Any guidelines for computing how many cans?

Trying to decide how many recessed can I really need to properly lit a room (9' ceiling). Is there any guideline on how to calculate this? Is it based on area or other factors?
Thanks,
MC
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Go to the Halo (Cooper Electric) website and check out the datasheets for their trim. Some of them will have diagrams showing the light patterns for a given bulb and trim. Generally it depends on:
Size of can: The larger the can the higher wattage bulb you can use and the more options you have for bulb type and wattage.
Bulb type (size/shape, flood or spot)
Wattage
Trim kit used.
Type of lighting wanted (general, accent, spot, etc.)

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MiamiCuse wrote:

Some factors affecting lighting design:
- Ceiling height - Beam spread of the trim used on the fixture - Wattage of the bulb used in the fixture - Desired light level in the room - Tolerance to hot spots and uneven lighting - Reflectivity of wall, ceiling, floor and furnishings - Tasking of fixtures, i.e. wall wash, counter task light, etc. - Other light sources in the room i.e. table, desk and floor lamps - Items in the room vulnerable to reflection issues i.e. TVs, framed art with glass, etc.
Fixture and trim specifications are on the manufacturers sites. Normally you would work up a floor plan for the room including fixed items and expected furnishings, determine light levels appropriate for the type of room (tables of recommended levels available various places), and determine fixture placement to give the desired results. The is a lot of CAD software for planning this type of stuff.
Good lighting design is a lot more complicated that it seems at first glance.
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buffalo ny: put enough in that you can run them on a remote controlled dimmer for everything from mood to reading without glare on the tv. to play with a light meter would also allow you to take into account the lighter wall and ceiling colors reflecting some light, but why bother. the other idea would be go with a few circuits to allow occupancy sensor mood night light upon entry to the room, 3-way or 4-way switching depending on size of room and exits. i'm turning into a big fan of red heat lamp in winter so add one over my recliner chair, they are 250 watts, allow for this higher wattage in all fixtures for flexibility as light bulbs are still evolving. table reading lamps need to be up to 250 watts. -b
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