any way to effectively rid Gorilla tape odor?

Had a project to do recently and decided to use Gorilla tape as duct tape just wouldn't have been strong enough. I am left with a problem however: odor! The smell from the tape is bad enough that it has triggered my sinuses and my eyes are irritated at times. Unfortunately, the project is too detailed to have to start over again. Is there any way to stop the odor from this tape and leave the tape intact?
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Bill Cheeseman;3041269 Wrote: > Had a project to do recently and decided to use Gorilla tape as duct

>

It's probably because the backing of the Gorilla tape is porous and the solvents from the glue are evaporating through the back of the tape.
About the only thing I can think of are either improved ventillation or to cover your Gorilla tape with packaging tape (which does have an impermeable plastic backing:
[image:
http://www.bswtape.com.cn/upload/Cn_Product/2009121115514792756.jpg ]
--
nestork


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On 04/04/2013 11:26 AM, nestork wrote:

Thanks for the info. Unfortunately, the way the project was completed, it is nearly impossible to go back and cover up the Gorilla tape. Well, at least not easily possible as the entire item would have to be disassembled first. One thing I'm wondering about and maybe you can answer is, will this smell decay over time? I just applied the tape yesterday so it's fresh, but on the other hand if it's going to take weeks or months, then I'll go with your suggestion. One other alternative I was thinking about that would not require disassembly: do you think I could spray the areas with the spray version of liquid electrical tape? It would leave the rubberized coating wherever I sprayed it and it would be easier to apply than packing tape.
Bill
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I'll give the right answer, but you got to show a picture of what your doing. I hope its not bondage. !!
Greg
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em

tely,

any

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r

d, it is nearly

not easily possible

m

her

t

pray

ting

.

What about spraying with polyurethane??
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On 04/04/2013 11:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

I looked for spray paint poly yesterday, but couldn't find it. That was my first thought though. I did pick up some others as I mentioned in my other response, so hopefully one of those will do the trick.
Bill
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Bill Cheeseman;3041753 Wrote: >

>

>

Bill: An alkyd based polyurethane will only make the film slightly more impermeable than a normal alkyd spray paint. All you need is a normal oil based spray paint.
I've never used either of the two products you bought, BUT...
"Breathing" is the ability of any coating to allow individual H2O molecules to pass through it, but not liquid water.
The reason why acrylic paints (like latex paints) are said to "breathe" is because the resins they're made of consist of long molecules scrunched up into small balls. Imagine scrunching a long copper wire into a small ball. No matter how tightly you squeezed it, there would be tiny gaps between the individual wire loops that would allow a fine enough powder to pass through the wire ball. It is these gaps that H2O molecules pass through in order for latex paints to "breathe". Since those tiny gaps are smaller than the distance between H2O molecules in liquid water, individual H2O molecules can pass quite easily through a film of latex paint, but not liquid water.
Anyhow, the molecules cause the smell would be much larger than H2O molecules and might not be able to pass through the Krylon acrylic film, but an alkyd paint is impermeable enough to even to allow individual H2O molecules to pass through it.
So, if it wuz me, I would just use an ordinary spray paint.
I don't know if the rubberized sealant will work or not, but I'm confident that any alkyd spray paint will work. And, getting an alkyd based polyurethane is not going to make the film appreciably more impermeable. The only difference between alkyd resins and "polyurethane" resins is that the polyurethane resins have a chemical called an "isocyanate" added to them. This isocyanate reacts with glycerine molecules in the alkyd resin to create urethane linkages inside the alkyd resin. Those urethane linkages work very much like the roll cage in a race car, making the resin harder if you tried to squeeze one and stronger if you tried to stretch one. This is why alkyd based polyurethanes form harder and stronger films than normal alkyd paints.
But, the impermeability of the film they form won't be appreciably different. Both will be impermeable enough to prevent even individual H2O molecules from passing through them, so why hold off on buying a poly when any alkyd spray paint will work fine?
--
nestork


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On 04/05/2013 12:37 PM, nestork wrote:

Ok, I painted with the clear coating spray paint this afternoon:
Krylon Crystal Clear spray paint @ http://goo.gl/OdAOB
I decided to apply two coats and then let it dry outdoors for a couple of hours before bringing it in. Tonight I have it in the room where it will hopefully remain permanently. I still let the room air out for several hours with the windows and ceiling fan. It still gets cold here at night, so I just closed up a while ago. Bottom line is that I think you were right as the smell is much reduced. I'd almost say eliminated, but I still smell traces when closer to the object, although this may be the paint still curing (I'm not sure how long it takes spray paint to cure but I thought the can said something about 24 hours for a complete curing/ drying although I was moving the object indoors after two hours).
However, it appears that 6 feet away, the smell is no longer an issue and I'm sure less odor will occur over time. The night before last, the odor from the tape was too great to even stay in any part of the room for too long. Thanks for the help!
I also contacted the maker of Gorilla glues and tapes about the smell and they told me that it should disperse in a couple of days on it's own. They suspected that either a well sealed or brand new roll was purchased ("brand new" in this case meaning it didn't have a very long shelf life in the store) and glue odors were still being produced. Although this tape is now covered with the paint, I still have some of the original roll remaining. I may place it somewhere in the house just to see if the smell will disperse on its own. They were very courteous in their reply which is something I don't always encounter these days.
Bill
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I didn't notice any particular odor with gorilla. I'll give a better sniff. I usually speed dry crystal clear enamel with hair drier unless I want more shine. Should be odor free soon. Any heating will force odor out unless it's fully cured which could take days. I started using krylon over 30 years ago setting labeling on equipment panels.
Greg
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Gosh, Greg, what's wrong with your nose? I opened my Gorilla tape & nearly passed out! I will never use it in the house & will store it in the garage -- it smells SO nasty!!
Pam
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On 11/17/2013 11:23 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

An idiot twofer. Not only a response to an antique thread, but no context to figure out what it is about.
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On 4/5/2013 3:24 AM, Bill Cheeseman wrote:

krylon has spray lacquer in a rattle can.
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Bill Cheeseman;3041528 Wrote: >

> disassembly: do you think I could spray the areas with the spray > version of liquid electrical tape? It would leave the rubberized > coating wherever I sprayed it and it would be easier to apply than > packing tape.

