Any way to test a deep well pump?

We woke up this morning with no water. My husband thinks it's the submersible pump, but he had a heckuva time getting the pump in, and he'd rather have a better idea of whether or not it's working before he goes to the trouble of pulling it.
We have a 200' deep well, the pump is about 170' down. We think it's a Gould pump, but we're not sure. The pump was used when we got it, and we installed it in the well five years ago. The only problem we've had since then was this past June, when we had to replace the control box after a violent lightning storm. Otherwise, all has been working fine.
When we turn on the circuit breaker for the deep well pump, we can hear a surging from the control box -- like a hum -- and then it stops, and then it hums again in sort of a 3-seconds on, 3-seconds off pattern. There is definitely water in the well, but when we removed the well cap, we couldn't hear the pump in the well, though we're not sure whether we should be able to through the water (there is probably 70' of water above the pump). My husband replaced the control box with a brand new one, to no avail.
He has since hooked up a shallow well pump to a barrel in the basement, going into the same line right before the pressure tank, and all is working well, so presumably it's not the pressure tank.
Does anyone have any ideas of things we haven't thought of before we pull the pump? Or is there any way to test the pump before pulling it?
Thanks for any ideas.
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Sorry -- just wanted to add that we're also wondering whether the electrical line might have broken somewhere. Is there any way to tell if the pump is getting juice?
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what's the voltage to the pump? is the breaker a single or a double? 1 way to verify the pump is getting juice is to buy a basic clamp on meter, and somewhere where the wires are seperated (like in breaker panel) clamp around 1 of the hots and turn on pump. did you check the contacts on the control sw.?
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It's a 220. I'm not sure whether he checked the contacts on the control switch.
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Take the cover off the pressure switch and see if the points arc when it switches on and off. If so the pump is getting power.
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After checking the incoming power to the controller.
An simple test would be use and ohm meter and check continuity with the power off. Hot to hot should read almost zero and hot to ground should read infinity (no connection/relationship). If there is an reading on the hot to ground, plan on pulling the pump. An better test would be to megger the motor, special tester and you do not want to buy one for just this.
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Take a good look at the start capacitor for damage due to over heating, or simply replace it--probly about a 50/50 chance thats where the problem is.
You can ohm the leads going down to the pump, no shorts to ground are allowed and Im recalling the readings should be all be fairly low, someplace around 10 ~ 20 ohms lead / lead--anyone feel free to correct me if Im wrong with these readings.
--

SVL



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Hmmmm -- isn't the capacitor in the the control box, though? We did try a brand new control box, and it didn't help.

Thanks.
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I hadnt noticed you mentioning that detail before--but yes, its in the controller box.
--

SVL





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The wires that enter the well casing are usually in a plastic conduit. See if you can pry away the fitting on that conduit to gain access to the wires. Then take a common meter and puncture the wire insulation and see if you have voltage. Put a little silicone on the puncture spots and tape them when you finish. If you have power, the pump is bad, or a wire is broken down in the well casing. If not, start at the power source and find out what is wrong. The capacitor is very often at fault. Replace it. Of course before doing any of thisbe sure you got power at the breaker, the control box, and pressure switch. You can jump the terminals on a pressure switch to test.

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Thanks so much for all of the replies and help. My husband pulled the pump today and discovered that the wire had worn through about three feet above the pump, apparently from hitting the well casing when the pump kicks on (he has since put arrestors on). It's a Burks pump, by the way, not a Gould. I'm including that info so that the next time we have pump trouble I can look it up!
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