Any experience with home blood pressure cuff

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My wife has been harping on me to buy her a blood pressure cuff. Personally, I'm not sure what she plans on doing with it. I don't know anything about them.
Anyone here have experience with home blood pressure testing? Any recommendations?
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Umpteen years ago, I did take a course on measuring BP. Took a couple hours, and was very informative. I'd make some calls, and see if any of the ambulance bases around you can find such a course.
You think your BP might go down a bit, if she'd stop harping on you?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
My wife has been harping on me to buy her a blood pressure cuff. Personally, I'm not sure what she plans on doing with it. I don't know anything about them.
Anyone here have experience with home blood pressure testing? Any recommendations?
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On 07/28/2012 01:37 PM, Vinny P. wrote:

use and seems to get numbers closer to what the nurse at my doctor's office gets (nothing scientific here, though).
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On 7/28/2012 2:37 PM, Vinny P. wrote:

I've got an arm unit and a cheapo HD wrist unit and don't like either. The arm one is difficult to attach properly and the wrist does not agree with it. I prefer testing on the drug store machines.
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They're not very expensive easy to use and accurate (or at least they produce consistent readings).
The one I got has a USB port but had no information in the package about how to use it. So far, it resists all my attempts to get data out of the unit.
I'd look for one that at least claims in the packaging that the USB port works. I good computer based BP history would be worthwhile I think.
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Jes so happens I bought a brand new "Aneroid Sphygmomanometer":
http://tinyurl.com/cmwtjt2
Works exactly like the one yer doctor uses. The difference is, this unit has the stethoscope built into the cuff so you don't hafta hold it while you are letting the air outta the cuff. This is as it should be, as a unit with a separate stethoscope is harder to use cuz you only have so many hands. This one also has a re-zero-able gage, the reason I hadda toss my old one, which didn't.
This is the most accurate way to take yer own blood pressure. You can actually slow the release of air in the cuff down to the point where it's slow enough to get an extremely accurate reading, unlike automatic ones. If you are not savvy as to how blood pressure is taken/read, ask yer doctor or a nurse. It's actually rather simple and a manual cuff gives you precise accurate control.
I had an auto digital blood pressure unit, but didn't trust it. I tossed it and bought this one, which looks exactly like the one I had before, 'cept my other one didn't have a re-settable gage.
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I won't use them either. Had a patient that was getting a BP medicine, the auto had him as having a high blood pressure, which he hadn't had the whole hospitalization. Redid it manually and got a BP that was real low. If I had used the auto I would have crashed him.
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On 7/28/2012 3:53 PM, notbob wrote:

column type of display. However, accurate BP measurement depends both on the meter reading the pressure and on the correct detection of the point where the pulse sounds are first able to be heard and when the first disappear. The digital ones may be more accurate than the aneroid because the springs in the aneroid type can go out of adjustment more easily. If you use a machine that requires using a stethoscope, at the age at which most of us need to monitor our BP, our hearing is not as sharp as it used to be. Unless you've got close to normal hearing, and are in a quiet room, you're likely to miss the transition points when you first hear the pulse and the transition point where the sound of the pulse first disappears. You might also misposition the stethoscope. For home use, a self-inflating automated cuff with digital measurement is more likely to provide an accurate reading.
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I might also stick a shotgun up my ass and blow my brains out, but I don't.
The problem I see with automated units is they deflate at a set rate. A manual unit, that rate of deflation can be controlled. So, if the auto unit deflates and the sound/bounce of the heartbeat occurs after or before the true pressure --old springs, battery, whatever-- the true reading is wrong. I can slow a manual unit's deflation down to a speed where the heartbeat point is more easily dectected and a more accurate pressure is read.
Jes my take on it. You do as you like. I get my new manual unit on Wed. I already tossed the Amron. ;)
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On 7/29/2012 4:10 PM, notbob wrote:

Maybe in an Amron but the typical Omron is electronic and there are no springs. And in typical digital device fashion if it thinks the batteries are low it simply doesn't work.
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On 7/29/2012 4:10 PM, notbob wrote:

the automated deflation cuffs have been engineered to accurately and rapidly measure the changing pressures as they happen. It's a non-issue. Many doctors offices and hospitals use fully automated inflation/deflation digital blood pressure machines.
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Vinny P. wrote:

I have A&D Engineering Inc.'s UA-731 which runs on four AA batteries. When I had kidney trouble I used it quite a bit. Pretty accurate. Still working after 20 years use. Drug store sells them.
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On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 18:37:11 +0000 (UTC), "Vinny P."

Omron seems to have good units. My wife uses one and my son (who is in the medical equipment business) recommends them.
They are very accurate, but, you have to know a little about what affects the readings to get consistent and accurate readings. Simple, really, what you get after some activity is not the same as what you get after relaxing for 15 minutes. Follow the instructions, take the readings at about the same time and activity level.
You may want to experiment just to see the differences. Take a reading, go split a half cord of wood and take another readings.
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Hard to split a half a cord of wood around Houston suburb. On the other hand I have a picture of a cousin of mine in Ogdensburg, NY who splits his own word at his retired age. Come to think of it with all my wisdom <or lack of>, what is a cord of word in terms of quantity? Obviously I'm a city boy unlike a lot of my cousins from upstate NY.
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wrote:

A pile stacked 4' x 4' x 8'. I can burn about 5 cords if I heat my house with mostly wood. As I got older, I found it easier to pay the oil bill and turn the thermostat to the desired temperature.
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Thanks Ed. I'll ask my cousin what he does for winter. 5 cords is a lot of wood to chop.
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On 7/28/2012 4:48 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

We have an Omron. It has a RTC and the ability to track two separate users. The readings matche the DOCs mercury sphygmomanometer.

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wrote:

Take your blood pressure? ;-)

Sure. I used one of the cheapie wrist models for a couple of years. It read a bit on the low side but worked well enough. FWIG, these don't work as well on other people so an arm cuff is preferred. Last fall I bought a Panasonic cuff like this one:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)43517272&sr=8-1&keywords=blood+pressure+monitor+panasonic
It works well enough but is a bit more of a pain to use than the wrist model.
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)43517272&sr=8-1&keywords=blood+pressure+monitor+panasonic
My wrist model does not work on me.
Greg
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Mine ran about ten points low on me. That's alright, the doc's always runs at least forty points high. ;-)
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