any alterations required in replacing a 2 piece toilet with a 1 piece?

The title pretty much says it all.
?
Thanks!
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I've never done it, but I can't see why any alterations would be needed.
Depending on what kind of flooring you have in your bathroom, the old two piece toilet may leave a "foot print" on the flooring. The new one piece toilet might not cover that old foot print entirely. About the only fix for that is to replace the flooring in the bathroom, but that's not always in the budget.
--
nestork

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Check out these images, as well as others available on the web:
http://www.johnbridge.com/images/mike2/For%20Liberry%20Stuff/Plumbing/Toilet%20Rough%20In.jpg
http://www.plumbingsupply.com/images/ur-rough-in-dims.jpg
Those pictures give you the standard rough in measurements for toilets. As long as the old one was a fairly recent standard installation, anything bought new today should fit.
Of course, we don't know what type of 2 piece toilet you had. I had a 2 piece like this in a basement bathroom many years ago:
http://www.hiplyfe.com/well-design-of-wall-mount-toilet-tank/wall-mount-toilet-tank-pic7/
The tank was bolted to the block wall. The toilet was roughed in when there was no finish wall so when I redid the bathroom I had to use furring strips instead of a stud wall to leave myself enough room for the toilet. I ended up with less than 1" between the back of the toilet and the baseboard.
I only point this out so you'll be aware that anything non-standard with your current install could make it a little harder to swap the toilets.
Another thing to consider is the shape of the base. In that same basement bathroom I replaced the "new" toilet with an even newer one several years later. The bases were different shapes/sizes and you can see the outline of the old toilet in the linoleum flooring if you look carefully enough. Due to fading and cleaning over the years, the newly exposed area is slightly darker than the rest of the floor. Even a tiled floor might show some discoloration or there might be something that is now covered that will be exposed when the toilet is replaced. The only way to find out is to pull the old toilet and see what it looks like underneath.
One last item... it's not an "alteration" but you should do a careful inspection of the area under the existing toilet before installing the new one. Check the subfloor for rot, check the closet flange for cracks, check for loose tiles, etc. As long as the toilet is off, you should make sure the area below is it as close to perfect as possible to ensure years of trouble-free enjoyment of your new toilet.
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