Any product from China worth buying?

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Wear more Made in China warm clothing and skip the space heater thingies.
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Rich: The opposite reason to why we prefer to buy a Japanese brand vehicle; 'manufactured/assembled in Japan'. Even if it costs a little more! The last two "Japanese" vehicles we have were assembled somewhere in Tennessee IIRC? Probably have had some real Japanese parts but definitely minor differences and deficiencies from the genuine Japanese article! For example you don't expect vehicles manufactured for and in North America to have wiper problems! Both of these did. In other words to lower costs. Eventually, probably fairly soon, China and India will get to the point of producing good vehicles. Back in the 1930s Japanese goods were considered junk. Now Japan produces the most reliable vehicles! Also much of the higher quality electronics etc. AND JAPAN IS AN EXPENSIVE COUNTRY WITH VERY FEW NATURAL RESOURCES OF ITS OWN. We in North America are also suffering from the Wal Mart Syndrome. WM drives down prices so severely, often by leaning on the manufacturers that quality suffers. Saw some figures recently that Wal Mart USA alone annually buys more goods from China than the GDP of some of the world's nations! So they have a major influence on world quality of goods.
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On Sat, 24 Nov 2007 20:40:49 -0800 (PST), terry

So why are we buying this stuff made in other countries anyhow. We only hurt ourselves with lack of jobs and higher taxes here in the US. I must admit I like a bargain as much as anyone else, but often those bargains end up costing more in the end. Spend $20 on an electric heater that lasts one year, or spend $30 on one that lasts 10 years. I am well aware of those cheap CF bulbs and I too have had them go up in smoke and sparks. I'm starting to phase them out and go back to regular bulbs, partially because they never last long, so where is the savings, but more so because I think they are a fire hazzard. China tools are pure crap. I dont buy the most expensive tools, but I am not going to spend a cent on some tool that bends in my hands when I use it, and busts a few knuckles too. I just needed some of the larger torx sockets. Not something I use very often so I was not going to spend much. A no-name china made set sold for $21, a Stanley set was $29. Or an expensive top pf the line set was $59. I decided to pay the $29. Stanley is not the best of all tools, but sure beats some no-name China crap, which will probably snap off at a critical moment and really piss me off, if not do more damage. I think Stanley is made in the USA, but I did not look this time since I was hurried. I could just see it was a better made tool then the el-cheapo china crud.
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snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote:

Adam Smith in "The Wealth of Nations" (1776) settled this hash years ago when he proved that countries should do what they do "best."

If you're only going to use the heater for one year, why pay a $10 premium?
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The king of this movement is good old Wallmart they led the charge to China , Mexico and to who ever could make it for what they wanted it. Face it America corpreate America is bitting you in the ass we get the same shit up here in Canada . It is sad but we want cheap prices so we get it for cheap for a reason.
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wrote:

Exactly the reason to NOT shop at Walmart. I only go there if I absolutely must, like if I need toilet paper or pet food and all other stores are closed. Walmart sucks in every way.
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HeyBub wrote:

He didn't "prove" anything.

But durable goods are typically purchased for longer usage periods (thats why they are called durable). And then there is the issue of what to do with all of the Walmart junk that fills landfills because you need to buy one every year instead of maybe every 20 years.
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George wrote:

He proved a great deal to the analytical, rational, and open mind. He postulated that there were three axioms to creating wealth: Division of labor, Self interest, and Free trade. The "Invisible Hand" of the market corrects for imbalance because people DO act in their own self-interest (whether they SHOULD, he left up to the parsons). His work has been recognized as the equivalent to economics as Principia Mathematica by Newton was to physics.

Very much of the "junk" goes back to China, not landfills (over 1 million tons per year, by recent estimates). http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/business/articles/1124biz-toxic1124.html
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Stanley tool, for example, has 20,000 employees at 114 manufacturing and distribution centers in 20 countries. In today's global market, the line is blurred as to what "made in USA" means. The one thing Stanley tool and every other manufacturer still control, is the quality they demand from overseas plants. There is and always has been a demand for cheap manufacture goods. It's unfair to blame China for supplying them, and it's ludicrous to believe the Chinese incapable of manufacturing quality products
wrote:

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believe
Less expensive and crap and not synonyms. There were always lower end products, with fewer features and no frills. This can be accomplished by methods other than bad welds and crimps on portable heaters.
If you believe the women in China are told to make bad crimps on wires, you're off your rocker. They do that because they don't know any better and their boss does not care.
Yeah, maybe 20 years from now the quality will improve, but I doubt it. There will always be cheaper (read less trained) labor in China, so do not expect things to change in our lifetime. Comparison to Japan is pointless - two totally different cultures.
I have not seen a product from China which is well made, from C-clamps, to pair of pliers, to dust bins, to DVD players. Whenever possible I look for US made goods, but that's hardly possible anymore, regardless of price. Needless to say the likes of Wal-Mart play a major hand in this.
RichK
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Exactly, there are thousands of companies in China that only have the capability of crankin out crap. There are also thousands of companies in China capable of making top of the line anything. We get what we pay for. I think your dissatisfaction should be directed at the parent companies who clearly ignore quality control.
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RBM wrote:

Wonder what worker's comp. disability benefits are in China?
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Norminn wrote:

The worker's family pays for the bullet?
--
Angry American flags attack Hillary Clinton!

