Any way to secure tiny screw on reading glasses?

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Lots being less than 5%.
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AZ Nomad wrote: ...

Think you left the trailing zero off that estimate... :)
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I have a soldering iron (if it still works). I can certainly give that a try.
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Square Peg wrote: ...

Probably won't work well on the shiny metal...
The Loctite or peening/spreading/thread-galling suggestions are good.
I've found the nail polish/paint/primer route to (usually) be enough, too.
The only different suggestion I've not seen that has worked on occasion is a drop of epoxy in a pinch works like Loctite as well...
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Square Peg wrote:

Hi, Dap of Krazy glue won't do?
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Is Krazy glue different from superglue?
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No. It is worthless brittle tempermental stuff. On a screw, you could count on the micron roughness on the metalic surfaces to be more than it can bridge. Gorilla glue might work, but locktight is designed for exactly this application.
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AZ Nomad wrote:

yup, Loctite's been doing this kinda job for sixty years or so?
see: http://www.loctiteproducts.com/products/detail.asp?catid &subidH&plidi5
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I would use the blue locktite.It's like a semi permanent bond. Tony
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I think Krazy and Super are both same. Cyanoacrillate.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Both are CA based, true, but they are low grade CA products that don't work nearly as well as what you will find at a hobby shop that caters to model airplanes. Brands such as ZAP, Mercury, Balsa USA, Handibond and Bob Smith are far and away superior products that actually perform the intended functions.
CA will not reliably bond metal to metal, but does work fairly well in the thread-locker function. The "thin" formula is dribbly, but wicks into the threads while thicker formulas like "Krazy glue" just sit on the surface and crack off as soon as you touch them.
Krazy glue doesn't even stick your skin together all that much... Try some REAL CA sometime.
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Square Peg wrote:

Careful use of an automatic center punch could stake the ends of the screws as they come out of the nuts expanding them enough to keep them tight. You may be able to find a small automatic center punch at your local Lowe's Depot store. After you obtain one, you may ask yourself "Why did I never get one of these incredibly useful gadgets before now?" I have several different sizes of the things.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_center_punch
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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On Wed, 27 Aug 2008 01:18:49 -0500, Uncle Monster

Wow. I never heard of these things. I'll get one and give it a try.
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This tool is usually in a car thief's toolbox. A quick almost silent way to shatter a side window of a prospective car. Also something you don't want a cop to see you have. Many cops think tools like this are only used by car thieves.
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On Wed, 27 Aug 2008 14:44:26 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

You can get arrested (or hassled) for just having such a tool? Being right next to a slim jim and a crow bar probably wouldn't help, then?
I didn't plan to keep it in the car (except on the way home from the hardware store) or on my person (except when actually shattering the lenses in my glasses). I guess I could always show the cop my repaired (or shattered) glasses! ;-)
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

I keep the small one in my work shirt pocket next to the little screwdrivers, markers, thermometer, ball point pen, etc. I had a service call at The U.S. Attorney's office in downtown a while back and had to explain to the security guards that I had all manner of sharp metallic objects on my person and in my tool case. It was no problem because I was there to make legal use of all my sharp implements, including my rather small brain. *snicker*
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On Wed, 27 Aug 2008 14:36:29 -0500, Uncle Monster

Your brain is small, but very sharp?
Are you allowed on airplanes with it, or do they make you check it? That would actually be an advantage as you would not be nearly as likely to be annoyed by being charged for a pillow or a trip to the can.
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They don't search invited contractors? Neat. I wondered, I can just imagine myself getting a call to govt office, and having to explain that I can't do the job bare handed.
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On Wed, 27 Aug 2008 01:18:49 -0500, Uncle Monster

Amazon has several others:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)19872873&sr=8-3
(Amazon.com product link shortened)19872873&sr=8-1
(Amazon.com product link shortened)19873150&sr=8-4
Are they all pretty much the same?
Do I need a small one and a larger one? As long as I am justifying tools to the bean counter...
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Square Peg wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)19872873&sr=8-3
(Amazon.com product link shortened)19872873&sr=8-1
(Amazon.com product link shortened)19873150&sr=8-4
Those are all the mid sized tools. I have that size, bigger and smaller. The small pocket sized punch is probably more what you would use on tiny screws. I just used mine on some #4 machine screws to stake them.
http://www.generaltools.com/Products/Pocket-Automatic-Center-Punch__87.aspx
You can grind or file the point to make it sharper for fine work. I use my punches as screw starters in wood too. When I hang a shelf or piece of equipment on a backboard and want it to be straight and level, I mark the mounting points then use the punch to make a hole in the center of my pencil mark so the screw doesn't wander off to points unknown.
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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