Any tricks for getting "contractor" discount on supplies

Page 3 of 4  

wrote:

Huh? A customer doesn't need to know that this guy just got his license, is going to use illegal alien subs with no industrial insurance, and has underbid the next contractor by $235,000 to build your house.
Customers like that deserve (like you) to get whatever befalls them and their "best price" mentality.
Steve
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ummm...that's sort of his point....

Who's talking about over-charging? Were talking about customers who complain about legitimate prices.

Something wrong with getting rich by choosing to step away from the comfortable, secure, cheque-for-life union job, and putting your home and family life in a precarious position in order to take a chance for a better life?

Word-of-mouth is great, but even established companies like McDonalds, Home Depot, Wal Mart, etc...still advertise. Think maybe they know something about marketing??

I care! Please post pictures of the one you're plonking!
--
Respectfully, Bob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob_Loblaw wrote:

The salesman for a a local radio station was making a call on a hardware store owner. The owner said he had been in the same place for fifteen years and he didn't think he needed to advertise. The Salesman asked him if the church at the end of the block was there when he opened the church being over two hundred years old. The owner said of course it was. Salesman asked why do you suppose they still ring their bell every Sunday. -- Tom Horne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Marketing can be over rated. I think I would still go to McDonalds if they did NO advertising.
It all depends on your market niche. I was a steel erection contractor. I had the smallest yellow page ad you could get. I was AAA Welding, but they still messed up the alphabet and put me farther back in the listings rather at the first a few times over the years.
I targeted the businesses I wanted to have as customers. I realized the size I wanted to grow to. I achieved that, and upon selling the business had 275 apartment projects and companies as steady clients. I can remember getting only one good contact from the yellow pages, that one being U-Haul that I went on to do all their carport repair work for.
Most people who called me from the yellow pages were tirekickers, and homeowners who cried when I told them how much I wanted to send a truck, two experienced men and $25,000 worth of equipment to their house for a couple of hours to fix their problems. And their conversation usually started with, "I need you to come finish a job that some unlicensed person flaked out on."
Referrals were the best. Good customers referring other good customers. And managers that transferred from property to property, and called me from each.
I did a good job. I was on time. I didn't overcharge. I guaranteed my work 100%, and if there was a problem, it was put to the top of the list, and I didn't tell people they had to wait a week.
The last year in business myself and one helper had a gross intake of $334k. The man who bought the business went out into all directions of modifications and new services and new things, bigger building, new car for wifey, new trucks, and lasted three years before going bankrupt. He drove a new truck every year, and advertised on TV, something I never considered.
Marketing is a great thing if you're selling advertising.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Different goals. Mcdonalds is prepared to grow infinately. Many contractors are perfectly happy with a 3-year backlog of jobs for them and whatever size crew they're comfortable managing. Not everyone wants to be multinational.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Goedjn, McDonalds' 2006 4th Quarter Report showed a 22% Net Profit **AFTER TAXES** on 5.6 BILLION dollars sales for 3 months. What contractor of any size does 22% net profit? No, better yet who in the fuck does 22% net profit **AFTER TAXES**?
See it for yourself at: http://moneycentral.msn.com/investor/invsub/results/statemnt.aspx?symbol=MCD&stmtView=Qtr
Jabs

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You make a good point. It is the business of the contractor and no one here should ever want to better understand what they are paying for and why they are paying. We should never question authority or contractors. We should never try to gain knowledge. I also thing we should take some of the TV shows off the air that tell us how to do things on our own. Education is evil.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yep, I agree that the costs of running a professional business are very high. That factor along with the fact that the field has an ample percentage of conmen and hacks has given rise to the DIY option.
New online HVAC sites are popping up left and right. Some even promote a co-op arrangement where the homeowner does the rough in and they find you a tech. for final connections/checkout. (just like buying your tires at Tire Rack and taking them to the shop for installation and in the process save a bundle).
R410A is making this easier by not requiring EPA licenses. (yes venting is still illegal but most systems come precharged). New refrigerant developments with no ODP and no greenhouse gas effect could really accelerate this shift.
When you can buy and install the components for $2500 that a contractor normally charges over $10,000 for then the economics will shift an increasing portion of HVAC to DIY. (Throw in $1000 for misc. tools and supplies and it's still a huge savings).
The next phase will be when a manufacturer steps up and offers simple lineset connections and strikes a deal with Home Depot and Lowes. (ie precharged/no brazing needed)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yer an idiot. Conmen and hacks are in every profession. You havent checked out fully how the co-op arrangement works. The online co. sells you equipment and "tells" you they will help you contact a company to help install it or just start it up for you. What they dont tell you is that all they do is send out letters asking companies like mine if I would call you and give you a free estimate for your little furnace party. I havent found a company yet that will work for labor only. The only ones that will are the ones you dont want in your home. Otherwise, I charge you for the estimate, I figure in my labor I add in the equipment profit just as if Id bought it and I give you one price. Once its finished you have no warranty because I dont provide it if I dont purchase the equipment and the Goodman equipment you bought has no warranty if purchased over the internet. Its listed right on their website. Pre-charged lines sets have already been thought up. Most of them disappeared. They leak at the connections. Thats why we braze shit. Hope you have/had fun with your project. Bubba
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In this thread contrractors do indeed need to make a living and what they charge is the going rate. As a consumer I try to do as much as I can as my income was always modest and every dollar counts. This NG is an excellent forum to discuss and to evaluate if I can do the job myself. The only subject I won't DIY is gas installations. But anything that doesn't require fiddling with the gas supply and connections itself is easy enough to do.
The argument here is its a natural conflict between the consumer and the contractor that each needs to get the best bang for his buck. As manufacturers improve their products for DIY consumers (1) contractors will have to raise their prices for what work there remains. No one should get hot under the collar when a contractor quotes a price way out of what the consumer thinks it is worth. The alternative is learn to do it yourself or get a friend to help out. If its something that you cannot do, for example pour concrete, then you have to pay the going rate.
(1) A excellent example of changing economics is computers and their peripherals which are fairly big ticket items. But who repairs them any more? Just a very few such business are left and their bread and butter is mostly board and parts swapping for which they have to charge rates that often make it worthwhile to just buy a new and better unit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

