Any suggestions for opening up this fence for infrequent passage?

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On Thu, 20 Jun 2013 08:13:02 -0700, Harry K wrote:

I like the idea. I think it's sort of like a "roll up" fence, or, more accurately, a "roll down" fence when I want to travel through it.
I'll google for some pictures to see what it looks like in practice (I'm not sure the keyword to use).
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I think I would just install a gate. It looks like the fence where you have the ladder is a chain link fence. I just helped my son install a fence and the parts were about $ 200 at Lowes. Part of this was for a roll of fence wire as he needed about 20 feet of fence installed also.
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On Thu, 20 Jun 2013 11:38:24 -0400, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I use the ladder to get over the fence all the time, so that was just an example of my ladder on my fence near the pool.
Unfortunately, the fence near the solar collectors is in a much more rugged part of the property, as the solar heater is on a steep hillside with a cliff below it and the fence above it.

The problem with the ladder on that more flimsy ranch-style fence is that the slope is much greater and the fence posts much flimsier.
It's hard to see in that picture, but, I'd guess there is a foot or maybe even two feet drop between the uphill ladder legs and the downhill ladder legs.
I generally brace the ladder around that sturdy post you see in that picture; but it's taking a lot of wear and tear as I weigh well over 250 pounds and I have to go up and over that ladder many times to fix the dozen leaks in the solar panels.
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In earlier post, I mentioned the idea of a swimming pool ladder.
http://www.easysource.us/images/products/pool%20ladder%20-%2042.jpg
Not as suited for big guys like us (I displace about 250 tons). But something like this could be made out of lumber, and painted.
The helper and walkie talkies would save a lot of walking about. But, I repeat myself. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
It's hard to see in that picture, but, I'd guess there is a foot or maybe even two feet drop between the uphill ladder legs and the downhill ladder legs.
I generally brace the ladder around that sturdy post you see in that picture; but it's taking a lot of wear and tear as I weigh well over 250 pounds and I have to go up and over that ladder many times to fix the dozen leaks in the solar panels.
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On Fri, 21 Jun 2013 07:39:18 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

What I like about that idea is the light weight; otherwise, it's the same as the ladder I'm using now (although the transition from side to side may be easier with the much wider steps of the swimming pool ladder).

I'm gonna see if I can enlist the wife on that endeavor today! (She's usually in "her" kitchen making something tasty - and doesn't normally cross into "my" domain, which is fixing stuff outside.)
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Pool ladders are often tubular aluminum, so light weight is true. Might need to put some concrete patio stones on the down hill end, cut them into the hill so they are level.
My Dad has had success hiring teenage boys from the neighborhood. In this application, a boy could be about 95% handheld video game, and about 5% having to perk up, answer the radio, and turn a valve. Might be a win win situation.
My parents also have domains. But, once in a while they communicate and work together. I remember the one time back in 1967, when..... . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
On Fri, 21 Jun 2013 07:39:18 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

What I like about that idea is the light weight; otherwise, it's the same as the ladder I'm using now (although the transition from side to side may be easier with the much wider steps of the swimming pool ladder).

I'm gonna see if I can enlist the wife on that endeavor today! (She's usually in "her" kitchen making something tasty - and doesn't normally cross into "my" domain, which is fixing stuff outside.)
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On Thu, 20 Jun 2013 09:32:28 -0700, Oren wrote:

<
http://ourprairienest.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/gate-fixtrip-022-800x600.jpg
Hi Oren, I like the concept because it's cheap and simple. I might have to make the opening a bit wider though! :)
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here is a totally different approach to the problem...
you need a radio remote control for the pump so you don't have to go back and forth so many times
Radio Shack makes one, you may need to get creative to wire it to your pump.
Mark
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Clap on, clap off! . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
you need a radio remote control for the pump so you don't have to go back and forth so many times
Radio Shack makes one, you may need to get creative to wire it to your pump.
Mark
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On Thursday, June 20, 2013 11:10:47 AM UTC-7, Danny D. wrote:

x600.jpg>

That's a good example of what I suggested. You'll need to run that wire ac ross from the top of the posts before you cut the fence or you'll have some very slack fence both directions from the gate. Requires you to duck unde r the wire every time yougo through though.
Harry K
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Danny D. wrote:

