Any experience with home blood pressure cuff

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wrote:

Keeping your reply for reference. Thanks Steve.
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Doug wrote:

There is a name for chronic high BP. Silent killer.
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A million times? That's almost 100 times a day, every day, for 30 years.

Omeron?
Lisinopril is cheap but my shoulders aren't. After taking it for a few months, I couldn't move them (took a while to isolate it to the Lisinopril). Every one of these drugs can have serious side effects. Let the doctors figure out which ones have the minimum side effects for you.

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For someone with so much high BP experience, you sure seem clueless. There is one very comman. blatantly obvious, almost universal symptom of high BP. A bloody nose!
I was about 46, sitting in my cubicle, at my computer workstation, with nary a care in the world. Suddenly, I was spouting blood all down the front of my shirt/tie. What the...!!??. I hadn't had a bloody nose in over 40 yrs. I wasn't sick. I was the picture of health, or so I thought. After a cow orker helped me stop the bleeding, my supervisor came over to see how I was doing. After listening to my baffled explanation/apology, he suggested I see a doctor, as I jes might be suffering from high blood pressure.
Well, these bloody noses plagued me fer another week till I finally got to the clinic. Sure enough. 200/150! Again, what the...?? Every time I'd had my BP checked, previously, it was a steady 125/75. So often and consistent, in fact, even I had become somewhat amazed. Now, almost overnight, I'm about to explode!
Anyway, not only is it a very common sympton, I get it at the drop of a hat. If I miss my meds fer even 2 days, bloody nose! I now care for my senile mom, from whom I no doubt inherited HBP, as she has it too. If she misses her meds even ONE day, bloody nose! So, it's not only quite common, but seems most everyone --'cept you-- knows about it. Now you know. ;)
nb
--
"I didn't know I worked here.
I must've forgot my apron"
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That's not a good indicator either. I had bloody noses constantly when I was a kid. No hypertension then and I grew out of it (having one artery in the nose cauterized helped). For years I've only gotten bloody noses when I get a severe cold. Nothing to do with hypertension.

When I ended up in the urgent care facility it was 260/200. Next stop, the emergency room and three days in the hospital. I didn't even feel the A-Fib until they told me about it.

It my be common but, by itself, it's not a good negative indicator of HT.
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Bloody nose can also be from calcium shortage.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:
For someone with so much high BP experience, you sure seem clueless. There is one very comman. blatantly obvious, almost universal symptom of high BP. A bloody nose!
I was about 46, sitting in my cubicle, at my computer workstation, with nary a care in the world. Suddenly, I was spouting blood all down the front of my shirt/tie. What the...!!??. I hadn't had a bloody nose in over 40 yrs. I wasn't sick. I was the picture of health, or so I thought. After a cow orker helped me stop the bleeding, my supervisor came over to see how I was doing. After listening to my baffled explanation/apology, he suggested I see a doctor, as I jes might be suffering from high blood pressure.
Well, these bloody noses plagued me fer another week till I finally got to the clinic. Sure enough. 200/150! Again, what the...?? Every time I'd had my BP checked, previously, it was a steady 125/75. So often and consistent, in fact, even I had become somewhat amazed. Now, almost overnight, I'm about to explode!
Anyway, not only is it a very common sympton, I get it at the drop of a hat. If I miss my meds fer even 2 days, bloody nose! I now care for my senile mom, from whom I no doubt inherited HBP, as she has it too. If she misses her meds even ONE day, bloody nose! So, it's not only quite common, but seems most everyone --'cept you-- knows about it. Now you know. ;)
nb
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On Sun, 29 Jul 2012 13:56:32 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

It can also be from thin arteries or arteries very close to the surface in the nose[*]. When I was younger, a little head cold would do it for me. It's really only been ten years, or so, that I haven't gotten fairly regular nose bleeds.
[*] or perhaps even a (too) close encounter with a fist. ;-) I used to turn other kid's shirts red.
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I asked the sales lady in a pharmacy dept which one had the least complaints. She said the Omron models. I bought one, the arm model, and it works good. No complaints from me. It's as automatic as you can get, checks BP, pulse rate, and arrhythmia at the push of 1 button.
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One of the wrist models I had tested for arrhythmia and wouldn't read anything if it couldn't get a regular heartbeat. You wouldn't think it unusual that the cuff would fail if it couldn't get a consistent beat, unless the whole reason you were using the damned thing was because of A-Fib. :-(
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On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 20:45:59 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

