Ants and the shed door

Page 1 of 2  
Sorry if this has been asked before.
I noticed yesterday that the inside of my fairly new and not cheap shed, the door is starting to rot at the bottom. Ants are all over it. Can I sand it and treat it with something? The wood isn't solid wood in the doors, I don't know what to call it, it's sort of mottled looking. The rest of the shed is solid wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

MinWax epoxy wood and there's a liquid for repairng dry rot before applying the epoxy fill.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

MinWax epoxy wood and there's a liquid for repairing dry rot before applying the epoxy fill.
*The Minwax wood hardener is excellent for getting into the wood fibers. The wood filler is identical to auto body filler and does a good job of filling in holes. Home Depot and Lowes are eliminating these products in their efforts to be more environmentally friendly. Unfortunately the water based substitutes that they now sell are not the same.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Automobile "bondo"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

..or if you want something stronger, albeit a bit less forgiving when it comes to sanding and shaping, DuraGlass might be an option.
In the generalist of senses, it's a bondo-like filler embedded with fiberglass strands.
Some say to use DuraGlass for your major filling and shaping and then use bondo as the final coat since it's so much easier to finish.
The website site doesn't mention using it on wood, but I can state with 100% certainty that it works well for repairing rotted window sills.
http://www.uschem.com/index.cfm?page=productDetail&id=52
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/29/2012 3:15 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Thank you, and everyone who replied! This will do double-duty since I have some rotted window sills in my downstairs bathroom that need tending to as well.
I really appreciate the replies!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You may want to practice on some scrap wood before you attack your projects to get a feel for cure time, sanding ability, etc.
Since this product contains fiberglass, consider wearing a decent dust mask while working with it, especially while sanding it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/30/2012 11:17 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Thanks I will. Now I have to find out where to buy that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It can be purchased at automobile parts stores and marine supply stores like West Marine. If your 'chain' auto store doesn't carry it, one the independent stores will. We have a couple of retail auto paint shops in my area that carry it too.
Then there's Amazon and lots of other online sources.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 1 Jun 2012 00:23:23 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

I'd use the Marine stores if you need it right away. You'll pay a premium, but I wouldn't use the automotive bondo near wood. I think it holds too much moisture and will accelerate the rotting of the nearby wood. Bondo makes a marine grade filler that doesn't hold [as much? ] moisture.

That's where I'd go--- [or back here where I got the stuff for my garage door *-10? years ago. Still perfect- http://www.rotdoctor.com /
Jim [just checked my files-- Aug 2002 is when I used it on my door]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Does it really hold water ? But it's used on metal cars.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-snip-

-snip-
And surrounded by impervious stuff like metal or paint. Make a gob- weigh it- toss it into a bucket of water overnight and weigh it again. It holds lots of water.
Note that Bondo sells a separate wood filler and they recommend using wood stabilizer before using the wood filler.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/1/2012 9:12 AM, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

Thanks for the resource!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I got introduced to rotdoctor 20 years ago when I was rescuing a 40 year old wooden boat. The transom was good for several years- then the other side got funky so I replaced the whole thing. The wood got tossed on the compost pile and every so often the 'rotdoctored' piece gets to the top of the pile to remind me about that fun old boat.
After I realized it had been 10 years on the door repair I went out to take a better look at it. Wish I'd written down what kind of paint I'd used, too. The door looks as good as the day I finished it. [right down to the outside latch not being installed yet<g>]
The stuff isn't cheap--- but it sure does work well.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/3/2012 7:07 AM, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

I still haven't had a chance to rescue my shed door but with all of the suggestions here I think I can do it. I replaced the shed that was already in place when I bought this house because the previous homeowner had started a compost pile behind it and it was so overgrown with weeds about 10' high that it was impossible to get in there to fix it, plus I kept hearing wildlife in there and not sure what it was. The rot was coming through the back of the shed and it was full of holes. I was afraid of snakes being the wildlife so I hired someone to grade it to the ground before putting in a new shed. This time I'm not sure why the rot other than maybe the composition of the door material. And maybe the way the door sits against the ramp holds too much water. Maybe there is a treatment or covering that I can use on the ramp that won't hold water so much. I have to have the ramp for my riding mower.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-snip-

Picture is worth a thousand words-- Depending on the size of the door-- if it is made of particle board-- or even OSB-- it might be worthwhile to replace at least some of it.
North, east, south or west wall? Shaded?
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/4/2012 7:44 AM, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

The inside is particle board, the outside seems solid. I'll get pictures Thurs. The doors face northish and it is next to a 6' fence on the left side that faces mostly east. Behind it is also a 6' fence (it's on a corner of my property). It gets a lot of sun but I guess the bottom of the doors are mostly shaded due to a very poofy Crepe Myrtle next to it on the westish side.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/5/2012 8:23 PM, Cheryl wrote:

Have you poked around into the rotted areas to make sure there aren't termites?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/6/2012 8:18 AM, Norminn wrote:

That is a very good possibility too. But would ants and termites co-habitate? My area can be plagued with swarmers and I've had to have my house treated, and am on a maintenance plan to keep it termite free but I've seen swarmers out during the spring and they took care of a tree stump so I never had to have it removed. Far enough from the house that I wasn't worried, but it's possible they're attacking my shed now. Thanks.
The first spring after I bought this house I kept seeing winged creatures in the bathtub in the lower level of the house. I finally realized they were termite swarmers when I found the difference between termites and ants in that stage. Ants have jointed antenna and termites have straight ones. Body shape at the thorax is also different. Checked around and found a pest control company that uses Termidor. Actually now that you mention that and I questioned it, I used to get ants in my house in the spring but haven't had them since Termidor and that's been 10 years now. The pest control company inspects yearly but I guess the first clue I'll see to know it needs another treatment will be ants. So ignore my question about ants and termites co-habitating. I guess I know the answer. :) Wow did I ramble or what.......
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/6/2012 11:18 PM, Cheryl wrote:

Yike! Does the pest control company take care of the shed, too? You in Florida? In FL, it is not "will I get termites" but "When". I'm posting a link to one of the articles on U of Fla website that has scads of good, useful info for gardens and homes: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ig097
This article is about subterranean termies, but has links to find whatever you need....carpenter ants are known to inhabit termite tunnels, but both can be found in same conditions. Damp or rotted wood. Here is article about carpenter ants: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ig123
When I lived in Fla, my husband was the condo building mgr/handyman. We worked on lots of long-neglected problems that resulted from poor maintenance. U of Fla has good articles about PREVENTING infestations and how to find signs of term. infestation. Carpenter ants (and fire ants) are interesting critters and not that difficult to manage. Read up on these before you dump buckets of poison around...just cleaning up landscaping, caulking gaps in building, painting, can do a great deal to avoid problems.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.