Construct a remote pump switch. Put this other pump switch on the end of a long electrical cord. After spotting the leak, flip the switch you carried to the roof with you.
Pump off.
Do your thing. Flip the switch to activate the pump
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On Fri, 21 Jun 2013 03:36:28 -0500, HeyBub wrote:

Hmmm... there "is" a remote pump switch (in the controller in the house); but I don't know how to tap into it.
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Handyman near you who does electrical? Run a length of UF, and put a temporary switch at the solar panel. Temporary wire it in, and undo the remote switch after you get the holes patched. If it's only a couple days, use outdoor extension cord. Some illegal adaptors, and ..... . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
On Fri, 21 Jun 2013 03:36:28 -0500, HeyBub wrote:

Hmmm... there "is" a remote pump switch (in the controller in the house); but I don't know how to tap into it.
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On topic, If this were my lot, I'd go to the hardware store, and ask the guys there. Swimming pool stores also deal with fences, and gates. Got to be something you can put in.
Less on topic of gates, do you have a helper? You can send directions over walkie talkies, water on, water off, that kind of thing. Save a lot of walking. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
On Thu, 20 Jun 2013 09:17:06 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I didn't put the fence in, but it's a wholly enclosed property, and it has a pool, so the fence is needed for insurance reasons. Plus it's in the mountains so there are plenty of wild animals. Plus the dogs need to
stay inside (although mine won't travel too far outside the fence when they get out).
The problem with the ladder is mainly that it's dangerous because it's hard to secure on the steep hillside; and I'm very likely to tip over.
Normally I don't even need to get to the solar panels. But, when I'm fixing them, there's a lot of travel to the pumps to turn them on and off (since you need them on to find the leak, and then you turn them off to fix the leak, and then you turn them on to test, and then move on to the
next leak).
I have tried, in the past, *marking* the leaks, but nothing seems to stay put that I've tried. I tried nail polish (but it won't stick to the wet plastic); I've tried chalk (it smears so you can't find the exact hole).
I even tried poking brightly colored pins near the holes (that works, but it's a pain).
So, all I *really* want is to get through the fence in an easy way rather infrequently. I know I can just cut it and wire it back up; but that's messy. So I was wondering what was out there to make temporary gates for
those corral style fences (as shown below):