I've never even heard of a spray version of electrical tape.
But, I'm thinking spray paint is an alkyd paint and SHOULD form an impermeable film over the Gorilla tape, and that's all you need to stop the smell; an impermeable film. (see PS below)
Even painting boiled linseed oil (if you can't buy an alkyd paint or primer anymore where you live) over that gorilla tape with a 3 inch wide paint roller should knock the smell down substantially too.
But, maybe give it a day or two for the smell to dissipate on it's own. It might still do that.
PS: When there's a fire in a house and the house still has that "burnt" smell in it even after all the burnt materials have been removed, it's because the compounds causing the smell have permeated into the porous latex paint on the walls and ceilings. To eliminate the smell, restoration companies will often repaint the interior walls and ceilings of the house with a product called "KILZ" sealer:
[image:
http://www.thepaintstore.com/v/vspfiles/photos/10004-2T.jpg ]
Ditto if someone buys a house that a heavy smoker used to live in. The new owners will often paint the walls and ceilings with KILZ sealer before repainting over the sealer with a new colour paint to get rid of the "cigarette smoke smell".
And, I have absolutely no clue why people use KILZ sealer for this instead of any ordinary alkyd primer or paint. People who don't know much about paint presume that KILZ is different than other alkyd primers or paints because KILZ dries much more quickly than a regular alkyd primer or paint. But, if you look at the MSDS for KILZ, you find that it's an ordinary alkyd primer, and the only reason why it dries fast is because instead of using just mineral spirits as a thinner, it uses a mixture of 60 percent mineral spirits and 40 percent naptha. Naptha is camping fuel, and it evaporates much faster than mineral spirits. So, when you paint with KILZ, what evaporates from the wet KILZ film is different, but what drys up on the wall and remains there is exactly the same as if you'd use any ordinary alkyd primer.
And, it's not that primers seal smells in better than paints, it's that alkyds crosslink much more densely than drying oils like linseed oil or Tung Oil, and it's that crosslinking that makes for a more impermeable film than you can get with a drying oil.
So, if a spray paint works for you, then you can use any spray paint, not just KILZ to seal in the smell of that glue solvent. I don't think they make water based spray paints, so any spray paint you buy should be an alkyd paint thinned with alcohol (or naptha or acetone) so it dries really fast. (It doesn't matter what the thinner they use is cuz ALL of the thinner will evaporate from the paint film as it dries.)
--
nestork


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On 04/05/2013 02:33 AM, nestork wrote:

Here are the two spray paints I picked up yesterday:
Krylon Crystal Clear spray paint:
http://goo.gl/OdAOB
Rust-Oleum LeakSeal Flexible Rubber Coating:
http://goo.gl/D6zDu
Hopefully, one of these will work. I'm leaning toward the second (rubber coating) but may be overkill and the clear acrylic will do the job.
I appreciate your contribution to this thread. Thanks a lot.
Bill
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On 4/4/2013 11:33 PM, nestork wrote:

there are different kilz products. the one kilz is recommended for contains shellac, and is used to hide water stains and such, because it will stick to most anything, and most anything painted over it will stick to that kilz product.
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Bill: Hope it works out. If it doesn't, keep in mind that you can always paint over that acrylic clear coat with an oil based spray paint, thereby establishing a truly impermeable film over everything.
Chaniarts: You said: 'chaniarts[_3_ Wrote:

I think you're mixing up two different primer/stain killers made by two different companies.
KILZ or, as it's called nowadays, "KILZ Original" is made by MasterChem Industries, and it contains lotsa naptha, but no shellac at all.
BIN, is made by Zinssers and is a shellac based primer/stain killer. Zinssers calls it a "white pigmented shellac" which is just their way of saying "it's a shellac, but it's white in colour cuz we put lots of white pigments into it".
When a stain "bleeds through" a paint or primer, what's actually happening is that something in the stain is dissolving in the mineral spirits or water the primer or paint is thinned with, and then diffusing through the wet primer or paint film to discolour the surface of the film. When that film dries, the surface will remain discoloured, and that discolouration is called "bleed through".
So, the whole trick to preventing bleed through is to use a primer or paint who's thinner won't dissolve the stain. In 99% of cases, if the stain dissolves in the water of a latex primer, it won't dissolve in the mineral spirits thinner of an alkyd primer or paint, and if it dissolves in mineral spirits, it won't dissolve in the water of a latex primer or paint.
The reason why shellac makes a good stain killer is because:
a) you're correct that it'll stick to just about anything short of a raw egg yolk. b) not nearly as many common household wall or ceiling stains are as soluble in alcohol as are soluble in mineral spirits or water, and c) since dry shellac is only dissolved by alcohol, you can paint over the dried shellac stain killer with EITHER oil based or latex paint without fear that the paint thinner will dissolve the shellac and allow the stain to bleed through again. That is, you're confident that the shellac will "encapsulate" the stain.
So, while they're both good products, BIN is the one with the shellac in it.
--
nestork

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