Ants, Lots of Ants

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While you're waiting for the bait to work, some odors repel ants, for a while. They really seem to hate eucylptus, citrus and lavendar. I sprinkled some essential oil on cotton balls and left them around the windowsills they were crawling on, although an aroma diffuser might work as well. I also sprayed a bit of lemon juice. This kept them at bay, and it was fun to see them run for cover. But I did kill as many as I could, though considering the numbers, that's a useless endeavor.
Kelly
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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wrote:

I've used Tero with great success. The bait is a clear heavy liquid placed on cardboard squares. After a few hours you'll see thousands of ants carrying the bait back to the colony. This works with "sugar" ants.
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wrote:

I've had success with Raid's double control ant control baits.
Take a day or two depending on the amount of ants you have. If you can get many to visit the station, you should see results in a day.
hth,
tom @ www.FreeCreditReportAdvice.com
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wrote:

If you have trouble getting them to eat your commercial bait, see what they do eat and make bait out of that. Use about 1 part boric acid and 12 parts food.
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I got an article the other day from someone that said Aspartame was developed as an ant poison. Wonder if anyone has ever heard of using nutra sweet to kill ants. Seems according to the article that it interferes with their nervous systems.
If I find it I will post it.
LJ
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On Mon, 24 Jul 2006 09:24:20 -0500, Steve broke out their crayolas and scribbled:

Pharaoh Ant, sugar ant, and piss ant, are some of the common names for what seem to be really small ants (1/16") that can invade the walls of a house in the southern United States and can be a PIA getting rid of them. Wipe counter spaces off with vinegar and allow to air dry to keep them off of food preparation areas. Clean and reapply vinegar after preping food or daily as required. Then set bait stations out "in line" with the trails that they use. Avon's (TM) Skin-So-Soft (TM) can be sprayed on table legs but must be reapplied weekly to be effective.
I was told by an externinator that spraying this type of ant with bug spray applications only causes them to split the colony and spreading the colony further. I don't state this as fact, only repeating what I was told by someone I felt was compedent. He recognised the critters as soon as he saw them and recomended I look them up on the "net".
Here is a couple of links that may be of interest. http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2136.html http://insects.tamu.edu/extension/bulletins/l-2061.html
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Combat ant killing gel. 0.95 ounce syringe...get it at home depot. works every time
Wally

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Steve wrote:

and they are looking for food/water. If they nest outside, you should be able to find their entry near where you find them inside. Put some bait outside as well as on their path inside. clean real well first, even if it is already clean. They can smell coffee cake and butter from miles away, and a crumb is a meal :o) Terro has always worked well for me. Down in Florida, it never fails that if I keep a box of cookies or coffee cake on the counter, ants will be in after them. A drop of sugary liquid spilled on the counter will attract ants, even when it is dry.
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wrote:

eat protiens of some sort. Sugar doesn't seen to attract them at all.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

the fridge. Most people I know, if they keep sweet stuff on hand, keep it in the fridge. Roaches are another concern. I rarely see ants in the house = perhaps three times in 8 years here? Trash pickup is twice a week, everywhere here. Nobody uses paper sacks for groceries, or keeps newspapers and paper sacks around because roaches roost in them. They even like the glue on envelopes = there were roaches in my mailbox last week :o)
About the same frequency I had them in the house up north, but that seemed always to be spring. During one very dry spell = a real drought - I saw really strange insect behavior. Couldn't have an open drink outdoors or hornets and bees would be after it. Had breakfast at an outdoor cafe during the drought, and small bees of some kind kept coming at my eyes! Had to almost eat with my eyes closed. Wierd!
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wrote: .

I'm betwewn Ft Myers and Naples. I don't have the roach thing here, just ants. Whever I do see some "american cockroaches" AKA palmetto bugs I toss a pack of Combat baits around and I won't see another one for a year. I do have plenty of reptiles here that like bugs so ants are the only real thing without a predator. We don't mind the anoles and the occasional tree frog in the pool cage.
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Steve wrote:

It sounds like you are describing /monomorium minimum/, or the Little Black Ant. You cannot hope to beat them, you can only hope to hold the line. I know from experience. (I'm convinced that the entirety of North America is just one large ant colony...guess I saw the 50s movie "Them" too much!) These ants are looking for food and water, and when they find it, they will come, oh yes they will. They're no fire ants, but they are persistent as hell.
Seriously, your best bet is as follows: (1) keep food areas clean - do not leave dirty dishes in the sink, use a trash can with a secure lid, put food like cereals and sugars into sealable containers, wipe your counters as you go when you cook (2) keep wet areas such as laundry, bathroom, etc. dry as much as possible; use exhaust fans, wipe up wet footprints from the shower and the like, and don't leave water laying in the wash tubs or wherever your clothes washer empties (3) if you have pets, do not leave food in the bowls; wash bowls after the pet(s) is/are done; keep any small quantities of dry food in sealable containers and large quantities stored away from the rest of the food in the house (4) use indoor-safe barrier sprays such as those recommended in other posts to spray door and window sills in high risk areas, spray along kickboards of counters in kitchen and pull out your stove and 'fridge to spray behind them as well; depending upon the potency of the product, you may have to do this as often as once every couple months (5) keep the area against the house clear of plants and plant debris; cut away any branches that touch the house, and rake away dead matter such as leaves, pine needles and the like (mulch might be OK) (6) use outdoor high-potency barrier sprays around doors and windows and hit any foundation cracks or other gaps in the house's integrity; put down a 1-2 foot wide barrier of granules that the ants won't want to cross
As others have mentioned, do not attempt to attack the ants at their nest(s) - the holes in the ground or if you accidentally unearth part of the colony. These bad boys panic so quickly when attacked that the colony will split at the point of attack and you'll now have two colonies with two queens to deal with instead of just one.
Good luck!
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