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On Fri, 21 Jun 2013 07:35:56 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Actually, I was going to tackle the repair job today, and I made some overtures to the wife to that regard.
She is more of a 1950's style wife, where she takes care of the kitchen and grandkids and cleaning and ironing the laundry, etc., while I am the (sole) handyman for fixing and repairing things.
But, she likes swimming more than I do, so, and she doesn't have anywhere near the insulation that I have, so, I'll see if the portable phones on the Intercom setting will travel the distance to the equipment.
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Yes, perhaps your wife can be your helper. Failing that, if I needed a helper, I'd make some phone calls into my church congregation, and see who has a teenage boy who needs a few dollars. And who can follow instructions and tolerate some boredom. Who knows, you may be training your employee for when you go into solar panel repair business.
Are any of your grand kids old and mature enough to handle such a task? I can't comment on kids these days, but back when I was five or six, this would have thrilled me to the core to be such a helper. That was back in the days of CB radios, FRS had not been developed. And carbon zinc batteries, alkalines came out in the seventies, if I recall. Used FRS walkies are on Ebay, fairly cheaply. They have variety of uses, if you have someone to talk with. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
On Fri, 21 Jun 2013 07:35:56 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Actually, I was going to tackle the repair job today, and I made some overtures to the wife to that regard.
She is more of a 1950's style wife, where she takes care of the kitchen and grandkids and cleaning and ironing the laundry, etc., while I am the
(sole) handyman for fixing and repairing things.
But, she likes swimming more than I do, so, and she doesn't have anywhere near the insulation that I have, so, I'll see if the portable phones on the Intercom setting will travel the distance to the equipment.
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On Fri, 21 Jun 2013 09:47:29 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I play "college education" with them all the time. They tell me what to do, and I do it.
For example, when I'm spraying weeds with my 5-gallon batches of glyphosate, I hand them a spray can of paint, and they spray where they want me to spray.
Of course, everything takes ten times longer, but, I try to teach them while making it fun.
But, when it comes to "real" work, they're too young to help.
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From what I've seen of your fence, you could use a half dozen snap clips
http://www.bluewatersports.com/shop/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9 00x/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/l/a/large-bronze-swivelling-snap-cli p---no-3-0.jpg
to secure the fence. Cut the fence wires, one over the other. Maybe two or three links from a fence post. Make your own gate, and several snap clips to close the fence when not needed. Put the clips on the longer section of fence. Pull the fence around, and use the clips to hold it open.
How do you patch the leaks? Dry the area, and paint on some PVC glue? . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
I didn't put the fence in, but it's a wholly enclosed property, and it has a pool, so the fence is needed for insurance reasons. Plus it's in the mountains so there are plenty of wild animals. Plus the dogs need to
stay inside (although mine won't travel too far outside the fence when they get out).
The problem with the ladder is mainly that it's dangerous because it's hard to secure on the steep hillside; and I'm very likely to tip over.
Normally I don't even need to get to the solar panels. But, when I'm fixing them, there's a lot of travel to the pumps to turn them on and off (since you need them on to find the leak, and then you turn them off to fix the leak, and then you turn them on to test, and then move on to the
next leak).
I have tried, in the past, *marking* the leaks, but nothing seems to stay put that I've tried. I tried nail polish (but it won't stick to the wet plastic); I've tried chalk (it smears so you can't find the exact hole).
I even tried poking brightly colored pins near the holes (that works, but it's a pain).
So, all I *really* want is to get through the fence in an easy way rather infrequently. I know I can just cut it and wire it back up; but that's messy. So I was wondering what was out there to make temporary gates for
those corral style fences (as shown below):

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On Fri, 21 Jun 2013 07:45:32 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I went to Harbor Freight today, to pick up the snap clips, but they didn't have any in stock.

I've tried all sorts of glues; but the water is under pressure, and the rubber is not conducive to glues.
So what I do is order plugs by the hundreds from McMaster-Carr:

Then, with a hollowed out wine cork, I burn an insertion hole in the center; and then I cut open the leaking tubes; and I disable the entire tube by shoving one or two plugs in the upstream part of the tube (above the hole) and another set of plugs in the downstream part of the tube (below the hole).

In the pictures above, the five longer plugs are the manufacturer's plugs (at about 50 cents each!) while the shorter plugs are from McMaster-Carr (at about 10 cents each).
Since I use a couple hundred, it adds up.
(Don't ask me what I think of the Fafco Revolution Solar Panels, which each costs about $350.)
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I really have no clue. but would self drilling screw with gasket plug the hole?
http://dpjagan.com/fixing-fastners/
http://www.p-wholesale.com/cn-pro/19/752to1/din-7504-k-washer-hexagon-hea d-self-drilling-screw-with-rubber-washer-hosshja-681645.html
Once you find the leaky spot, pop a screw into the magnetic nut setter tip, put cordless drill into forward, and screw a plug into the hole.
I know, nutty, and won't work? . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .

I've tried all sorts of glues; but the water is under pressure, and the rubber is not conducive to glues.
So what I do is order plugs by the hundreds from McMaster-Carr:

Then, with a hollowed out wine cork, I burn an insertion hole in the center; and then I cut open the leaking tubes; and I disable the entire tube by shoving one or two plugs in the upstream part of the tube (above the hole) and another set of plugs in the downstream part of the tube (below the hole).

In the pictures above, the five longer plugs are the manufacturer's plugs (at about 50 cents each!) while the shorter plugs are from McMaster-Carr (at about 10 cents each).
Since I use a couple hundred, it adds up.
(Don't ask me what I think of the Fafco Revolution Solar Panels, which each costs about $350.)
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