Any way to speed up drying for Tractor Spray Paint

Farm supply stores sell spray cans of Tractor paint. It matches the tractor brand, such as John Deere green, International Harvester red, Allis Chalmers orange, etc. This paint generally provides a good coating and holds up well in the weather, but it takes days to dry. Unlike general purpose spray paint, which is usually dry in an hour, and smells like a laquer based paint, this tractor paint is more like an oil based enamel.
On a real hot summer day, with the sun beating on the paint, it will dry (to touch) in around 24 hours. But if the weather is cool and no sun, it can take 3 days or more to dry so it can be handled.
Our weather is currently cool. I painted a few small tractor parts outdoors, then brought them in the house to dry. Two days later, they are still tacky to touch, and it's 68 deg. in the house. It almost seems like they require direct sunshine to dry.
But until the weather warms up, I cant do much of anything, and thus can not install these parts on my tractor. So far, my only thought is to put a heat lamp above these parts.
Any other ideas to speed up the drying time?
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Are you spooning it on? I have never encountered any paint that is still tacky after two days. Oil paint can take a week or more to fully cure but is is generally tack free after no more than eight hours, usually less.
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On Saturday, April 30, 2016 at 4:22:13 PM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

+1
Sounds weird to me too. But if the parts will fit in his oven, he could put them in there on low heat, maybe with the door open, etc. My oven I can do 170 and I think that would be OK. He should probably try some similar unpainted parts first just to gauge how hot it gets.
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On 04/30/2016 02:11 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

I bake small metal parts in an oven at 200 F or so. Keep in mind there is a risk of explosion with some paints.
To reduce the risk of explosion, I heat the oven to 200, shut it off and then insert the parts to be baked.
Season parts to taste before serving.
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On Sat, 30 Apr 2016 15:28:43 -0600, GOWGN

I was using disposable broiler trays to broil food, and I found that the really cheap ones leak if you look at them the wrong way. The ones one level more expensive can leak too if you stab them with the fork while spearing the food. So I ended up with a puddle of grease in the bottom of the electric oven. Hard to clean up because the lower heating element is in the way. Then I needed to roast something, and I wondered if heating the bottom element, just an inch above the grease, would set it on fire. I kept nearby watching much of the time and it didn't, but I cleaned it up soon after. I wonder if there is a difference in volatility and ignition temperature among chicken grease, beef grease, lamb grease, etc.
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