We have both wrist and cuff. My wife had A-fib (now fixed) and both would indicate if she was out of sync. Of course, the heart rate of 180 gave you a hint too.
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Did she have a cardioversion or did they go all the way to the ablaision? The heart rate, if will count it, is a hint, yes.
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On Sun, 29 Jul 2012 01:10:48 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

At least two cardioversions and two ablations in the past year. Doctor did not have enough time to do all he wanted as the anesthesiologist nixed more time.
First problem was on vacation in 2001. We were in VA and she felt a bit tired for a couple of days. On the way home, she wanted to see a doctor NOW. Followed the blue H sign off the highway and ended up staying 6 days in a Maryland hospital.
Highest I ever saw here heart rate was 220 a couple of years ago.
She still takes a bunch of medications every day, including warfarin. .
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That she's still on Warfarin indicates, with all that, they didn't fix it? One cardioversion was enough to fix mine. In five and a half years, mine hasn't come back for more than thirty minutes, or so. After the cardioversion, they just put me on Metoprolol and I've been on a couple of BP medications intermittently since (Amlodipine, now). If I skip the Metoprolol I can really feel it, though.
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On Sun, 29 Jul 2012 12:15:17 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

She also has a blood condition Lupus Anticoagulant Anti Cardiolipin Antibodies
When we first married, she had five miscarriages and they never found a reason. Thirty five years later, they found out why. The condition was not known at the time and no tests for it. Because of this, they keep her PT in a very narrow range of 2.5 to 3.0. She also has to be tested by blood draw rather than a home machine as the machine cannot perform accurately with her blood.
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Yikes! That doesn't sound good at all.

My mother had seven miscarriages in the seven years between number three and number four (me). Dad didn't stop trying, though. ;-)

That's normal for having active A-Fib (IIRC, they wanted mine between 2.0 and 2.5). When I was in A-Fib I had blood drawn every two days. The better the vampires got at finding the arteries in my hands the harder they got to get blood from. ;-) They would have me run my hands under hot water for five minutes before they'd even try.
I sure hope they keep her on en even keel. That sounds like a PITA. Good luck!
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On 7/29/2012 5:32 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

?? That's not good....did they ever use a blood pressure cuff as a tourniquet? Hard to miss that way unless the patient has no BP.

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No, they just used the rubber hoses on me. ;-)
Now when I have blood tests I tell the vampire to use the veins on the back of my hands. They always try the wrists first, anyway, but after a few misses they listen.

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On 7/30/2012 12:06 AM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Idiots. Probably have tourniquet too tight. It is rare that if one cannot SEE a vein one cannot FEEL it. Tourniquet too tight = vein doesn't fill. With BP cuff on the arm, and inflated to right point, the vein fills and cannot empty so it really stands out. The high number is the pressure of the arteries when the heart contracts, low number is pressure when heart relaxes. Set the BP cuff pressure between the numbers and the arteries are filling up the veins but blood isn't returning to the heart....kind of like the difference between a flat balloon and one filled with air.
I'm a nurse and chicken s--- about needles, so I've always made sure I had a good candidate BEFORE I stuck a needle in. Self-imposed limit was two tries. No babies.
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I like that plan. I've found that if they can't get it in two tries they're not going to get it in six (the same person may get it right the first time next week). Let someone else try.
Many years ago (college days) I had Mono and was going through cycles where my temperature would spike, then I'd turn white as a sheet and start seating buckets as my fever broke. Just as the fever broke a nurse was trying to get some blood. She was visibly shaken and asked, "Are you sick or something?". Even though I'd never felt worse in my life, I burst out laughing. She got someone else to draw the blood.
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On 7/30/2012 1:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I had mono in nursing school, back in the days when student nurses were THE hospital staff. My glands in my neck were huge and my blood count way off, so I was sent to the hematologist, health service worried about leukemia. In all of the hubub, they forgot to send me home for a month like they did all of the others with mono....convinced me for a while that I did have leukemia. Then came the night of my fiancee's senior dance at his college; not about to miss that, temp of 104. Aspirin made the night go well. Then admin found out that I had left the dorm whilst sick and called a meeting of the student body....nurses should know better, blah, blah, blah. They let me work my ass off taking care of eight patients whilst sick ... talk about being damned fatigued!!
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