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Norminn wrote:

They kick you out of the way, bring in another worker, fire you and harvest your organs for resale to the worlds rich. That way the company doesn't lose money because of loss of production from the time needed to force the next person to work the unsafe conditions.
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wrote:

None. Low level factory jobs are not career jobs. Migrant workers work three or four years and move up, move out , move home or start their own enterprises.
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PaPaPeng wrote:

I guess then that this means that they have no incentive to improve their skills as far as manufacturing.
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 20:58:39 GMT, do snipped-for-privacy@do.com wrote:

Wrong. There is this intense hunger to learn everything they can while in the city and the factory. This is on the job education and training they never got at home. They had seen how peasants like themselves go to the cities before them and come back and prosper. They have seen how unschooled peasants like themselves become millionaires overnight. The old middle class had been destroyed by Mao. There is no old money and no old money power or class to block their rise. The new middle class are people like themselves. No doubt only a fraction will realise that dream of becoming significantly better than their old station. But everything is possible. The opportunities are wide open in every field and service. China is on the move. They know no one will give it to them. They will make it for themselves.
I spent a few hours at Beijing's central train station watching migrant workers come and go. That place has easily 10,000 people at any one time. Those that were heading back had a distinct look of hope and confidence in their eyes and in their gait. Those that were coming in looked a bit lost but in no way were they frightened or submissive. They certainly didn't look or carry themselves like they were downtrodden and destitute. They are the future of China for they are truely the sons and daughters of the land.
During my stay I watched a program on CCTV and it featured a self taught artis, now a university prof and one of the most wellknown in China, who came from one of the poorest parts of Shaanxi Province. One portrait of his featured three peasants squatting down in the train station that began as a video clip panning on to them and then dissolving into the acrylic portrait that captured exquisitely the hope in their eyes and the slightly opened lips gaping in wonder at their first arrival in a big city and their entry into a new life. It was then I realised that was exactly what I saw at the train station, the future of China. It was an awesome feeling.
I asked my host how it is possible for an unschooled artist to become an art professor at the university. She said yes, but it no longer possible to do so. It was the Cultural Revolution that wiped out a decade of schooling. When the schools reopened any one who passed the entrance exams or had exceptional talent could be admitted to university. This is true because I have a married couple friend whose husband is a senior Heart Surgeon and the wife an Internist and WHO scholar. He missed school and went the entrance exam admission route. She had four years high school, no elementary. I also met another husband and wife team of top molecular biologists with PhDs from the States and only a batchelor's from China (no elhi schooling).
If the above sounds improbable and unbelievable it does except I have come across many such examples in real life. Do read the book (Amazon.com product link shortened) Gang of One: Memoirs of a Red Guard (American Lives) (Hardcover) by Fan Shen (Author) that has several chapters on his childhood while caught up in the Cultural Revolution. He too had no elhi schooling and he now lectures English in a NYC college if I remember.
Yes and read that National Geographic article too "China's Boomtowns. http://www7.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0706/feature4/index.html?fs=www3.nationalgeographic.com&fs=plasma.nationalgeographic.com
This brings to mind another anecdote. My elderly relative visited Shenzen the boomtown near Hongkong. Only in China will you get a sightseeing tour that includes a visit to a sweatshop factory. So she chatted up this girl worker. She said. "Yes we know the shoe sells for $100. Our boss gets only a few dollars profit and pays us 40 cents an hour. We don't care. China has been poor for too long. We will work hard. China will grow rich. Then we will show them."
And that sirs is the competition you face.
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snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote:

Because walmart has everyone hypnotized into thinking the only important thing to worry about is price and most people really don't understand the slippery slope of gutting your own economy and manufacturing and enabling another to be the next dominant world power. "low prices everyday" is a powerful siren song.
We

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snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote in part:

CFLs tend to be better if these guidelines are followed:
* If they are of "Big 3" brands: GE, Philips and Sylvania.
* If they have the "Energy Star" logo.
* Ones with ballasts included inside (all common screw base ones) are supposed to be UL listed. Dollar store CFLs are often not. I have also seen dollar store junk (specifically an extension cord) with fake UL listing. One dollar store model has been recalled for being known to have its ballast housing made with non-fire-retardant plastic. Good ones with valid UL listing are made with fire retardant plastic.
* CFLs tend to fail to be more economical when used where they are only on for a short period of time, such as in motion sensor lights, refrigerators, and restrooms used mainly for short trips.
* It is common for integral-ballast CFLs to overheat in recessed ceiling fixtures. CFLs used in recessed ceiling fixtures should be any of these:
a) Specifically rated for recessed ceiling fixtures, such as Philips non-dimmable SLS of wattage up to 23 watts
b) A flodlight style type, obviously made to be likely to be used in such fixtures, and preferably of lower wattage (under 20 watts)
c) Lower wattages such as 14 watts or less are generally less likely to overheat
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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CFLs should not be used on dimmers.
Also proper disposal of these should be considred since it may have lead in it.
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