anyone ever drill out a lock?

I repair office machines and one of my customers has a rolling cart they lost the key for, and they now want use the stuff in that cabinet.....
I tried getting keys from the cabinet supplier but they didnt work...
has anyone ever drilled out a lock?
I would rather avoid damaging the cabinet much. and other than flip or flop have never seen anyone drill out a lock. on flip or flop they just start drilling, but never show what happens.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bob haller wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Like most people who ask for help here, I think he doesn't want to pay $100 for something that, with a little advice, he can do in 5 minutes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, May 1, 2015 at 7:29:44 PM UTC-5, bob haller wrote:

drilling, but never show what happens.
Those are easy to pick, usually disc tumblers...bend a paper clip to have a bump on the end of the wire Like a small V about 1/16" high...hold a turn ing pressure on the barrel (preferably in the direction it opens), go back and forth across the tumblers (rake). They will get hug-up one by one until it opens.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 1 May 2015 17:52:59 -0700 (PDT), bob_villa

Exactly
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/1/2015 8:52 PM, bob_villa wrote:

All kinds of instructions and utube videos on lock picking.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bob_villa posted for all of us...

+1 Done it.
--
Tekkie *Please post a follow-up*

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/1/2015 8:29 PM, bob haller wrote:

I can't speak for a rolling cart but I have drilled out a few file cabinet locks because of lost keys. I start with small bits into the center of the core and increase bit sizes until it reaches the tumblers then pow, the cylinder pops out. In many cases the lock assembly can be replaced but the office personnel doesn't care and just leaves it that way.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/1/2015 8:29 PM, bob haller wrote:

I've been a locksmith since 1986 or so.
The cabinet probably has a very simple lock. If you can load the cabinet in a vehicle, call the locksmiths near you, see if one will let you bring it in. Save yourself a trip charge. Should be able to make new keys easy enough. Or, I can come out. Dollar fifty a mile (one way from Buffalo, NY). Probably half hour labor to make new keys.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2015-05-01 6:29 PM, bob haller wrote:

I use a 1/4" bit in my 18V Milwaukee, drill straight and it pops the latch off the back. Replace with new lock.
--
Dr. WTF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
i once owned 3 chevy citations. it was a pia carrying so many keys. One day I met a locksmith who re keyed all the vehicles the same.
i really liked chevy citations
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I had a 66 Chevelle and my key fit my dad's 65 Impala but his key wouldn't fit mine. Back in the olden days if there were 10 guys in a bar with a GM, you had a chance one of them had a key that would start your car. They all used the same blank and there were not that many different keys, along with a pretty crude wafer lock. A worn key was better than a new one for starting someone else's car. Wiggle the key a little while trying to turn it and you could tease all the wafers into lining up.
About the time they started putting the key on the steering post, they used more styles of blanks and they increased the number of key patterns they cut. Now a "chipped" key is pretty much standard.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

During those years I think there were only a few key choices in most brands. In high school 3 friends each had a ford of the same year. The keys were not a total match, but one key would start two of the cars and the door key would not fit, but if moved to the other car, it would open that door. I had a Chevy key that fit a Tempest of a friend.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, May 2, 2015 at 10:40:33 PM UTC-5, bob haller wrote:

I had the '80 V-6...died at 60K (oil pump broke, #2 crank journal seized). GM played the violin as I cried...you must have had the "iron duke" 4-cyl?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, May 3, 2015 at 8:33:57 AM UTC-4, bob_villa wrote:

?
the garage i always went to, the mechanic did some work on the carb. I pull ed out into heavy traffic and found the throttle stuck. by the time I got t he engine stopped it had self destructed.....
the garage said they would pay for a used engine and install it for free
so i offered to pay the difference between the used engine, and a new GM en gine in a crate. it cost 1500 bucks, but i forget what GM called them:( thi nk i paid 700 bucks. the garage found the crate engine took a lot more labo r, bolting on all the accesories and perhaps the head?
it all worked out I was that pro cares top customer $ wise.
that citation was a v6, my 4 cyclinder engine got a head gasket leak at jus t over 100,000 miles, and after repairs it went to near 170,000 miles.
i replaced citations with dodge caravans,, my one went 450,000 miles...
it was like a family member died when it was towed away:(
at one time i was driving 45K miles a year, fixing office machines
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, May 3, 2015 at 7:46:23 AM UTC-5, bob haller wrote:
You know how you always hear: "it seized-up" or "it threw a rod"? I rebuilt mine...this is what happened, the undriven gear's pin in the oil pump move d out of the pump casing and was hit by the crank...breaking the pump case. Zero oil pressure, zero outside temp...and a female driving...the rest is history!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/3/2015 8:33 AM, bob_villa wrote:

Exactly why I no longer own a GM automobile. Screw them. Last warranty issue they offered me $500 off on a new car but would not fix mine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/1/2015 8:29 PM, bob haller wrote:

Yes, I've drilled out scores of them. I had a sideline business repairing arcade games, pinball machines and such. One problem was that the workers were continually losing keys. Typical 'flat-key' locks take about a 1/4" or 3/8" standard bit and a few minutes. 'Cylinder-key' locks take a bit longer since you need to center-punch first.
The really buggers are locks such as those made by Medeco and used on change machines and high-value vending machines. _Those_ require a bit of initial drilling to get a start and then, of all things, a carbide masonry bit (at least that is the best I ever found). Those lock bodies have hardened steel rods buried in them which catch the drill bit so a heavy corded drill and a lot of caution to avoid a broken wrist. With those I sometimes expended two or three cheap bits because of dulling and breakage.
Your typical cheap cylinder cabinet lock should be gone in a couple of minutes with a combination of drill and screwdriver.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/3/2015 3:03 PM, BenignBodger wrote:

Petty thieves every where thank you for the OJT.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.