Antique Fir Wood Putty

I am installing some recovered-antique (100 yr old) Fir hardwood floor boards. Very satisfying project, I must say. The color of the vintage fir is very distict, with rich creamy yellows and reds all of its own.
I went through the trouble of locating the old stock in the basement, where it had been used as shelving, from the time the house was built. The toungue and groove was still there and the boards were the full 3/4"+. I was able to salvage just enough stock to refloor a small hallway that was reconfigured from the original layout.
Whenever I compare the modern fir with the old, the new stuff seems to have the pink hue throughout and hardly any yellow. Would be OK on a new stand-alone install, but in a house already fitted with the old fir - too much contrast between new and old.
Anyway, my question is about Wood Putty. I'd like to use the sawdust from this project to fill the nail holes etc. Can anyone share a good recipe?
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Michael Stoic wrote:

It and any binder...varnish, shellac, lacquer, glue, polyester resin...
The color will vary depending on the binder. Generally, it will be *much* darker than the wood itself. White glue gives a about the nearest to the color of the saw dust; however, it won't "pop" when a top coat is applied.
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dadiOH wrote:

Dry color varies also depending on whether it is saw dust or sanding dust. Water base poly varnish might keep the sawdust color pretty well, don't know, never tried it.
As to how much sawdust to binder, enough of each to make a thick paste.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
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Thanks dadiOH,
I recall at another occasion, a floor sander doing refinishing (same vintage fir) in another part of the house, applied the putty after the sealer coat, but before the final coats.
I was not too happy at the time as I felt that there was insufficient time for the putty to dry. In most of the cases, I turned out wrong and the putty matched pretty well and holds to the day (four years from repairs).
This time, I have a chance to apply the putty before any of the sanding begins, but this leaves me to select the putty compound compatible with (water based) sealer and poly.
Can you share any advice on that end of things?
Thank you,
MS
wrote:

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Michael Stoic wrote:

Any mentioned would work OK. I'd probably just use the poly.
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Many thanks for your advice!
MS
wrote:

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Michael Stoic wrote:

One other comment...
The putty can take a LONG time to thoroughly dry....days and days in the case of poly, a few days if lacquer is used as the binder. Oh, it will *seem* dry rather quickly but it isn't. And as it dries it will shrink.
That said, do your filling and wait until you are sure it is dry before you do your final sanding and aplpy a surface coat.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
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