Any ladies here?

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Sorry guys, just think there might be more ladies with good answers to this one.
The draw string on my sweat pants came out during the last wash. What is a good method for putting it back?
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I happen to me an expert at this, I use the same technique as was developed for kid's sweat shirt hood strings.
But let's see what that the ladies proffer ..........
cheers Bob
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I'm no lady but I know how to do that.
Attach the string to a safety pin and work it back through by pinching the end of the pin from the outside of the pants.
Or you could send a fish tape through your pants and attach the string to that.
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I was thinking coat hanger bent into a circle, and tape the string onto the end of the coat hanger. Copper eletric wire also good, 14 gage probably work.
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wrote:

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Steve B wrote:

D'oh!
I've found 14AWG THHN to be quite handy stuff to have around. I just used it to fish some wire through the hatch of my girlfriend's car. I was wiring up the rear fog light, if you really must know (it's a VW Corrado - yes, I hate people that drive around with their rear fog lights on when it's not foggy; but it also bugs the crap out of me that there's a switch on the dash from the factory with two positions and the second position does nothing. Does that make me obsessive compulsive?)
Yes, I pulled some 14AWG stranded behind the THHN once I got it where I needed to get it. Attempting to snake the stranded through directly would have been like trying to push spaghetti through conduit.
nate
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BobK207 wrote in message

to
What
Attach a closed safety pin to the end and thread it through.
Cheri
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wrote:

I'm no lady, but I have fixed this problem multiple times on various coats, jackets, sweatshirts, and sweatpants. It takes a bigass needle. Cut the long part off a coat hanger, or find a knitting needle or skinny disposable chopstick. A piece of electricians fishing tape would also work, if the holes are big. Tape the cord to the end in such a way that it doesn't make a big lump, and gently work it back through the item of clothing. Once through, disconnect the tool, and add knots or whatever to keep the cord ends out in daylight. For sweatpants, I just tie the cord ends together, and adjust them with another slipknot as needed. Note- always undue the adjustment knot before washing, so it doesn't fuse solid like a kid's wet shoelace.
You can still buy kid-size hoodies with strings? I thought they banned those from the playground-ape sizes, due to strangle hazard. (Moot point around here- the schools have banned hoodies, and the stores stopped carrying them. Gang dress, ya know.)
aem sends....
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Jim wrote:

Pin a small safety pin to the end of the drawstring and feed it through the hem. If there is an eyelet and a safety pin won't fit through it, wrap a narrow strip of duct tape around the string (like the end of a shoelace) and feed that through.
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Safety pin method was what I grew up with.
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Amanda wrote:

Looks like that will be my choice of action. Now to find where the small safety pins are.
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Jim wrote:

Usually on the rack by the cash register :o) I almost bought my son a sewing basket on my last visit - not ruffles and flowers, of course. The search for needle and thread was longer than normal. Of course, duct tape and wire will mend almost anything 'til ya' get to mom's.
If you have a needle and thread, fix the sweats after you get the drawstring back in. Sew a couple of stitches on the back inside through the fabric and the drawstring - then it will stay where it belongs.
I'm surprised nobody cussed you out for not posting at alt.sweats.drawstrings.
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wrote:

My mother made up a sewing kit for me when I went off to college. She used mostly things she had duplicates of by her age.
She put it in my father's old toiletry kit, not to make it manly, but because she saved my father's stuff after he died and this was a way to use that. Latch was damaged and wasn't really good for toiletries anymore.
I still have the kit 40+ years later, with the pin cushion, pins, needles, spools of common colors fo thread, thimble, etc.
As to safety pins, I dont' think she gave me any, but the summer after high school, I was a Fuller Brush man, selling brushes, toilet, and cleaning supplies door to door. Somehow, I tore the seam in my pants from 3 inches below the waist all the way to the middle back to front. Rather than go home, I went to a store and bought about 20 pins on a piece of wire. After I took off the pants, I put the safety pins in the sewing kit, and they lasted me about 25 years before I used them all up.

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Actually you need one that's just a bit smaller than the casing on your sweat pants. The casing is the "tube" sewn to let the drawstring through.
Banty
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I'm male, but fixed my draw string on my hooded sweat jacket using a coat hanger wire. Using a pair of pliers I put a small loop on one end. When you're done, put bigger knots on the ends or tie the ends together every time it's ready for the laundry.
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Jim wrote:

Throw them away and buy a new set.
Being a male is tough.
It's almost cheaper to buy a new shirt than to have one laundered.
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I think next time my wife ask I'll tell her that this is a ladies job, "Honestly I read it..." The easiest way to do this is with the "fish tape" method but instead of using real fish tape use some of the harder plastic line from a weed eat / whipped snipper. It's worked like a charm every time.
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HotRod wrote:

What is it they say about the difference between men and boys ... the price of their tools? The difference between men and women:
Guy: Have to go buy a new tool to do this. Women: Fish something out of the drawer in the kitchen for this job.
:o)
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Girls will generally suggest attaching the end of the string to the largest safety pin you can find, and working it through the casing. Me, I use fish tape. If you don't have fish tape, use a bent coat hanger.
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Goedjn wrote:

There must be a genetic factor to the choice of tools for this task. I just asked my husband what he would use; coathanger!
It just dawned on me that there is an entire generation alive that might never have seen a safety pin ... Pampers babies!
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