tools, the job is actually *easy*, although I did it at least a dozen times, because either the spring sprung out (most of the time) or I forgot to put the rubber post *under* the black plastic.
Most of the trouble was getting the spring in place, and keeping it there, which is why the tricks and tools were needed.
Thanks. I don't EVER want to do this again, but, if I do, I have the tools and procedures to make it easy. The real trick is to NEVER remove the clutch plate when the brake is on!
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Jeff Liebermann wrote, on Fri, 20 Feb 2015 21:45:30 -0800:

That found this video, which, I must say, is doing things the hard way:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PIDvWmJEo4

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On Sat, 21 Feb 2015 08:01:42 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Good find. I rather like the way he did it. However, he was lucky that the spring didn't fly off. Actually, I don't really like the screwdriver which might slip putting a hole in my other hand. I used pliers, which will make a smaller hole.
I also don't like your "easy way" of pushing the spring from the other end using the plastic parts. The spring could bend and break the projecting white prong thing as it is bent into position. While it takes more brute force to shove the spring in place as in the above video, there's less risk to breaking plastic parts.
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Jeff Liebermann wrote, on Sat, 21 Feb 2015 09:35:54 -0800:

Hi Jeff,
I don't disagree with you that there is a risk of breaking the nylon insert.
The biggest risk, I would think, is that you have to do the procedure about a dozen times before you realize the key elements to avoid, most of which revolve around the spring bouncing all over the garage.
That spring flew into the air at least a half-dozen times on me, and, I was amazed. You don't see it. You may hear it land, but each time it flew, there was absolutely no way I could *see* where it went.
I'm surprised the thing moves that fast.
Today I cut a trail about 500 feet down a mountain. I have another 2000 feet or so to go, and I'll have a dandy shortcut! Whew! Time to wash off that poison oak covering my body.
I have a secret formula: 1. I shower with Dawn detergent over every inch of my body (surfactant). 2. I splash a very dilute solution of bleach (to oxidize the alcohol/oil). 3. I soap down with Dawn (or Palmolive) again, to wash off the alcohol/oil.
Seems to work.
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On Sat, 21 Feb 2015 19:14:47 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

On later models, the nylon prong morphed into a metal equivalent: <http://s51.photobucket.com/user/mantidontowel/media/husqvarna/032408offhusqcorespondprocdureil-17.jpg.html My guess(tm) is that this would not happen unless there was a problem.

I was wondering why some of the videos showed little effort involved in retaining the spring after insertion, while others showed a major nightmare keeping the spring from flying away. Looking at a few videos, I found that all the springs had the ends filed flat as in: <http://s51.photobucket.com/user/mantidontowel/media/husqvarna/032408offhusqcorespondprocdureil-15.jpg.html (Sorry, that's best I could find). Theoretically, that provides even pressure to the case when the spring is inserted. However, the thin part of the ground down spring end provides much less pressure than the thicker part. The vertical part of the end of the slot in the orange case, is also not quite vertical to allow for mold release. That means that different orientations of the spring in the slot offer different side pressure, which is what causes the spring to buckle and fly away. With the heavy part of the ground down end on top, the spring is pushed down, which keeps it from being launched. With the heavy part of the ground down end at the bottom of the slot, the spring will buckle out of the slot, causing the spring launches which you experienced. However, if the end of the slot is radically off vertical, the spring will buckle and launch, no matter how the spring is rotated.
Insanity is doing the same thing over and over, and expecting different results. If it doesn't work, either try something different or stop to figure out why it's failing. Methinks "a dozen times" is too many.
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Jeff Liebermann wrote, on Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:06:40 -0800:

That's a nice find, Jeff, as I would have expected the nylon post to be too fragile also.

Yup. For example, when I tried the chain-brake-lever trick, my spring flew out from under the chain brake so fast I didn't even see where it went. Yet, in the video, the guy made it look so easy (although, it's a lot harder than he made it look to get the clutch plate on when the brake is set. It's like trying to get a car drum on when the drum brakes are in the set position.)

Yes. BOTH ends are filed flat on my spring also.

Very interesting (and astute) observation.

Sometimes my spring stayed in relatively well; other times it flew off.

Ah, but *each* of the dozen times was using a different set of tools and procedures. In the end, I think I came up with the *easiest* and safest way possible, which borrowed heavily from the video you found, but, which also added the unique element of "leveraging" the spring on from the closed end (everyone else "compressed" the spring from the open end).
I saw your post where you thought that might be dangerous, but, the spring isn't compressed any more in either method, so, I think it's OK, as long as there is a temporary cover plate.
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On Sun, 22 Feb 2015 18:37:04 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

In the distant past, I worked as a sewing machine "attachment maker" in my father's garment factory. Such spring related problems were part of the learning experience.

After a dozen attempts, with different tools and procedures, perhaps you might consider that something is wrong that does NOT involve the tool or procedure? Hint: That which is most obviously correct, beyond any need of checking, is usually the problem. In this case, it was the rotation of the spring, which is never mentioned in any of the videos or instructions.