AH HAH! There it is. The answer to your question! You suppose you had a hard time getting someone because you already knew how to do it better?

Is this a new home in a subdivsion? A tract home perhaps? Sorry your posts were too long winded. It was obvious you had an atttude from the beginning.
I am surprised the

There you go! Become builder/contractor. With your enginerring skills, background & knowlege you could make a fortune.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The reason that I had an attitude from the beginning was that I read posts from contractors that seemed to have big chips on their shoulders.
What kind of loser is going to say something like they will never shop at a store that gives their contractor discount to regular customers. What do you care about how a company decides to do business. Perhaps those losers like to be subsidized by the customer.
Why do some contractors make false bills and get fake receipts from supply stores? HUH, they are looking for ways to charge their customers more money. Just tell the truth. Bill honestly. Say that parts cost X and labor costs Y and possibly that overhead costs Z. Then the customers can compare the different proposals. You could also throw in one more column that gives likely buffers for problems that shoddy workmanship created. If you start to work and find problems that were hidden, then charge the customer that extra amount. If there are no hidden surprises, then tell the customers that they will get a discount. I think people would like that.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Then, if you're so smart, what in the world are you doing working for a living? Seems someone as smart as you would already have things figured out, and have the world working for HIM.
No?
sigh ........................
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sorry Steve, You need money to make money. I will likely be retired by 30 and living off the stock market.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You just explained plenty. You're too young to have much perspective on anything at all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have money. Last P&L statement was $3.2 million. And that's not counting the living trust where most of the family money rests. I am 58, and have been retired for two and a half years now. I own property and real estate in three states. The stock market is a sucker bet, so, I am content to get from 12% to 25% on first trust deeds, placed through a CFP I know from high school days. I netted $72k on that last year. Then, with income properties, pension, and other income streams, it runs about $180k a year with HEFTY business deductions.
Last year, I had to pay the big total of $7800 income tax. I drive a $38k new Dodge truck, which I was allowed to totally deduct last year as a business expense. Almost every lunch I eat, all the gas I buy, and every meal I eat at a restaurant goes down as a business expense.
I travel a lot. I go to Mazatlan, Maui, Cabo, and fishing a couple of times a year on the Kenai. I sleep until I am ready to get up. I own ATVs, boats, and so many guns I don't have count. I have a fully equipped 1500 sf shop. I camp and fish and do photography. Life is good.
How you doing?
We can all talk about what we're GOING to do. I'm only interested in what's REALLY happening.
You're not going to believe this, but then, I really don't give a shit about clueless twits like you.
With your attitude, you'll smart off to the wrong fellow, and you'll be worm food. I doubt if you live to be thirty.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tsk, tsk, tsk...such an attitude. Sounds like you are doing good...why are you getting so upset when I am pointing out common knowledge? Anyone that I have asked about contractors has the same complaints as me, so it seems to be a pervasive problem. Perhaps someone should pass some truth in advertising type laws for contractors so everything can be compared apples-to-apples. I was complaining about my bad luck with contractors. I am stating logical facts and my observations. It seems like I have touched a nerve. Perhaps you are haunted by nightmares of ripping people off?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's because you think the building code requires something it doesn't. Mostly, a house just has to not be actually dangerous. Since yours hasn't killed anyone, it's probably ok.

There is, in the US, no upper limit on the number of receptacles you can have one one circut. There is a lower limit on the number of available amps you can have in a room, but that's something trivial like 3 watts/sqft.
Why should circuts and rooms correspond? It makes far more sense to me to have WALLS and circuts correspond.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Goedjn wrote:

From a homeowner point of view, it would be nice to be able to shut off the "left bedroom" breaker and not interfere with other stuff.
In my house, for instance, I have to remember that "these two outlets are on that circuit, but the other one on that wall is this other circuit, while that one over there shares a circuit with the outside plugs and is thus GFCI-protected, while the lights are on this other circuit altogether". One room, five circuits.
It made things really interesting when I wanted to replace the outlets, as it involved basically mapping out the entire house. I can't just label the breakers, I need a floorplan with outlets and matching circuits marked on it.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris Friesen wrote:

Take a few minutes to remove all of your receptical/switch covers .. .. .. trace them back to their appropriate breaker, then write the breaker number on the back of the cover plate & put it back on .. .. .. you'll never again have to trace back an outlet. Just look on the back .. .. .. very simple.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.