Any fireplace wood stove people here?

A neighbor of mine had a fire last night that caused extensive damage to his house. They may total it.
Seems he came home from a month travel, and built a fire in a wood stove. Not a good idea because there was time for bird to nest, and for other reasons.
His is the same as mine, a double walled chimney pipe, about ten inches diameter of the largest piece.
His ran from floor through a framed opening two stories up, then through the ceiling, attic, and roof. Distance from ceiling to roof, approximately five feet.
The stove had two pipes, one for a wood stove on each floor. Upon looking at the framed vertical rectangular space around the two flues, it seemed very small, with only about six inches clearance on the sides. At the time of building, I'm sure it was code compliant. Not absolutely sure yet as to what caused the flue to get so hot it ignited the framework.
I have a slightly similar situation, but my flue only goes through the roof a distance of three feet, my pitch being less than his. I have the sheetmetal standoffs (jacks, I think they're called) that go through the ceiling and roof.
What else can I do to get up there and make sure that my framing and trusses and roof are not getting too hot? Is there fireproof or fire retardant sheeting that I can box in with as far out from the vertical flues as I can? Is there special insulation wrap for the flues?
I'm going to go to a fireplace shop and ask for a pro to come look at it, but wanted to get some slight idea of what is involved.
My insurance doubled this year upon installation of a wood burner, even though all the measurements are within the limits set by stove manufacturer and safety codes. I'd just like to give it a little extra margin of safety.
Thanks in advance.
Steve
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buffalo ny: creosote buildup was blamed in our aunt mary's brick chimney caught fire thirty years ago and the innocent enough trigger seemed to be christmas present wrappings tossed on an already going wood fireplace fire. in eden ny this was the third chimney fire for the volunteer fire department that week. the usual family gathering was surprised by the arrival of the fire department, great neighbors called it in, and there was plenty of excitement but without any major loss. thank god, i guess you clean those things each year? call a pro. -b
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SteveB wrote:

One of the most critical things is having the correct chimney pipe, and there are two basic types.
There is an air insulated double wall pipe that is used for gas fireplaces and the like, just two galvanized steel pipes with air between them which is normally vented at the ends to allow convection cooling.
The chimney pipe used for a wood burning fireplace / stove is made of stainless steel (at least the inner pipe is), and has an insulating material between the pipes, not just air. Wood burners produce more corrosive content in their exhaust, hence the SS, and significantly higher temperatures.
Covering all surfaces close to the chimney pipe and stove with 5/8" type X "fire code" sheetrock is one easy upgrade, though not always cosmetically appealing. Placing another fire and heat resistant material over the sheetrock, such as stainless sheet or tile can improve the aesthetics.
Residential fire sprinkler systems are available as well, and in some cases can be quite simple and inexpensive, i.e. a wet system with a couple thermal sprinkler heads directly connected to the house city water supply is very inexpensive compared to a commercial grade dry system.
Asking your insurance company what upgrades would be acceptable to them to lower your rates would certainly be appropriate, as would quoting from other companies since they aren't all the same.
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SteveB wrote:

you light it to keep the lower end clean. You should also have a stove with an automatic draft control. The variations in atmospheric pressure, wind and humidity with changing weather change the draft characteristics. To maintain the same temperature fire some days you need the draft partly open other days it burns hot with it closed. If you go somewhere and leave the draft open you asking for trouble. The air could change the the stove turn into a smelter and burn your house down. Close it up before you leave it it's not automatic. Some insurances won't cover you if you get a wood stove. In my state they made it illegal to have a wood stove in the garage (Like anybody follows that law) because of the proximity to the car gas tanks and gas cans for lawn mowers and snowblowers. Some people just can't think properly and human error is always the cause of fire and death. Insurance companies first order of business is 'cut the losses'.
--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 :) 7/8

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SteveB wrote:

A properly built and maintained chimney/flue does not just get too hot and one day start a fire. However a chimney fire will do that. At over 2000 deg. F it will severely damage and even melt metal flue pipes. Heat can burn through or transfer enough heat through a brick and morter chimney to start a fire in surrounding structure. The key is to prevent chimney fires from happening in the first place by having the chimney inspected and cleaned. Google [chimney fire]. Here is one with photos: http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infchimneyfire/infchimneyfire.html
Kevin
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If this pipe is single wall, the code is 18" from combustable walls and 24" from a combustable ceiling. There is double wall stove pipe that can lower clearances based on manufacturer testing. DuraVent is 6" to wall.

The height requirement is 2 feet above ant point within ten feet, with a three foot minumum penetration.

The Class A chimney normally has 2" clearance, this must be air. Do not cover this area with anything, including insulation.

I suggest a certified chimney sweep. A listing can be found on this industry site: http://www.csia.org
John Galbreath Jr. www.FireLogs.com
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