It's possibly easier, but as I mentioned, carries the risk of breaking the plastic prong if the spring is excessively bent on insertion. There's quite a bit of force in the spring and only a little of that is required to break the plastic prong.

I don't have any problem exposing myself to danger. I'm considerably more hesitant to do the same to readers trying to follow my instructions. Think of it as litigation avoidance. Just pretend you're writing the repair instructions for the teenage daughter of a successful personal injury attorney.
The dangerous part is the requirement to hold the chain saw casing in an area where the tool might land if it slips. It's considered a good idea to think about where tools will land should they slip. I have a few knife cuts on my left hand to assist in remembering this principle. A vise won't work because it will tend to rotate as pressure is applied. A backstop to push against (such as the bench vise in one of the videos) is probably good enough, unless the casing decides to rotate and go sideways.
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Jeff Liebermann wrote, on Sun, 22 Feb 2015 10:57:15 -0800:

In hindsight, with a dozen of these attempts under my belt, my advice would be to never remove the clutch plate when the chainsaw brake is in the tightened position!
That's apparently the root of all the problems! (Inexperience.)
The second most important admonition is to NEVER REMOVE ANYTHING from the clutch plate! All of us made the mistake of removing the spring in our attempts to get it back in the locked position.
But, the trick is to MAKE THE SPECIAL SOCKET TOOL so that we can twist the star wheel back into the unlocked position, without removing anything!
With those two tricks (i.e., experience), the job is easy because the spring is never removed. The only step needed is the unlocking step.
Once the spring is actually removed, then TWO steps are required, namely the insertion of the spring, and then the unlocking of the spring.
In the insertion step, a vise is (almost certainly) mandatory, as is a temporary cover plate. Everyone but I compressed the spring from the open end, simply because that was the only accessible end.
I made the closed end accessible by removing the retaining ring, which allowed me to leverage the spring into place. Without a cover plate, this would never have worked, so, that's why the cover plate is mandatory if the spring is to be re-inserted.
Once the spring is inserted, then we're back to the trick of using the star-shaped socket.
In summary, these are what I would have HOPED someone would have told me, *before* I took the spring out in the first place! :)
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Jeff Liebermann wrote, on Sun, 22 Feb 2015 10:57:15 -0800:

:)
You really would like the inventors' lunch we go to in Palo Alto every Wednesday at noon ....
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On Sun, 22 Feb 2015 23:13:42 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

There are old inventors and bold inventors, but no old and bold inventors. The successful inventors don't have time to attend meetings. The losers talk about inventing things, but rarely go further. Those that boldly go further, get sued for infringement. I suspect that membership is therefore self-limiting to those that don't invent anything.
I've attended writers guild meetings, where everyone talks about writing, but nobody writes. I erratically attend ham radio meetings, where few of those attending know which end of the soldering iron to grab. I attended flying club meetings, where the main topic of discussion were administrative matters, and not flying. At least when I attend a concert, I can be certain that I'll hear some music. I can't imagine what I would do at an inventors lunch meeting? Invent something on the table cloth? If I'm expected to invent something during lunch, I would need access to my reference material so that I know what to steal.
The adage about the teenage daughter of the personal injury attorney was told to me many years ago by a successful attorney in a discussion on how to avoid ending up in court. So far, his advice has been quite useful and accurate.
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No. It's my variation of Finagle's 3rd Law. In any collection of data, the figure most obviously correct, beyond all need of checking, is the mistake.
There are also corollaries: - No person asked for assistance will see the mistake. - Everyone who drifts by with unsought advice will see it immediately.
to which I've added: - Nothing can be done to fix a problem until the blame is assigned. - The person who identifies the problem will be sentenced to overtime in order to fix the problem. - Never blame the person who is expected to fix the problem. Blaming the uninvolved, innocent, and those on vacation is usually best. - The application of an expensive, ugly, and marginal band aid to fix a problem is preferred over admitting that there is a problem. - Once the blame is assigned, this genie cannot be stuffed back into its bottle. - Blood, fire, and smoke are sure signs of a problem. - When deciding on an approach, the prime criteria for acceptance is determining which scheme will keep the phone from ringing. - If one person can do something in one hour, two people will take two hours, three people will take three hours, etc.
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Jeff Liebermann wrote, on Fri, 20 Feb 2015 20:28:20 -0800:

Hi Jeff,
With a two-foot long pipe wrench and a special tool that I made, rotating the chain lock turned out to be very easy!
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8565/15977856143_8e2d399445_c.jpg
The problem was that the spring sprung the moment I removed whatever it was that was holding down the spring!
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7339/16410601870_363e06db33_c.jpg
I lost the spring EVERY SINGLE TIME I removed the covering holding the spring down!
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7289/16571648146_b3f917358b_c.jpg
The trick was to use the cover plate for only HALF the procedure! Without the female socket I made, it wouldn't have worked.
But, once I realized how EASY it was to twist the chain lock with the tool I made, I then realized that the easiest solution was to put the black plastic holder back on first, and THEN twist the chain lock.
Voila!
The secret is having the right tools, and knowing the right sequence. For example, NOBODY came up with the idea of removing the circlip, which turns out to be the EASIEST way to get the spring into the first position.
I'll write up a textual HOWTO so others can benefit.
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Ralph Mowery wrote, on Thu, 19 Feb 2015 17:49:33 -0500:

This is most likely the shape of the tool used to spin the brake release wheel!
1.
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7439/16595963175_f4604227cf_b.jpg
2.
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7391/16594779561_196d987d3c_b.jpg
3.
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8677/16594779481_f7921a12ae_b.jpg
Those are screenshots from this video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=KfQDjDBdq0Y#t%5

What the guy did was sacrifice a hole saw, by notching it to fit the chain brake spoke wheel.
That seems to be the easiest method of all.
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Danny D. wrote, on Sat, 21 Feb 2015 00:39:04 +0000:

This is apparently the "official" method: http://blog.vminnovations.com/how-to-reset-husqvarna-chain-brake-fix-stuck-or-locked-brake-problem/
It seems so easy in that video.
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Danny D. wrote, on Thu, 19 Feb 2015 02:52:28 +0000:

Here's the 5-minute sequence, in a nutshell, once you know how to do it! - Remove the star-wheel circlip & position the spring in the slot. - Screw the temporary cover plate on (which holds the spring down). - Leverage the spring into position #1 (bent) with an 18-inch screwdriver. - Replace the circlip. - Remove the temporary cover plate (hold the spring down with your hands). - Replace the permanent plastic cover plates (watch the rubber post!). - Spin the star wheel into position #2 (straight) using a special socket. - Voila!
Here's a more detailed pictorial DIY. It's easy, once you know these tricks and make the special tools!
1. Fabricate a female socket for the chainlock star wheel:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7395/16411792279_46ddab4f57_c.jpg
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7397/16410603900_02b4cddeca_c.jpg
Note: Forget about standard drum brake tools; they don't fit:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7339/16410598970_33a26618e9_c.jpg
2. Fabricate a hold-down plate for 1/2 the spring tensioning:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7453/16410601090_8172e71525_c.jpg
3. Lock the magnesium clutch plate upright in a vise and remove the circlip and pry up with an 18-inch screwdriver:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8571/16411787569_765c0f3a41_z.jpg
4. Replace the circlip once you have the spring in the 1st position:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7290/15977854503_6993ccff87_z.jpg
5. REMOVE THE TEMPORARY COVER PLATE! You can finish the job without removing the plate, but you'll lose the spring a half dozen times before you realize the folly of trying to get the spring into the second position with the cover plate on! If you're VERY LUCKY, you can get the cover plate off with the spring in the straight (second) position, but you MUST be very lucky for it to stay in place:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8579/16596438151_34b09b602e_z.jpg
6. Instead, remove the cover plate while the spring is in the first position and replace the black original plastic cover:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7351/16410598560_de1ffccf41_c.jpg
NOTE: You can do this ONLY if you've made the special socket tool described in step #1.
7. With an 18-inch pipe wrench, spin the chainlock into the second (straight) position using the special socket tool you made in step #1:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7282/15975460464_8dbabda7ea_z.jpg
8. Do not make the mistake I made, which is to forget to put the rubber protection strip on the post UNDER the black plastic!
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8580/15977853143_10b400741f_z.jpg
I had it all done, and had to do it over again because of that simple faux pas (you can see the rubber endcap in the middle of this picture above; it's supposed to be inserted under and through the black plastic, so it has to go on 1st!).
In summary, the tricks that make this task easy are:
A. The socket tool allows you to spin the spring into the second (straight) position while the black plastic is on. This is immensely helpful because there is no danger of the spring springing out when you try to move from the temporary cover plate to the black plastic (ask me how I know this).
B. The cover plate is still useful, in the first stage of spring compression, as it keeps both the spring in place, and it keeps the circular friction clutch in position. With tape and wire, the friction clutch moves out of position and is impossible to get back in place due to the enormous tension so you have to start all over again (ask me how I know).
C. The cover plate is a hindrence for the second step, that of straightening the mechanism, becuase that adds tremendous additional tension, which springs the spring when you remove the cover plate. So, best to NEVER remove it, by replacing it with the permanent black plastic (ask me how I know).
D. The unique trick of removing the circlip makes pushing the spring into the first position IMMENSELY EASY! There is no easier way to get the spring into that first position (ask me how I know). In all the videos, they left the circlip in place, and tried to compress the spring from the other end, but, it turns out to be easiest to PUSH on the spring from the attached end. Putting the circlip back on is easy, so the only danger is to be careful not to bend the brass pin and not to lose the circlip retaining ring.
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